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I am using Java Callable Future in my code. Below is my main code which uses the future and callables -

public class TimeoutThread {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        // starting the background thread
        new ScheduledCall().startScheduleTask();

        ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);
        Future<String> future = executor.submit(new Task());

        try {
            System.out.println("Started..");
            System.out.println(future.get(3, TimeUnit.SECONDS));
            System.out.println("Finished!");
        } catch (TimeoutException e) {
            System.out.println("Terminated!");
        }

        executor.shutdownNow();
    }
}

Below is my Task class which implements the Callable interface and this class needs to get the data from the ClientData class method. And I have a background thread which is setting the data in ClientData class by using the setters.

class Task implements Callable<String> {

    public String call() throws Exception {

    //.. some code

    String hostname = ClientData.getPrimaryMapping("some_string").get(some_number);

    //.. some code
    }
}

Below is my background thread which is setting the value in my ClientData class by parsing the data coming from the URL and it is running every 10 minutes.

public class ScheduledCall {

    private final ScheduledExecutorService scheduler = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(1);

    public void startScheduleTask() {

        final ScheduledFuture<?> taskHandle = scheduler.scheduleAtFixedRate(
                new Runnable() {
                    public void run() {
                        try {
                            callServers();
                        } catch(Exception ex) {
                            ex.printStackTrace();
                        }
                    }
                }, 0, 10, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
    }

    private void callServers() {
        String url = "url";
        RestTemplate restTemplate = new RestTemplate();
        String response = restTemplate.getForObject(url, String.class);
        parseResponse(response);

    }

    // parse the response and set it.
    private void parseResponse(String response) {
        //...       
        ConcurrentHashMap<String, Map<Integer, String>> primaryTables = null;

        //...

        // store the data in ClientData class variables which can be
        // used by other threads
        ClientData.setPrimaryMapping(primaryTables);        
    }
}

And below is my ClientData class

public class ClientData {

    private static final AtomicReference<Map<String, Map<Integer, String>>> primaryMapping = new AtomicReference<>();

    public static Map<String, Map<Integer, String>> getPrimaryMapping() {
        return primaryMapping.get();
    }

    public static void setPrimaryMapping(Map<String, Map<Integer, String>> map) {
        primaryMapping.set(map);
    }
}

PROBLEM STATEMENT:-

The only problem I am facing is, whenever I am starting the program for the first time, what will happen is, it will start the background thread which will parse the data coming from the URL. And simultaneously, it will go into call method of my Task class. And the below line will throw an exception, why? bcoz my background thread is still parsing the data and it hasn't set that variable.

String hostname = ClientData.getPrimaryMapping("some_string").get(some_number);

How do I avoid this problem? Is there any better and efficient way to do this?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You just want to make the Task wait until the first update to the Map has happened before proceeding?

public class ClientData {

    private static final AtomicReference<Map<String, Map<Integer, String>>> primaryMapping = new AtomicReference<>();
    private static final CountDownLatch hasBeenInitialized = new CountDownLatch(1);

    public static Map<String, Map<Integer, String>> getPrimaryMapping() {
        try {
            hasBeenInitialized.await();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            throw new IllegalStateException(e);
        }
        return primaryMapping.get();
    }

    public static void setPrimaryMapping(Map<String, Map<Integer, String>> map) {
        primaryMapping.set(map);
        hasBeenInitialized.countDown();
    }
}

A simpler and more efficient way that doesn't cause synchronization checks and make you deal with stupid InterruptedException being a Checked Exception might be to simply load initial values into the Map before firing up the multi-threaded engines.....

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You. Suppose if I have more than one fields in the ClientData class, then I need to do the same thing in all those getters and setters with what you did in your suggestion? –  AKIWEB Jan 15 '14 at 0:53
    
That is one option, yes. Not knowing what the program actually does, I would personally probably just load some initial values at that point though. –  Affe Jan 15 '14 at 0:56
    
Sure make sense.. I cannot initialize the value once I am starting the application for some reason. One more thing in this scenario, my main thread will always wait while I am retrieving the value from getPrimaryMapping or it will only wait for the first time when I am starting my application?Sorry if I am asking silly question. This is the first time I am working with CountDownLatch so don't know much about it.. If you can explain me how this will work in my current scenario, I will be able to understand how CountDownLatch is working.. Thanks.. –  AKIWEB Jan 15 '14 at 6:46
    
Any thread that calls getPrimaryMapping will block indefinitely until some other thread has called setPrimaryMapping. The once set has been called at least once no more blocking will happen. –  Affe Jan 15 '14 at 16:07
    
Thank You Affe. Just a random question. Will this work with synchronized method as well? Suppose if I am putting synchronized getter and setter methods instead of using CountDownLatch. Then will it work? –  AKIWEB Jan 16 '14 at 21:40

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