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I would like to get your help in writing a script to count number of common set of numbers in two files. My files have format as shown below,

File 1

0: 152 145 148
1: 251 280 428
2: 42 281 407
3: 289 292 331
4: 309 212 226
5: 339 336 376
6: 339 376 380
7: 41 406 205
8: 237 418 193

File 2

0: 251 280 428
1: 309 212 226
2: 339 336 376
3: 339 376 380
4: 420 414 199
5: 418 193 237
6: 203 195 200
7: 287 161 257
8: 287 257 158
9: 263 369 15
10: 285 323 327

First column is just the serial numbers and should be ignored while checking the match between two files and set of same numbers with different ordering should be counted as common one (for e.g 237 418 193 = 418 193 237)

In this case, expected outcome will be.....

5 # no. of common sets
251 280 428
309 212 226
339 336 376
339 376 380
237 418 193

I have tried with an awk script -

awk 'FNR==NR{a[$3]=$0;next}{if(b=a[$3]){print b}}' file1 file2

Unfortunately, the set "237 418 193" didn't count since it have different ordering in the second file (418 193 237).

Can any help me to do this task with a awk or Python script.

Any help is appreciated?

share|improve this question
    
The trick is to sort every set by increasing values to standardize the order. – Yves Daoust Jan 15 '14 at 8:32
    
I wrote a script a while ago to help me work with lines of a file as sets. The code is at github.com/nibrahim/lines. It sounds like you might be able to use it after some preprocessing (losing the serial numbers). – Noufal Ibrahim Jan 15 '14 at 9:04

Parse the file, creating a set of lines, each element sorted lexicographically.

file1_sets = {tuple(sorted(line.split()[1:])) for line in open(file1, 'r')}
file2_sets = {tuple(sorted(line.split()[1:])) for line in open(file2, 'r')}

Then see how many of one exist in the other

count = sum([f in file2_sets for f in file1_sets])

(Edited per comments)

share|improve this answer
    
You should not include the ids (first column of the files) in your sets – Daniel Jan 15 '14 at 8:28
    
@Daniel thanks, fixed – mhlester Jan 15 '14 at 8:30
    
Yo have unneeded additions here - f in file2_sets for f in file1_sets will do the job – volcano Jan 15 '14 at 9:04
    
@volcano, brilliant, thank you! I love how your change mostly just rearranged the words that were already there. – mhlester Jan 15 '14 at 16:40
    
@mhlester, I just used the fact that integer values of True and False are 1 and 0 respectively. Glad to help – volcano Jan 15 '14 at 18:30

Try this python code:

data1, data2 = [], []
for fname, data in [('file1.txt', data1), ('file2.txt', data2)]:
    for line in open(fname):
        data.append(set(line.strip().split()[1:]))

common = [s for s in data1 if s in data2]
for c in common:
    print c
print len(common)

Output:

set(['280', '251', '428'])
set(['309', '212', '226'])
set(['336', '339', '376'])
set(['380', '339', '376'])
set(['237', '418', '193'])
5
share|improve this answer

Using sets and .intersection:

with open("21132195_1.txt") as fh1, open("21132195_2.txt") as fh2:
    number_sets1 = set(frozenset(line.split()[1:]) for line in fh1)
    number_sets2 = set(frozenset(line.split()[1:]) for line in fh2)

common_number_sets = number_sets1.intersection(number_sets2)

print "%i # no. of common sets" % len(common_number_sets)
print "\n".join([" ".join(s) for s in common_number_sets])

Will give as output:

5 # no. of common sets
339 376 380
251 280 428
212 226 309
193 237 418
336 339 376
share|improve this answer
    
I am just curious - why to you need calls to sorted and tuple? – volcano Jan 15 '14 at 9:11
    
sorted is needed to make all lines sorted ascending and to handle different ordering of numbers. tuple is needed as only hashable objects can be used in sets - and the resulting list is not hashable. – Thorsten Kranz Jan 15 '14 at 9:19
    
Sorry, missed that – volcano Jan 15 '14 at 9:24
    
No need to excuse... – Thorsten Kranz Jan 15 '14 at 9:29
1  
Just one correction - I was thinking of set of sets - and I've forgotten that set is not hashable. But there is hashable frozenset, so frozenset(line.split()[1:]). It is a little bit more readable than wrapping 2 function calls - and its is more efficent. Used over file1 as list of strings, it worked about 30% faster – volcano Jan 15 '14 at 9:36

In Gnu Awk version 4.1, you can use PROCINFO["sorted_in"] like:

gawk -f  c.awk file1 file2

where c.awk is:

BEGIN {PROCINFO["sorted_in"]="@val_num_asc"}
NR==FNR {
    b[getRow()]++
    next
}
{
    c=getRow()
    if (c in b)
        a[++j]=c
}
END{
    print j" # no. of common sets"
    for (i in a) 
        print a[i]
}

function getRow(b,d,i) {
    for (i=2; i<=NF; i++)
        d[i]=$i
    for (i in d)
        b=(b=="")?d[i]:(b" "d[i])
    return b
}

Output:

5 # no. of common sets
193 237 418
212 226 309
251 280 428
336 339 376
339 376 380
share|improve this answer
    
thank for the help. But when I used for a different input files ( with a similar file format as earlier), the program gives a wrong output. It suppose to find 7 common sets, but the output shows only 5 of them. – user3138998 Jan 16 '14 at 6:02
    
@user3138998 Can you paste the input files at pastebin.com ? Then I will check it out.. – Håkon Hægland Jan 16 '14 at 7:21

Another way using shell.

cat file1 file2 |while read x line  
do 
   arr2=($(for val in $line;do echo "$val";done|sort -n))
   echo "${arr2[@]}"
done|awk '++a[$1,$2,$3]>1'

251 280 428
212 226 309
336 339 376
339 376 380
193 237 418
share|improve this answer

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