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I am trying to find frequency of characters in file using Haskell. I want to be able to handle files ~500MB size.

What I've tried till now

  1. It does the job but is a bit slow as it parses the file 256 times

    calculateFrequency :: L.ByteString -> [(Word8, Int64)]
    calculateFrequency f = foldl (\acc x -> (x, L.count x f):acc) [] [255, 254.. 0]
    
  2. I have also tried using Data.Map but the program runs out of memory (in ghc interpreter).

    import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as L
    import qualified Data.Map as M
    
    calculateFrequency' :: L.ByteString -> [(Word8, Int64)]
    calculateFrequency' xs = M.toList $ L.foldl' (\m word -> M.insertWith (+) word 1 m) (M.empty) xs
    
share|improve this question
    
What happens if you compile with ghc -O2? Strictness optimisations that might avoid the memory issue may only kick in then. –  Ganesh Sittampalam Jan 15 at 8:12
    
Still going out of memory. –  Ravi Upadhyay Jan 15 at 8:19
1  
What if you switch to Data.Map.Strict: hackage.haskell.org/package/containers-0.5.0.0/docs/… –  Ganesh Sittampalam Jan 15 at 8:23
    
and beyond that, perhaps use an IntMap (you'll need to convert Word8 to Int, but that should be ok): hackage.haskell.org/package/containers-0.5.0.0/docs/… –  Ganesh Sittampalam Jan 15 at 8:24
    
@GaneshSittampalam it's not running out of memory but still very slow. –  Ravi Upadhyay Jan 15 at 8:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here's an implementation using mutable, unboxed vectors instead of higher level constructs. It also uses conduit for reading the file to avoid lazy I/O.

import           Control.Monad.IO.Class
import qualified Data.ByteString             as S
import           Data.Conduit
import           Data.Conduit.Binary         as CB
import qualified Data.Conduit.List           as CL
import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed.Mutable as VM
import           Data.Word                   (Word8)

type Freq = VM.IOVector Int

newFreq :: MonadIO m => m Freq
newFreq = liftIO $ VM.replicate 256 0

printFreq :: MonadIO m => Freq -> m ()
printFreq freq =
    liftIO $ mapM_ go [0..255]
  where
    go i = do
        x <- VM.read freq i
        putStrLn $ show i ++ ": " ++ show x

addFreqWord8 :: MonadIO m => Freq -> Word8 -> m ()
addFreqWord8 f w = liftIO $ do
    let index = fromIntegral w
    oldCount <- VM.read f index
    VM.write f index (oldCount + 1)

addFreqBS :: MonadIO m => Freq -> S.ByteString -> m ()
addFreqBS f bs =
    loop (S.length bs - 1)
  where
    loop (-1) = return ()
    loop i = do
        addFreqWord8 f (S.index bs i)
        loop (i - 1)

-- | The main entry point.
main :: IO ()
main = do
    freq <- newFreq
    runResourceT
        $  sourceFile "random"
        $$ CL.mapM_ (addFreqBS freq)
    printFreq freq

I ran this on 500MB of random data and compared with @josejuan's UArray-based answer:

  • conduit based/mutable vectors: 1.006s
  • UArray: 17.962s

I think it should be possible to keep much of the elegance of josejuan's high-level approach yet keep the speed of the mutable vector implementation, but I haven't had a chance to try implementing something like that yet. Also, note that with some general purpose helper functions (like Data.ByteString.mapM or Data.Conduit.Binary.mapM) the implementation could be significantly simpler without affecting performance.

You can play with this implementation on FP Haskell Center as well.

EDIT: I added one of those missing functions to conduit and cleaned up the code a bit; it now looks like the following:

import           Control.Monad.Trans.Class   (lift)
import           Data.ByteString             (ByteString)
import           Data.Conduit                (Consumer, ($$))
import qualified Data.Conduit.Binary         as CB
import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed         as V
import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed.Mutable as VM
import           System.IO                   (stdin)

freqSink :: Consumer ByteString IO (V.Vector Int)
freqSink = do
    freq <- lift $ VM.replicate 256 0
    CB.mapM_ $ \w -> do
        let index = fromIntegral w
        oldCount <- VM.read freq index
        VM.write freq index (oldCount + 1)
    lift $ V.freeze freq

main :: IO ()
main = (CB.sourceHandle stdin $$ freqSink) >>= print

The only difference in functionality is how the frequency is printed.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any reason to use the MonadIO class rather than specializing to whatever type runResourceT expects? Does it have any performance impact? –  Chris Taylor Jan 15 at 10:48
    
Very nice (impressive) solution! –  josejuan Jan 15 at 11:27
    
@ChrisTaylor No, you could have it specialized to ResourceT IO. Or if you wanted, you can get rid of the ResourceT usage entirely, it just makes the code slightly longer: gist.github.com/snoyberg/8436149 –  Michael Snoyman Jan 15 at 13:26

@Alex answer is good but, with only 256 values (indexes) an array should be better

import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as L
import qualified Data.Array.Unboxed as A
import qualified Data.ByteString as B
import Data.Int
import Data.Word

fq :: L.ByteString -> A.UArray Word8 Int64
fq = A.accumArray (+) 0 (0, 255) . map (\c -> (c, 1)) . concat . map B.unpack . L.toChunks

main = L.getContents >>= print . fq

@alex code take (for my sample file) 24.81 segs, using array take 7.77 segs.

UPDATED:

although Snoyman solution is better, an improvement avoiding unpack maybe

fq :: L.ByteString -> A.UArray Word8 Int64
fq = A.accumArray (+) 0 (0, 255) . toCounterC . L.toChunks
     where toCounterC [] = []
           toCounterC (x:xs) = toCounter x (B.length x) xs
           toCounter  _ 0 xs = toCounterC xs
           toCounter  x i xs = (B.index x i', 1): toCounter x i' xs
                               where i' = i - 1

with ~50% speedup.

UPDATED:

Using IOVector as Snoyman is as Conduit version (a bit faster really, but this is a raw code, better use Conduit)

import           Data.Int
import           Data.Word
import           Control.Monad.IO.Class
import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy          as L
import qualified Data.Array.Unboxed            as A
import qualified Data.ByteString               as B
import qualified Data.Vector.Unboxed.Mutable   as V

fq :: L.ByteString -> IO (V.IOVector Int64)
fq xs =
     do
       v <- V.replicate 256 0 :: IO (V.IOVector Int64)
       g v $ L.toChunks xs
       return v
     where g v = toCounterC
                 where toCounterC [] = return ()
                       toCounterC (x:xs) = toCounter x (B.length x) xs
                       toCounter  _ 0 xs = toCounterC xs
                       toCounter  x i xs = do
                                             let i' = i - 1
                                                 w  = fromIntegral $ B.index x i'
                                             c <- V.read v w
                                             V.write v w (c + 1)
                                             toCounter x i' xs

main = do
          v <- L.getContents >>= fq
          mapM_ (\i -> V.read v i >>= liftIO . putStr . (++", ") . show) [0..255]
share|improve this answer

This works for me on my computer:

module Main where
import qualified Data.HashMap.Strict as M
import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as L
import Data.Word
import Data.Int

calculateFrequency :: L.ByteString -> [(Word8, Int64)]
calculateFrequency xs = M.toList $ L.foldl' (\m word -> M.insertWith (+) word 1 m) M.empty xs

main = do
    bs <- L.readFile "E:\\Steam\\SteamApps\\common\\Sid Meier's Civilization V\\Assets\\DLC\\DLC_Deluxe\\Behind the Scenes\\Behind the Scenes.wmv"
    print (calculateFrequency bs)

Doesn't run out of memory, or even load the whole file in, but takes forever (about a minute) on 600mb+ files! I compiled this using ghc 7.6.3.

I should point out that the code is basically identical save for the strict HashMap instead of the lazy Map.

Note that insertWith is twice as fast with HashMap than Map in this case. On my machine, the code as written executes in 54 seconds, while the version using Map takes 107.

share|improve this answer
    
You can use Data.Map.Strict (the only change needed on original source code) –  josejuan Jan 15 at 8:45
    
^ You can, but you shouldn't. I just updated my answer with some runtime info. –  Alex Reinking Jan 15 at 8:48
    
Then, you shouldn't use HashMap, use STArray (MArray...) :) –  josejuan Jan 15 at 8:49
    
Yeah, probably :) If we really want to go down the rabbit hole, check out Data.HashTable.ST.Cuckoo –  Alex Reinking Jan 15 at 8:54
2  
I'm going to hazard a 'no'. But it's about as fast as it will be while being this terse. You'll have to use either the IO or ST monad to get O(1) lookups/inserts. –  Alex Reinking Jan 15 at 9:04

My two cents (using an STUArray). Can't compare it to other solutions here. Someone might be willing to try it...

module Main where

import Data.Array.ST (runSTUArray, newArray, readArray, writeArray)
import Data.Array.Unboxed (UArray)
import qualified Data.ByteString.Lazy as L (ByteString, unpack, getContents)
import Data.Word
import Data.Int
import Control.Monad (forM_)

calculateFrequency :: L.ByteString -> UArray Word8 Int64 
calculateFrequency bs = runSTUArray $ do
    a <- newArray (0, 255) 0
    forM_ (L.unpack bs) $ \i -> readArray a i >>= writeArray a i . succ
    return a

main = L.getContents >>= print . calculateFrequency
share|improve this answer

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