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I am working on a simple wages application. I have a menu with 4 options and a text file called "shop-account" that simply contains the value 100. For option one the user is suppose to be able to transfer an amount from this 100. The user should be able to make multiple transactions but cannot overdraw the account.

Currently I have have just been opening the file and declaring the value 100 to the int "balance", then asking the user to input the amount to be transferred ("NewAmount") and simply subtracting it. However this only works for one transaction.

When I go back and try and make a second transfer it again subtracts from 100, not the updated amount. So I was wondering if anyone know how I would go about getting the file to update after each transaction?

int balance;
int NewAmount;


fstream infile;
infile.open("shop-account.txt");
infile >> balance;

do {
    cout << "1. Transfer an amount" <<endl;
    cout << "2. List recent transactions"<<endl;
    cout << "3. Display account details and current balance"<<endl;
    cout << "4. Quit" << endl;

    cout << "Please enter menu number"<<endl;

    cin >> selection;

    switch(selection) {
    case 1: 
        cout << "You have choosen to transfer an amount" << endl;
        cout << "How much do you wish to transfer from the shop account?"<<endl;
        cin >> NewAmount;
        cout << balance - NewAmount << endl;

        break;

    case 2:
        cout << "Here are you're recent transactions" <<endl;
        cout << "" << endl;
        cout << "" << endl;
        break;

    case 3:
        cout << "The account names is:" << name << endl;
        cout << "The account number is:" << number << endl;
        cout << "The current balance is\n\n" << endl; //Need to get cuurent balance still
        break;

    case 4:
        return 0;
        break;

    default:
        cout << "Ooops, invalid selection!" << endl;
        break;
    }

} while(selection != 4);

    system("pause");
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? – Christopher Berman Jan 14 '14 at 20:43
    
No it's just an exercise from a book. I've been trying to figure it out all day and I'm completley stumped just need pushed in the right direction – user3057816 Jan 14 '14 at 20:50

Basically your file contains only one data, so doing partial updates makes no sense at all.

All you have to do is read it at the begining, like you did, and write it back entirely each time you did a transaction.

int read_balance (void)
{
    fstream f;
    f.open("shop-account.txt");
    f >> balance;
    f.close();
    return balance;
}

void write_balance (int balance)
{
    fstream f;
    f.open("shop-account.txt");
    f << balance;
    f.close();
}

and then in your code:

cout << "You have choosen to transfer an amount" << endl;
cout << "How much do you wish to transfer from the shop account?"<<endl;
cin >> NewAmount;
balance -= NewAmount;
write_balance (balance);
cout << balance << endl;
share|improve this answer

To "update" a file, you have to write the whole file with the parts changed that you are "updating".

share|improve this answer

The most efficient way to do this would be to memory map the file (mmap() in Unix), update it in memory and allow the OS to flush the altered version back to disk (either periodically or on close).

share|improve this answer
1  
How would that be efficient? If you're handling money, better not implement whatever homebrewed cache system that would risk losing some transactions on crash/power failure and/or write an inconsistent state to disk. Besides, memory mapped I/O are way beyond the scope of such a simple question. – kuroi neko Jan 14 '14 at 20:51
    
'Homebrewed cache'? Really? I'm sure the Linux implementers would be fascinated to hear its virtual memory subsystem described thus. Memory-mapping files is hardly some esoteric technique. It's a one-liner. And call msync() if you need to flush changes. – David G Jan 14 '14 at 21:26
    
Really, making the OS jump through all these hoops to read/write 4 bytes in a file should be well worth the effort. Especially when your memory mapped file will be synced every time you write the said 4 bytes. I'm sure the OP could not cope with basic file I/O without a deep understanding of a unix-specific interface, whose use happens to be pointless in that particular case. – kuroi neko Jan 14 '14 at 22:13

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