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For illustrative purposes, let's say I want to implement a generic integer comparing function. I can think of a few approaches for the definition/invocation of the function.

(A) Function Template + functors

template <class Compare> void compare_int (int a, int b, const std::string& msg, Compare cmp_func) 
{
    if (cmp_func(a, b)) std::cout << "a is " << msg << " b" << std::endl;
    else std::cout << "a is not " << msg << " b" << std::endl;
}

struct MyFunctor_LT {
    bool operator() (int a, int b) {
        return a<b;
    }
};

And this would be a couple of calls to this function:

MyFunctor_LT mflt;
MyFunctor_GT mfgt; //not necessary to show the implementation
compare_int (3, 5, "less than", mflt);
compare_int (3, 5, "greater than", mflt);

(B) Function template + lambdas

We would call compare_int like this:

compare_int (3, 5, "less than", [](int a, int b) {return a<b;});
compare_int (3, 5, "greater than", [](int a, int b) {return a>b;});

(C) Function template + std::function

Same template implementation, invocation:

std::function<bool(int,int)> func_lt = [](int a, int b) {return a<b;}; //or a functor/function
std::function<bool(int,int)> func_gt = [](int a, int b) {return a>b;}; 

compare_int (3, 5, "less than", func_lt);
compare_int (3, 5, "greater than", func_gt);

(D) Raw "C-style" pointers

Implementation:

void compare_int (int a, int b, const std::string& msg, bool (*cmp_func) (int a, int b)) 
{
 ...
}

bool lt_func (int a, int b) 
{
    return a<b;
}

Invocation:

compare_int (10, 5, "less than", lt_func); 
compare_int (10, 5, "greater than", gt_func);

With those scenarios laid out, we have in each case:

(A) Two template instances (two different parameters) will be compiled and allocated in memory.

(B) I would say also two template instances would be compiled. Each lambda is a different class. Correct me if I'm wrong, please.

(C) Only one template instance would be compiled, since template parameter is always te same: std::function<bool(int,int)>.

(D) Obviously we only have one instance.

Needless to day, it doesn't make a difference for such a naive example. But when working with dozens (or hundreds) of templates, and numerous functors, the compilation times and memory usage difference can be substantial.

Can we say that in many circumstances (i.e., when using too many functors with the same signature) std::function (or even function pointers) must be preferred over templates+raw functors/lambdas? Wrapping your functor or lambda with std::function may be very convenient.

I am aware that std::function (function pointer too) introduces an overhead. Is it worth it?

EDIT. I did a very simple benchmark using the following macros and a very common standard library function template (std::sort):

#define TEST(X) std::function<bool(int,int)>  f##X = [] (int a, int b) {return (a^X)<(b+X);}; \
std::sort (v.begin(), v.end(), f##X);

#define TEST2(X) auto f##X = [] (int a, int b) {return (a^X)<(b^X);}; \
std::sort (v.begin(), v.end(), f##X);

#define TEST3(X) bool(*f##X)(int, int) = [] (int a, int b) {return (a^X)<(b^X);}; \ 
std::sort (v.begin(), v.end(), f##X);

Results are the following regarding size of the generated binaries (GCC at -O3):

  • Binary with 1 TEST macro instance: 17009
  • 1 TEST2 macro instance: 9932
  • 1 TEST3 macro instance: 9820
  • 50 TEST macro instances: 59918
  • 50 TEST2 macro instances: 94682
  • 50 TEST3 macro instances: 16857

Even if I showed the numbers, it is a more qualitative than quantitative benchmark. As we were expecting, function templates based on the std::function parameter or function pointer scale better (in terms of size), as not so many instances are created. I did not measure runtime memory usage though.

As for the performance results (vector size is 1000000 of elements):

  • 50 TEST macro instances: 5.75s
  • 50 TEST2 macro instances: 1.54s
  • 50 TEST3 macro instances: 3.20s

It is a notable difference, and we must not neglect the overhead introduced by std::function (at least if our algorithms consist of millions of iterations).

share|improve this question
    
If it is stateless, you can convert a lambda to a function pointer. Just use the unary magic. –  dyp Jan 14 at 22:37
1  
Lambdas are syntactic sugar for functors; (A) and (B) are identical and do not require separate analysis. –  Casey Jan 14 at 23:01
    
@Casey I agree, but I wasn't 100% sure if two different lambdas mean two different template parameters. –  jbgs Jan 14 at 23:20
    
your +X is UB on sort as it is no longer an ordering. Try (a^X)<(b^X) to get well defined behaviour that is distinct for each X. Also, create Test3 where you assign it to bool(*)(int,int) which stateless lambdas support. –  Yakk Jan 15 at 13:34
    
You are right, I didn't even think of the comparison function. I was just interested in measuring code sizes due to template instantiations. Anyway, I updated the results with the new function. They are roughly the same. I also added the results (TEST3) for a function pointer. I think the conclusion is straightforward. Working on memory constrained systems and passing more than 10-15 distinct functors/lambdas with the same signature to a template? Then use function pointers. But for best performance use always "raw" functors/lambdas. –  jbgs Jan 15 at 15:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

As others have already pointed out, lambdas and function objects are likely to be inlined, especially if the body of the function is not too long. As a consequence, they are likely to be better in terms of speed and memory usage than the std::function approach. The compiler can optimize your code more aggressively if the function can be inlined. Shockingly better. std::function would be my last resort for this reason, among other things.

But when working with dozens (or hundreds) of templates, and numerous functors, the compilation times and memory usage difference can be substantial.

As for the compilation times, I wouldn't worry too much about it as long as you are using simple templates like the one shown. (If you are doing template metaprogramming, yeah, then you can start worrying.)

Now, the memory usage: By the compiler during compilation or by the generated executable at run time? For the former, same holds as for the compilation time. For the latter: Inlined lamdas and function objects are the winners.

Can we say that in many circumstances std::function (or even function pointers) must be preferred over templates+raw functors/lambdas? I.e. wrapping your functor or lambda with std::function may be very convenient.

I am not quite sure how to answer to that one. I cannot define "many circumstances".

However, one thing I can say for sure is that type erasure is a way to avoid / reduce code bloat due to templates, see Item 44: Factor parameter-independent code out of templates in Effective C++. By the way, std::function uses type erasure internally. So yes, code bloat is an issue.

I am aware that std::function (function pointer too) introduces an overhead. Is it worth it?

"Want speed? Measure." (Howard Hinnant)

One more thing: function calls through function pointers can be inlined (even across compilation units!). Here is a proof:

#include <cstdio>

bool lt_func(int a, int b) 
{
    return a<b;
}

void compare_int(int a, int b, const char* msg, bool (*cmp_func) (int a, int b)) {
    if (cmp_func(a, b)) printf("a is %s b\n", msg);
    else printf("a is not %s b\n", msg);
}

void f() {
  compare_int (10, 5, "less than", lt_func); 
}

This is a slightly modified version of your code. I removed all the iostream stuff because it makes the generated assembly cluttered. Here is the assembly of f():

.LC1:
    .string "a is not %s b\n"
[...]
.LC2:
    .string "less than"
[...]
f():
.LFB33:
    .cfi_startproc
    movl    $.LC2, %edx
    movl    $.LC1, %esi
    movl    $1, %edi
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    jmp __printf_chk
    .cfi_endproc

Which means, that gcc 4.7.2 inlined lt_func at -O3. In fact, the generated assembly code is optimal.

I have also checked: I moved the implementation of lt_func into a separate source file and enabled link time optimization (-flto). GCC still happily inlined the call through the function pointer! It is nontrivial and you need a quality compiler to do that.


Just for the record, and that you can actually feel the overhead of the std::function approach:

This code:

#include <cstdio>
#include <functional>

template <class Compare> void compare_int(int a, int b, const char* msg, Compare cmp_func) 
{
    if (cmp_func(a, b)) printf("a is %s b\n", msg);
    else printf("a is not %s b\n", msg);
}

void f() {
  std::function<bool(int,int)> func_lt = [](int a, int b) {return a<b;};
  compare_int (10, 5, "less than", func_lt); 
}

yields this assembly at -O3 (approx. 140 lines):

f():
.LFB498:
    .cfi_startproc
    .cfi_personality 0x3,__gxx_personality_v0
    .cfi_lsda 0x3,.LLSDA498
    pushq   %rbx
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    .cfi_offset 3, -16
    movl    $1, %edi
    subq    $80, %rsp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 96
    movq    %fs:40, %rax
    movq    %rax, 72(%rsp)
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    movq    std::_Function_handler<bool (int, int), f()::{lambda(int, int)#1}>::_M_invoke(std::_Any_data const&, int, int), 24(%rsp)
    movq    std::_Function_base::_Base_manager<f()::{lambda(int, int)#1}>::_M_manager(std::_Any_data&, std::_Function_base::_Base_manager<f()::{lambda(int, int)#1}> const&, std::_Manager_operation), 16(%rsp)
.LEHB0:
    call    operator new(unsigned long)
.LEHE0:
    movq    %rax, (%rsp)
    movq    16(%rsp), %rax
    movq    $0, 48(%rsp)
    testq   %rax, %rax
    je  .L14
    movq    24(%rsp), %rdx
    movq    %rax, 48(%rsp)
    movq    %rsp, %rsi
    leaq    32(%rsp), %rdi
    movq    %rdx, 56(%rsp)
    movl    $2, %edx
.LEHB1:
    call    *%rax
.LEHE1:
    cmpq    $0, 48(%rsp)
    je  .L14
    movl    $5, %edx
    movl    $10, %esi
    leaq    32(%rsp), %rdi
.LEHB2:
    call    *56(%rsp)
    testb   %al, %al
    movl    $.LC0, %edx
    jne .L49
    movl    $.LC2, %esi
    movl    $1, %edi
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    call    __printf_chk
.LEHE2:
.L24:
    movq    48(%rsp), %rax
    testq   %rax, %rax
    je  .L23
    leaq    32(%rsp), %rsi
    movl    $3, %edx
    movq    %rsi, %rdi
.LEHB3:
    call    *%rax
.LEHE3:
.L23:
    movq    16(%rsp), %rax
    testq   %rax, %rax
    je  .L12
    movl    $3, %edx
    movq    %rsp, %rsi
    movq    %rsp, %rdi
.LEHB4:
    call    *%rax
.LEHE4:
.L12:
    movq    72(%rsp), %rax
    xorq    %fs:40, %rax
    jne .L50
    addq    $80, %rsp
    .cfi_remember_state
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 16
    popq    %rbx
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    ret
    .p2align 4,,10
    .p2align 3
.L49:
    .cfi_restore_state
    movl    $.LC1, %esi
    movl    $1, %edi
    xorl    %eax, %eax
.LEHB5:
    call    __printf_chk
    jmp .L24
.L14:
    call    std::__throw_bad_function_call()
.LEHE5:
.L32:
    movq    48(%rsp), %rcx
    movq    %rax, %rbx
    testq   %rcx, %rcx
    je  .L20
    leaq    32(%rsp), %rsi
    movl    $3, %edx
    movq    %rsi, %rdi
    call    *%rcx
.L20:
    movq    16(%rsp), %rax
    testq   %rax, %rax
    je  .L29
    movl    $3, %edx
    movq    %rsp, %rsi
    movq    %rsp, %rdi
    call    *%rax
.L29:
    movq    %rbx, %rdi
.LEHB6:
    call    _Unwind_Resume
.LEHE6:
.L50:
    call    __stack_chk_fail
.L34:
    movq    48(%rsp), %rcx
    movq    %rax, %rbx
    testq   %rcx, %rcx
    je  .L20
    leaq    32(%rsp), %rsi
    movl    $3, %edx
    movq    %rsi, %rdi
    call    *%rcx
    jmp .L20
.L31:
    movq    %rax, %rbx
    jmp .L20
.L33:
    movq    16(%rsp), %rcx
    movq    %rax, %rbx
    testq   %rcx, %rcx
    je  .L29
    movl    $3, %edx
    movq    %rsp, %rsi
    movq    %rsp, %rdi
    call    *%rcx
    jmp .L29
    .cfi_endproc

Which approach would you like to choose when it comes to performance?

share|improve this answer
    
Why are lambdas and functors the winners in terms of run time memory usage? 100 lambdas mean 100 template instances (even if all the functors or lambdas have the same signature). 100 std::function would mean only one template instance (or actually two, std::function template and the template you are using the "wrapped" function with). I am assuming all functors/lambdas/etc have the same signature so only one std::function template instantiation is enough. –  jbgs Jan 15 at 0:58
    
@jbgs Please re-read my answer, especially the paragraph in which I refer to Item 44 of Effective C++. The problem of code bloat due to templates is well-known; see also a slightly outdated, 12 years old discussion Code Bloat Due to Templates. If you have facts to support that code bloat is an issue for you (e.g. you checked the assembly code) then type erasure is one way to go. You can achieve that by passing a std::function (ca. 140 lines of assembly code) or a function pointer (5 lines of assembly code). –  Ali Jan 15 at 11:12
    
@jbgs Here is a really rough estimate: based on the length of the assembly for the std::function() approach: You would have to have (140/5=)28 template instantiations to generate the same amount of assembly code. Of course this is just a crude and quite questionable estimate but still, it shows that std::function() is very expensive both in terms of generated code and in execution time. So, even if you get the code bloat (if you get it at all), it takes many many template instantiations until std::function() becomes preferable. But as I said before, code bloat is a known issue. –  Ali Jan 15 at 11:19
    
@jbgs OK, I see you did some measurements. Good. And it is in agreement with what I have just written. –  Ali Jan 15 at 11:32

If you bind your lambda to a std::function then your code will run slower because it will no longer be inlineable, invoking goes through function pointer and creation of the function object possibly requires a heap allocation if the size of the lambda (= size of captured state) exceeds the small buffer limit (which is equal to the size of one or two pointers on GCC IIRC).

If you keep your lambda, e.g. auto a = []{};, then it will be as fast as an inlineable function (perhaps even faster because there's no conversion to function pointer when passed as an argument to a function.)

The object code generated by lambda and inlineable function objects will be zero when compiling with optimizations enabled (-O1 or higher in my tests). Occasionally the compiler may refuse to inline but that normally only happens when trying to inline big function bodies.

You can always look at the generated assembly if you want to be certain.

share|improve this answer
    
This is my intention. In (C) I want only one instance of the template to be compiled. What happens if I use auto? I would say we would have two different template parameters. Correct me if I'm wrong, please. –  jbgs Jan 14 at 22:54
    
Each lambda will have unique type and this may increase the build cost a little. But I don't think it will be significant. (Slow builds are usually the result of including too many headers or doing intensive compile time calculations.) Note: this cost only affects the build times, not the runtime speed. –  StackedCrooked Jan 14 at 23:02
    
I agree, but that's what I wanted to compare :) It's not significant for this naive example. But it could be in some scenarios (memory usage of several compilations vs overhead introduced by raw pointers or std::function. –  jbgs Jan 14 at 23:05
    
Keep in mind that including <functional> and binding a lambda to a std::function will also have a compile-time cost. –  StackedCrooked Jan 14 at 23:07
1  
Look at the assembly code of this little program. The only number you see in the output is 11111, because the compiler deduced that this was the answer. All the other numbers are gone. Also there's no object code generated for the lambdas. There is no overhead. –  StackedCrooked Jan 14 at 23:31

I will discuss what happens naively, and common optimizations.

(A) Function Template + functors

In this case, there will be one functor whose type and arguments fully describes what happens when you invoke (). There will be one instance of the template function per functor passed to it.

While the functor has a minimium size of 1 byte, and must technically be copied, the copy is a no-op (not even the 1 byte of space need be copied: a dumb compiler/low optimization settings may result in it being copied anyhow).

Optimizing the existance of that functor object away is an easy thing for compilers to do: the method is inline and has the same symbol name, so this will even happen over multiple compilation units. Inlining the call is also very easy.

If you had multiple function objects with the same implementation, havine one instance of the functor despite this takes a bit of effort, but some compilers can do it. Inlining the template functions may also be easy. In your toy example, as the inputs are known at compile time, branches can be evaluated at compile time, dead code eliminated, and everything reduced to a single std::cout call.

(B) Function template + lambdas

In this case, each lambda is its own type, and each closure instance is an undefined size instance of that lambda (usually 1 byte as it captures nothing). If an identical lambda is defined and used at different spots, these are different types. Each call location for the function object is a distinct instantiation of the template function.

Removing the existance of the 1 byte closures, assuming they are stateless, is easy. Inlining them is also easy. Removing duplicate instances of the template function with the same implementation but different signature is harder, but some compilers will do it. Inlining said functions is no harder than above. In your toy example, as the inputs are known at compile time, branches can be evaluated at compile time, dead code eliminated, and everything reduced to a single std::cout call.

(C) Function template + std::function

std::function is a type erasure object. An instance of std::function with a given signature has the same type as another. However, the constructor for std::function is templated on the type passed in. In your case, you are passing in a lambda -- so each location where you initialize a std::function with a lambda generates a distinct std::function constructor, which does unknown code.

A typical implementation of std::function will use the pImpl pattern to store a pointer to the abstract interface to a helper object that wraps your callable, and knows how to copy/move/call it with the std::function signature. One such callable type is created per type std::function is constructed from per std::function signature it is constructed to.

One instance of the function will be created, taking a std::function.

Some compilers can notice duplicate methods and use the same implementation for both, and maybe pull of a similar trick for (much) of their virtual function table (but not all, as dynamic casting requires they be different). This is less likely to happen than the earlier duplicate function elimination. The code in the duplicated methods used by the std::function helper is probably simpler than other duplicated functions, so that could be cheaper.

While the template function can be inlined, I am not aware of a C++ compiler that can optimize the existance of a std::function away, as they are usually implemented as library solutions consisting of relatively complex and opaque code to the compiler. So while theoretically it could be evaluated as all information is there, in practice the std::function will not be inlined into the template function, and no dead code elimination will occur. Both branches will make it into the resulting binary, together with a pile of std::function boilerplate for itself and its helper.

Calling a std::function is roughly as expensive as making a virtual method call -- or, as a rule of thumb, very roughly as expensive as two function pointer calls.

(D) Raw "C-style" pointers

A function is created, its address taken, this address is passed to compare_int. It then dereferences that pointer to find the actual function, and calls it.

Some compilers are good at noticing that the function pointer is created from a literal, then inlining the call here: not all compilers can do this, and no or few compilers can do this in the general case. If they cannot (because the initialization isn't from a literal, because the interface is in one compilation unit while the implementation is in another) there is a significant cost to following a function pointer to data -- the computer tends to be unable to cache the location it is going to, so there is a pipeline stall.

Note that you can call the raw "C-style" pointers with stateless lambdas, as stateless lambdas implicitly convert to function pointers. Also note that this example is strictly weaker than the other ones: it does not accept stateful functions. The version with the same power would be a C-style function that takes both the pair of ints and a void* state.

share|improve this answer
    
I have just checked: I moved the comparator to a separate source file (cpp file) and only the declaration was available at the call site. GCC happily inlined the call through the function pointer when I enabled link time optimization (-flto). But I agree that it is nontrivial and you need a quality compiler to do this. Luckily, we have one. –  Ali Jan 15 at 12:29

You should use auto keyword with lambda functions, not std::function. That way you get unique type and no runtime overhead of std::function.

Also, as dyp suggests, stateless (that is, no captures) lamba functions can be converted to function pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
Am I not getting an unique type when using std::function? Template parameter is the same for both cases. –  jbgs Jan 14 at 22:44
    
If you want to minimize memory usage (one template instance), convert lambda to a function pointer (or use C-style function pointers - there is no difference). –  dsi Jan 14 at 22:55

In A, B and C you probably end up with a binary that does not contain a comparator, nor any templates. It will literally inline all of the comparison and probably even remove the non-true branch of the printing - in effect, it'll be "puts" calls for the actual result, without any checks left to do.

In D your compiler can't do that.

So rather, it's more optimal in this example. It's also more flexible - an std::function can hide members being stored, or it just being a plain C function, or it being a complex object. It even allows you to derive the implementation from aspects of the type - if you could do a more efficient comparison for POD types you can implement that and forget about it for the rest.

Think of it this way - A and B are higher abstract implementations that allow you to tell the compiler "This code is probably best implemented for each type separately, so do that for me when I use it". C is one that says "There'll be multiple comparison operators that are complex, but they'll all look like this so only make one implementation of the compare_int function". In D you tell it "Don't bother, just make me these functions. I know best." None is unequivocally better than the rest.

share|improve this answer
    
It is a naive example. I just used it to illustrate the four approaches. Obviously many things can be optimized away. –  jbgs Jan 14 at 22:48
    
You're trying to make a too-broad sweeping statements that is just plain not true. Read the last paragraph in my reply why not. –  dascandy Jan 14 at 22:49
    
I read it. Of course best approach depends on your particular circumstances. But maybe we can come up with some general guidelines. –  jbgs Jan 14 at 22:52
    
Best you can do is, if a flyswatter is enough don't use a tactical nuke. When a function pointer is enough for the variations you need, don't use std::function. –  dascandy Jan 14 at 22:54
1  
Dascandy, can you find me the compiler that will optimize the std::function in C away? –  Yakk Jan 15 at 1:30

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