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I'm given the following code to develop my own appointment book application:

#include<iostream> 
#include<string>
#include<vector>
#include "Appointment.h"
#include "OneTime.h"
#include "Daily.h"
#include "Monthly.h"
#include "Yearly.h"
using namespace std;

void checkAppointments(vector<Appointment*>& apptbook){
   // STATEMENTS
}
void addAppointment(vector<Appointment*>& apptbook){
  // STATEMENTS
}


int main(){

  vector<Appointment*> apptbook;

  char option;

  do {
     cout << "********** Appointment Book Application ************" << endl<< endl;
     cout << "(a) See all appointments on a given day." << endl;
     cout << "(b) Add an appointment." << endl << endl;
     cout << "Enter an option or 'q' to quit: ";

     cin >> option;
     switch(option){
        case 'a': 
            checkAppointments(apptbook);
            break;
        case 'b':
            addAppointment(apptbook);
             break;
        case 'q':
             break;
        default:
            cout << "You entered an invalid option.  Try again!";    
     }
     cout << endl;
  }
  while(option != 'q');

  // Cleaning up 

  for(int i = 0; i < apptbook.size(); i++){
    delete apptbook[i];
  }
  apptbook.clear();

  system("PAUSE");
  return 0;
}

I'm asked to use some of the parameters of the below specified Appointment constructor to construct the date member it the Appointment class contained in Appointment.h file:

Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min)

Here is what I've done so far in Appointment.h vis-a-vis defining the constructor in the requested way:

#ifndef APPOINTMENT_H
#define APPOINTMENT_H

#include<string>
#include<sstream>
#include "Date.h"
using namespace std;

class Appointment{

  public:
    Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min);
    Date date;

  private:
    int hour;
    int minute;
    string convertInt( int number ) const;
};
Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min) : public date(month, day, yr)
{
    this->description = description;
}
string Appointment::convertInt( int number ) const
{
    stringstream ss;
    ss << number;
    return ss.str();
}

#endif

I suppose my question goes something like this: "How do I use some of Appointment's parameters to construct the date member it its initializer list?" This concept is new to me, and I'm having some trouble. Here is the Date.h and Date.cpp:

Date.h

#ifndef DATE_H
#define DATE_H

#include<string>
using namespace std;

class Date{

  public:
    Date(int month, int day, int year);

    int getMonth() const;
    int getDay() const; 
    int getYear() const;

  private:
    int month;
    int day;
    int year;
};

#endif

Date.cpp

#include "Date.h"
#include<string>
using namespace std;

Date::Date(int month, int day, int year) {
    this->month = month; 
    this->day = day;
    this->year = year;
}

int Date::getMonth() const{
  return month;
}

int Date::getDay() const{
  return day;
}

int Date::getYear() const{
  return year;
}
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2 Answers 2

just remove the public keyword from the Appointment constructer and why did you put the function defintion in the header file?

#ifndef APPOINTMENT_H
#define APPOINTMENT_H

#include<string>
#include<sstream>
#include "Date.h"
using namespace std;

class Appointment{

  public:
    Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min);
    Date date;

  private:
    int hour;
    int minute;
    string convertInt( int number ) const;
};
Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min) : date(month, day, yr)
{
    this->description = description;
}
string Appointment::convertInt( int number ) const
{
    stringstream ss;
    ss << number;
    return ss.str();
}

#endif
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The constructor definition is wrong:

Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min) : public date(month, day, yr)
{
    this->description = description;
}

You should add Appointement:: as a prefix and remove the public keyword there:

Appointment::Appointment(string description, int month, int day, int yr, int hr, int min) : date(month, day, yr)
{
    this->description = description;
}

Also, please learn to use the std:: prefix instead of blindly add using namespace std;. That's not what namespaces are there for.

Another potential problem arises when you are using dynamic allocation for the vector in:

vector<Appointment*> apptbook;

There's no need for that. You can just use:

std::vector<Appointment> apptbook;

and populate it in addAppointment like this:

void addAppointment(std::vector<Appointment>& apptbook){
    // calculate arguments
    apptbook.emplace_back(description, month, day, yr, hr, min);
}

In this way you can get rid of the useless:

for(int i = 0; i < apptbook.size(); i++){
    delete apptbook[i];
}
apptbook.clear();

altogether.

But if you really need to use dynamic allocation in this case, at least learn to use std::unique_ptr or std::shared_ptr (in this order).

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