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I have a custom .vimrc file which I use across many different machines.

Some machines are less powerful than others, and it would be nice to be able to load a "stripped-down" version of the .vimrc file. However, I'd like to maintain a single .vimrc to avoid fragmentation.

Ideally, I'd like to pass arguments to my .vimrc from the command line. If the "minimal" option is selected, the .vimrc would skip over loading the most resource-intensive plugins.

Does anyone know the best/cleanest way to do this?

Thanks!

Edit: The slower machine I'm talking about is a Raspberry Pi over SSH. Vim itself isn't slow, although I have several plugins including NERDTree and Syntastic that take lots of time to load on the Pi's limited CPU. By taking out most plugins for my "minimal" configuration, I cut down the loading time from 3.5 seconds to 0.5 seconds.

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3  
"Some machines are less powerful than others..." (How much power does Vim really need? ;) – summea Jan 14 '14 at 19:03
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I have an idea. read /proc/xxx to get cpu info, memory, available memory, cpu load etc. then decide to load which vim config. It could be done with vimscript (with the support of external command) or other language/scripts, as a wrapper of your vim start script. this is doable however...@summea 's comment is nice! – Kent Jan 14 '14 at 19:13
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I accidentally tagged this as a dupe of stackoverflow.com/questions/4618151/… - it isn't quite a dupe but you might find that question useful – Ken Jan 14 '14 at 19:14
    
I would be curious about what parts of one's vimrc could require more power than others. – romainl Jan 14 '14 at 20:00
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The slower machine I'm talking about is a Raspberry Pi over SSH. Vim itself isn't slow, although I have several plugins including NERDTree and Syntastic that take lots of time to load on the Pi's limited CPU. By taking out most plugins for my "minimal" configuration, I cut down the loading time from 3.5 seconds to 0.5 seconds. – Bill Jan 14 '14 at 20:52
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the --cmd switch to execute a command before any VIMRC is loaded.

So on your less powerful machines you could alias vim to something like vim --cmd 'let weak=1' and then in your $VIMRC you can say:

if exists('weak')
  echo "poor machine"
endif
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You may also want to use the :finish command. – benjifisher Jan 14 '14 at 22:14
    
You could set up an alias for this: alias vim='vim --cmd "let weak=1"' in your .bashrc – Tom Cammann Jan 15 '14 at 16:21

take a look at source:

source /foo/bar/another_vimrc

Your 'heavy' vimrc can just source the basic vimrc and add what you want. This is also really handy for project/machine specific abbreviations, ctags, etc.

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1  
That's how I do it. Different local file on every machine. Here's the last line of my ~/.vimrc: if filereadable(expand('~/.vim-local/vimrc-local')) | source ~/.vim-local/vimrc-local | endif. I could do more complex things with ~/vimrc-local/after files and some runtimepath manipulation, but so far things are working fine with a single local file. – Jim Stewart Jan 14 '14 at 19:16

This will not keep a single vimrc file, but for the sake of others who have the same question (as stated at the top of the page):

$ vim -u ~/.vim-min.vim

Note that this will suppress loading both the system vimrc file (if any) and your personal vimrc file.

:help -u
:help startup

(See Step 3 of the second reference.)

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