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Look at the following code. What is wrong with it? The compiler gives the this error:

In copy constructor person::person(person&)': No matching function for call toperson::copy(char*&, char*&)' candidates are: void person::copy(char*&, const char*&) "

Here is the code:

class person
{
  public:
    person();
    person(person &);

  private:
    void copy(char*&,const char*&);
    char* name, *fathername,* address;
};

void person::copy( char*& n, const char*& p)
{
  int result;
  result=strcmp(n,p);
  if(result!=0)
  {
    n=new char[strlen(p)+1];
    strcpy(n,p);
    n[strlen(p)]='\0';
  }
}
person::person(person &object)
{
  copy(name,object.name);
  copy(fathername,object.fathername);
  copy(address, object.address);
}

From the answers to this Question what I understood up until now is given by: the compiler does not allow to convert a reference to a constant reference because references are already constant. They can't point to a different memory location like pointer. Am I right?

share|improve this question
    
can you please indent it properly –  Yogesh Arora Jan 21 '10 at 19:59
1  
Even if it worked, this code leaks memory. Why not simply use std::string and avoid such errors? –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 21 '10 at 20:04
    
Dear Sir its not the whole code , i only posted the code which has problem. –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 20:11
    
strcmp against n, where was n allocated? strcmp on NULL is bad. Even if n is allocated, it's then dropped by the new just below; good form would suggest that n get delete[]d first. –  dash-tom-bang Jan 21 '10 at 20:15
    
ya you are right but this is not the whole code , i only posted the code that has problem , i know that stcmp on NULL is bad but in this problem n and p are not null. –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 20:23

9 Answers 9

Wouldn't this be nicer?

class person
{
private:
  std::string name;
  std::string fathername
  std::string address;
};

// constructor and copy constructor autogenerated!

It's more "C++" this way ;).

share|improve this answer
1  
ya its nice but the nature of the problem is different –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 20:09
    
hey its good to use strings, but from the type of question he has asked , i think he is more of a beginner in c++/oo programming . It better to clear your concepts like this..rather than directly jumping on to string –  Yogesh Arora Jan 21 '10 at 20:10
1  
@Yogesh - this is actually a matter of principle -- people comming from low-level language backgrounds tend to think that std::string's are bloated and ineffective in usage, that's why despite using C++ they use char*. In each such situation someone should point out that there's std::string... –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jan 21 '10 at 20:16
    
@Yogesh - also, the value of learning to use char* before std::string when learning C++ is at least controversial -- there are two schools of that thought, and you shouldn't assume that one is the only true. –  Kornel Kisielewicz Jan 21 '10 at 20:18
7  
Why would you do that. If all the member variables are std::string then compiler generated copy constructor works just fine, you should not be writting your own. –  Loki Astari Jan 21 '10 at 20:46

Unless you are planning on changing the pointers you should not pass the references to the pointers:

Change:

void person::copy( char*& n, const char*& p) 

to

void person::copy( char* n, const char* p) 

This is because p is a reference to a particular type.
The object you passed is not the exact type and becuase it is a reference their is no way to convert it.

The change I suggested above allows for a "pointer to const char" (p) thus allowing read only access to elements via 'p'. Now a "pointer to char" allows read/write access to the data so converting this to "pointer to const char" is allowed because we are just limiting the allowed behavior.

There are a whole set of other problems with the code you posted.
Do you want us to list them?

I don't do NOW. I do on my schedule.

Problems:

1: You leak on each call to copy:

if(result!=0)
{
    n=new char[strlen(p)+1];   // What happned to the old n?

2: The default assignment operator is used.

person a;
person b;
a = b; // a.name == b.name etc all point at the same memory location.
       // Though because you do not delete anything in the destructor
       // it is technically not an issue yet.

3: You done delete the allocated members in the destructor.

{
     person  a;
} // A destructor called. You leak all the member here.

4: strcpy() already copies the terminating '\0' character.

5: if the call to new throws an exception. You will leak memory.

copy(name,object.name); 
copy(fathername,object.fathername);   // If new throws in here.
                                      // Then the this.name will be leaked.

Doing this correctly using C-String is so hard that even a C++ expert would have problems doing this correctly. Thats why C++ experts would use std::string rather than a C-String. If you must use C-Strings then you should wrap your C-String in another class to protect it from probelms with exceptions.

share|improve this answer
    
ya you should list all the problems without asking –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 21:17
    
your answer is helpful, compiler is not allowing to convert a reference to a constant reference because references are already constant, they can't point to a different memory location like pointer am i right??????? –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 21:21
1  
+1 for "I don't do NOW. I do on my schedule.", cheers for explaining my answer in such a complete and nice way too. –  gbjbaanb Jan 22 '10 at 13:30

Change

person::person(person &object)

to

person::person(const person &object)

for starters...

share|improve this answer
    
i liked this tip –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 19:59

The compiler is telling you the problem - change your signature to accept 2 char* pointers (rather than 1 const char*) and it should compile.

The issue is really due ot the use of the reference - if you had created a copy method that simply took 2 char* pointers (not references) then the compiler will automatically recognise the conversion from char* to const char* and use the method. As you only have a method that accepts a reference to a different type it cannot do that automatically.

share|improve this answer
    
please explain in understanable manner , i could not understand it –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 20:08
    
this is the answer to my question , but i need explanation of this answere –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 20:15
    
See @Martin York's answer below. Remember, only use & with pointers (e.g. char *) when you will modify the pointer. –  Thomas Matthews Jan 21 '10 at 21:05

I'm feeling generous, so here is a corrected version of your code:

class person
{
public:
    person();
    person(const person &);
    ~person();
private:
    void copy(char*&,   // Do you understand purpose of '&' here?
              const char*);
    char* name;
    char* fathername;
    char* address;
};

person::person()
    : name(NULL),
      fathername(NULL),
      address(NULL)
{
}

person::~person()
{
    delete[] name;
    delete[] fathername;
    delete[] address;
}

void person::copy( char*& n,  // The '&' is required because the contents of `n` are changed.
                   const char* p)
{
    delete[] n;
    n = NULL;     // Here is one place where contents of `n` are changed.
    if (p)
    {
        n = new char [strlen(p) + sizeof('\0')];  // Another content changing location.
        strcpy(n, p);
        n[strlen(p)]='\0';
    }
}

person::person(const person& object)
{
    copy(name,object.name);
    copy(fathername,object.fathername);
    copy(address, object.address);
}

Can you identify the flaws or safety items still lurking?

share|improve this answer
    
ya i know all these , as i have previously written this is not the actual code which i posted , i posted only that code which has problem, i removed the code of destructor and constructors because of simplicity, because you know people hate to read lengthy code. –  Zia ur Rahman Jan 21 '10 at 21:25
1  
Ooh! Ooh! It's not self-assignment safe. :) –  Bill Jan 21 '10 at 21:28

As others are saying, you shouldn't pass the char pointer by reference if you are not going to modify it.

The problem is that the reference is non-const and therefore doesn't bind to temporaries. Therefore the passed variable's type must match exactly. Near matches that would involve an implicit cast are not acceptable, because the result of an implicit cast is a temporary.

Const references, on the other hand, can be bound to temporaries.

void non_constant(int&);
void constant(const int&);

int main()
{
    int i = 0;
    unsigned u = 0;
    non_constant(i);
    //non_constant(u);  //ERROR: not an int
    //non_constant(10);  //ERROR: literals are temporaries
    constant(i);
    constant(u);  //OK, unsigned implicitly cast to int
    constant(10); //OK, literals bind to const references
}

So, if you wanted badly to keep the reference in the argument:

void person::copy( char*& n, const char* const& p)
share|improve this answer

This is VERY (!) poor design. This code is buggy and VERY (!) hard to understand and maintain. This question is continuation for this question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2108389/c-classes-object-oriented-programming/2108601#2108601.

Now you struggling with symptoms, not with real problem. And real problem is to think in C++ terms not in C (if you want to became C++ object-oriented programmer).

Valid C++ code (C++, not C with classes) here:

#include <string>

class person
{
public:
  person();
private:
  std::string name, fathername, address;
};

Thats all. All other things (including copy contstructor) C++ compiler generates for you (as well effective as you own manual implementation)! This much simpler, much clearer, easier to maintain and understand, and first of all: bug free;). And this is true C++ code.

share|improve this answer

Others have already correctly answered your question, but it seems you didn't understand it so far, so I will try to make it as clear as possible for you.

void person::copy( char*& n, const char*& p)

This function expects as the second argument a non-const reference to a const pointer (and not a const reference to a pointer as you might think!).

When you try to call this function passing as the second argument a pointer (not a const pointer) the compiler is unable to create a reference for it, simply because it expects to bind a reference to a const pointer and it is not allowed to implicitly cast the pointer to a const pointer, since non-const references may not bind to rvalues (temporary values).

If you want the function to expect a const reference to a const pointer, you have to change its signature as shown below:

void person::copy( char*& n, const char* const& p)

Here it is important to understant that the compiler implicitly casts the provided pointer to a const pointer before binding the reference, which is allowed in this case, since a const reference may bind both to rvalues and lvalues.

Similarly, if you want the function to expect a const reference to a pointer, which was probably your original intention, then the signature should be as shown bellow:

void person::copy( char*& n, char* const& p)

Here the compiler doesn't have to implicitly cast anything, since the provided argument already matches the type the reference expects to bind.

I hope I made it clear and detailed for you and that you correctly understood what caused the problem, which is indeed important, but nonetheless, I would strongly advice you not to write your code like this, but instead to follow the suggestions given by the others.

share|improve this answer

Others pointed that you should replace reference with pointer.

Here are a few other but related comments:

  1. If you define copy constructor, define assignment operator too. They should go along together, in most cases.

  2. It's a good practice to declare single argument constructor as explicit.

  3. Naming objects as object is a bad convention and may lead to confusions. It's abvious every instance of type person is an object. Use more meaningful names, like person(const person& other); or person(const person& rhs); // after right-hand-side

  4. Use std::string. If you are programming in C++, there is no rational reason to not to use std::string and juggle C-strings instead.

  5. Finally, take care of exception safety, follow best practices like copying oprations implemented in terms of non-throwing swap operation. See article Exception-Safe Class Design, Part 1: Copy Assignment by Herb Sutter

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