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My following code is working fine. But I have little doubt, please see //Comment1 and //Comment2

#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

struct PTR
{
    int (*funptr)(int);
};

int fun1(int)
{
    printf("Fun1\n");
    return 0;
}

int fun2(int)
{
    printf("Fun2\n");
    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    PTR p;
    p.funptr = &fun1; //Comment1
    p.funptr(5);

    printf("\n");

    p.funptr = fun2; //Comment2
    p.funptr(5);


  return 0;

}

Output : Fun1 Fun2

There is no problem in output.

At comment1 '&' opertor is used, so we are expllicing telling to get address, in comment2, we are not using '&', so which one is correct way?

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marked as duplicate by Joseph Quinsey, Ian Kemp, Günter Zöchbauer, jww, Anatoliy Nikolaev Jan 15 '14 at 7:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
How can you declare PTR p in main function without using struct name or typedef? –  Raghu Srikanth Reddy Jan 15 '14 at 6:56
    
@RaghuSrikanthReddy PTR is name of structure. (struct PTR) –  Pranit Kothari Jan 15 '14 at 7:02
    
But, Did this code compile? You neither typecasted nor used struct before PTR. –  Raghu Srikanth Reddy Jan 15 '14 at 7:19
    
@RaghuSrikanthReddy Code is compiled using Visual Studio. And there should not be any reason not to compile this code. You are creating Structure PTR ,and using it. Just to clarify, is it necessary in C++ to typedef a class, no. And class and struct are very same just with one little difference. –  Pranit Kothari Jan 15 '14 at 7:27
1  
I compiled this code using gcc. and this question is tagged C, not C++. –  Raghu Srikanth Reddy Jan 15 '14 at 7:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

'&' is optional when taking the address of function。

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Here,

p.funptr = &fun1 we are giving the address of the function. So '&' here is optional as p.funptr = fun1 also assign address of function.

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