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I am currently getting this error:

System.Data.SqlClient.SqlException: New transaction is not allowed because there are other threads running in the session.

while running this code:

public class ProductManager : IProductManager
{
    #region Declare Models
    private RivWorks.Model.Negotiation.RIV_Entities _dbRiv = RivWorks.Model.Stores.RivEntities(AppSettings.RivWorkEntities_connString);
    private RivWorks.Model.NegotiationAutos.RivFeedsEntities _dbFeed = RivWorks.Model.Stores.FeedEntities(AppSettings.FeedAutosEntities_connString);
    #endregion

    public IProduct GetProductById(Guid productId)
    {
        // Do a quick sync of the feeds...
        SyncFeeds();
        ...
        // get a product...
        ...
        return product;
    }

    private void SyncFeeds()
    {
        bool found = false;
        string feedSource = "AUTO";
        switch (feedSource) // companyFeedDetail.FeedSourceTable.ToUpper())
        {
            case "AUTO":
                var clientList = from a in _dbFeed.Client.Include("Auto") select a;
                foreach (RivWorks.Model.NegotiationAutos.Client client in clientList)
                {
                    var companyFeedDetailList = from a in _dbRiv.AutoNegotiationDetails where a.ClientID == client.ClientID select a;
                    foreach (RivWorks.Model.Negotiation.AutoNegotiationDetails companyFeedDetail in companyFeedDetailList)
                    {
                        if (companyFeedDetail.FeedSourceTable.ToUpper() == "AUTO")
                        {
                            var company = (from a in _dbRiv.Company.Include("Product") where a.CompanyId == companyFeedDetail.CompanyId select a).First();
                            foreach (RivWorks.Model.NegotiationAutos.Auto sourceProduct in client.Auto)
                            {
                                foreach (RivWorks.Model.Negotiation.Product targetProduct in company.Product)
                                {
                                    if (targetProduct.alternateProductID == sourceProduct.AutoID)
                                    {
                                        found = true;
                                        break;
                                    }
                                }
                                if (!found)
                                {
                                    var newProduct = new RivWorks.Model.Negotiation.Product();
                                    newProduct.alternateProductID = sourceProduct.AutoID;
                                    newProduct.isFromFeed = true;
                                    newProduct.isDeleted = false;
                                    newProduct.SKU = sourceProduct.StockNumber;
                                    company.Product.Add(newProduct);
                                }
                            }
                            _dbRiv.SaveChanges();  // ### THIS BREAKS ### //
                        }
                    }
                }
                break;
        }
    }
}

Model #1 - This model sits in a database on our Dev Server. Model #1

Model #2 - This model sits in a database on our Prod Server and is updated each day by automatic feeds. alt text

Note - The red circled items in Model #1 are the fields I use to "map" to Model #2. Please ignore the red circles in Model #2: that is from another question I had which is now answered.

Note: I still need to put in an isDeleted check so I can soft delete it from DB1 if it has gone out of our client's inventory.

All I want to do, with this particular code, is connect a company in DB1 with a client in DB2, get their product list from DB2 and INSERT it in DB1 if it is not already there. First time through should be a full pull of inventory. Each time it is run there after nothing should happen unless new inventory came in on the feed over night.

So the big question - how to I solve the transaction error I am getting? Do I need to drop and recreate my context each time through the loops (does not make sense to me)?

TIA

NOTE: Please look at the answer from Mark Stafford - MSFT below!

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1  
This is the most detailed question i've ever seen. –  user220583 Mar 25 '11 at 1:30
    
Anybody misses stored procedures yet ? –  David Sep 28 '13 at 17:48
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8 Answers

up vote 234 down vote accepted

After much pulling out of hair I discovered that the foreach loops were the culprits. What needs to happen is to call EF but return it into an IList<T> of that target type then loop on the IList<T>.

Example:

IList<Client> clientList = from a in _dbFeed.Client.Include("Auto") select a;
foreach (RivWorks.Model.NegotiationAutos.Client client in clientList)
{
   var companyFeedDetailList = from a in _dbRiv.AutoNegotiationDetails where a.ClientID == client.ClientID select a;
    // ...
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Yeah, this caused me a headache too. I almost fell off my chair when I found the problem! I understand the technical reasons behind the problem, but this isn't intuitive and it isn't helping the developer to fall into the "pit of success" blogs.msdn.com/brada/archive/2003/10/02/50420.aspx –  Doctor Jones May 21 '10 at 13:20
3  
Isn't that bad for performance for large datasets? If you have a millions records in the table. ToList() will suck them all into memory. I'm running into this very problem and was wondering whether the following would be feasible a)Detach the entity b)Create a new ObjectContext and attach the detached entity to it. c)Call SaveChanges() on the new ObjectContext d)Detach the entity from the new ObjectContext e)Attach it back to the old ObjectContext –  Abhijeet Patel Jun 4 '10 at 3:19
27  
The issue is that you can't call SaveChanges while you're still pulling results from the DB. Therefore another solution is just to save changes once the loop has completed. –  Drew Noakes Oct 3 '10 at 20:04
1  
Having been bitten also, I added this to Microsoft Connect: connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/612369/… Feel free to vote it up. –  Ian Mercer Oct 11 '10 at 0:33
11  
Our devs tend to append .ToList() to any LINQ query without thinking about the consequences. This must be the first time appending .ToList() is really useful! –  Marc Jul 13 '11 at 9:50
show 2 more comments

As you've already identified, you cannot save from within a foreach that is still drawing from the database via an active reader.

Calling ToList() or ToArray() is fine for small data sets, but when you have thousands of rows, you will be consuming a large amount of memory.

It's better to load the rows in chunks.

public static class EntityFrameworkUtil
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> QueryInChunksOf<T>(this IQueryable<T> queryable, int chunkSize)
    {
        return queryable.QueryChunksOfSize(chunkSize).SelectMany(chunk => chunk);
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T[]> QueryChunksOfSize<T>(this IQueryable<T> queryable, int chunkSize)
    {
        int chunkNumber = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            var query = (chunkNumber == 0)
                ? queryable 
                : queryable.Skip(chunkNumber * chunkSize);
            var chunk = query.Take(chunkSize).ToArray();
            if (chunk.Length == 0)
                yield break;
            yield return chunk;
            chunkNumber++;
        }
    }
}

Given the above extension methods, you can write your query like this:

foreach (var client in clientList.OrderBy(c => c.Id).QueryInChunksOf(100))
{
    // do stuff
    context.SaveChanges();
}

The queryable object you call this method on must be ordered. This is because Entity Framework only supports IQueryable<T>.Skip(int) on ordered queries, which makes sense when you consider that multiple queries for different ranges require the ordering to be stable. If the ordering isn't important to you, just order by primary key as that's likely to have a clustered index.

This version will query the database in batches of 100. Note that SaveChanges() is called for each entity.

If you want to improve your throughput dramatically, you should call SaveChanges() less frequently. Use code like this instead:

foreach (var chunk in clientList.OrderBy(c => c.Id).QueryChunksOfSize(100))
{
    foreach (var client in chunk)
    {
        // do stuff
    }
    context.SaveChanges();
}

This results in 100 times fewer database update calls. Of course each of those calls takes longer to complete, but you still come out way ahead in the end. Your mileage may vary, but this was worlds faster for me.

And it gets around the exception you were seeing.

EDIT I revisited this question after running SQL Profiler and updated a few things to improve performance. For anyone who is interested, here is some sample SQL that shows what is created by the DB.

The first loop doesn't need to skip anything, so is simpler.

SELECT TOP (100)                     -- the chunk size 
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
FROM [dbo].[Clients] AS [Extent1]
ORDER BY [Extent1].[Id] ASC

Subsequent calls need to skip previous chunks of results, so introduces usage of row_number:

SELECT TOP (100)                     -- the chunk size
[Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
FROM (
    SELECT [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], row_number()
    OVER (ORDER BY [Extent1].[Id] ASC) AS [row_number]
    FROM [dbo].[Clients] AS [Extent1]
) AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[row_number] > 100   -- the number of rows to skip
ORDER BY [Extent1].[Id] ASC
share|improve this answer
11  
Thanks. Your explanation was much more useful than the one marked as "Answered". –  wdanda Dec 2 '10 at 23:52
    
very neat and useful extension. thanks. –  mshsayem May 19 '11 at 5:38
2  
+1: Extension, one of its kind. Lovely! –  KMån Nov 2 '11 at 10:32
1  
+1 This is working for me. Great solution. Simple, elegant, clever. Thanks a bunch. –  Repo Man May 1 '12 at 21:37
    
+1 Your extension methods rock! –  Hari May 30 '13 at 10:50
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We have now posted an official response to the bug opened on Connect. The workarounds we recommend are as follows:

This error is due to Entity Framework creating an implicit transaction during the SaveChanges() call. The best way to work around the error is to use a different pattern (i.e., not saving while in the midst of reading) or by explicitly declaring a transaction. Here are three possible solutions:

// 1: Save after iteration (recommended approach in most cases)
using (var context = new MyContext())
{
    foreach (var person in context.People)
    {
        // Change to person
    }
    context.SaveChanges();
}

// 2: Declare an explicit transaction
using (var transaction = new TransactionScope())
{
    using (var context = new MyContext())
    {
        foreach (var person in context.People)
        {
            // Change to person
            context.SaveChanges();
        }
    }
    transaction.Complete();
}

// 3: Read rows ahead (Dangerous!)
using (var context = new MyContext())
{
    var people = context.People.ToList(); // Note that this forces the database
                                                         // to evaluate the query immediately
                                                        // and could be very bad for large tables.

    foreach (var person in people)
    {
        // Change to person
        context.SaveChanges();
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
4  
If you take the Transaction route, just throwing in a TransactionScope might not fix it - don't forget to extend the Timeout if what you're doing could take a long time - for example if you'll be interactively debugging the code making the DB call. Here's code extending the transaction timeout to an hour: using (var transaction = new TransactionScope(TransactionScopeOption.Required, new TimeSpan(1, 0, 0))) –  Chris Moschini Jun 6 '12 at 23:18
    
I've bumped into this error the very first time I have digressed from the "tutorial path" into a real example on my own! For me, however, the simpler solution, SAVE AFTER ITERATION, the better! (I think 99% of the times this is the case, and only 1% really MUST perform a database save INSIDE the loop) –  spiderman77 Dec 17 '12 at 15:45
    
second way not works for me in .NET 4 –  majidgeek Apr 6 '13 at 14:37
    
Gross. I just bumped into this error. Very nasty. The 2nd suggestion worked like a charm for me along with moving my SaveChanges into the loop. I thought having save changes outside of the loop was better for batching changes. But alright. I guess not?! :( –  Mr. Young Jul 11 '13 at 16:08
    
Did not work for me .NET 4.5. When used the TransactionScope I got the following error "The underlying provider failed on EnlistTransaction.{"The partner transaction manager has disabled its support for remote/network transactions. (Exception from HRESULT: 0x8004D025)"}". I end up doing the job outside the iteration. –  Diganta Kumar Oct 18 '13 at 4:16
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It's because you call context.SaveChanges() within your foreach loop, as previously noted, you should make the changes to the entity inside your foreach loop then call the SaveChanges() method of your DataContext just after your foreach loop.

foreach(var v in vv)
{
v.ID=xxxx;
v.fName=xxxx;
v.lName=xxxx;
}
context.SaveChanges();
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I was also facing same issue.

Here is the cause and solution.

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cbiyikoglu/archive/2006/11/21/mars-transactions-and-sql-error-3997-3988-or-3983.aspx

Make sure before firing data manipulation commands like inserts, updates, you have closed all previous active SQL readers.

Most common error is functions that read data from db and return values. For e.g functions like isRecordExist.

In this case we immediately return from the function if we found the record and forget to close the reader.

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2  
What does "close a reader" mean in Entity Framework? There is no visible reader in a query like var result = from customer in myDb.Customers where customer.Id == customerId select customer; return result.FirstOrDefault(); –  Anthony Sep 5 '11 at 16:17
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I was getting this same issue but in a different situation. I had a list of items in a list box. The user can click an item and select delete but I am using a stored proc to delete the item because there is a lot of logic involved in deleting the item. When I call the stored proc the delete works fine but any future call to SaveChanges will cause the error. My solution was to call the stored proc outside of EF and this worked fine. For some reason when I call the stored proc using the EF way of doing things it leaves something open.

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Had similar issue recently: the reason in my case was SELECT statement in stored procedure that produced empty result set and if that result set was not read, SaveChanges threw that exception. –  n0rd Mar 3 at 17:43
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FYI: from a book and some lines adjusted because its stil valid:

Invoking SaveChanges() method begins a transaction which automatically rolls back all changes persisted to the database if an exception occurs before iteration completes; otherwise the transaction commits. You might be tempted to apply the method after each entity update or deletion rather than after iteration completes, especially when you're updating or deleting massive numbers of entities.

If you try to invoke SaveChanges() before all data has been processed, you incur a "New transaction is not allowed because there are other threads running in the session" exception. The exception occurs because SQL Server doesn't permit starting a new transaction on a connection that has a SqlDataReader open, even with Multiple Active Record Sets (MARS) enabled by the connection string (EF's default connection string enables MARS)

Sometimes its better to understand why things are happening ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
A good way to avoid this is when you have a reader open to open a second one and put those operations in the second reader. This is something that you can need when you are updating master/details in the entity framework. You open the first connection for the master record and the second for the detail records. if you are only reading there should be no problems. the problems occur during updating. –  Herman Van Der Blom Apr 6 at 18:27
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The code below works for me:

private pricecheckEntities _context = new pricecheckEntities();

...

private void resetpcheckedtoFalse()
{
    try
    {
        foreach (var product in _context.products)
        {
            product.pchecked = false;
            _context.products.Attach(product);
            _context.Entry(product).State = EntityState.Modified;
        }
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }
    catch (Exception extofException)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(extofException.ToString());

    }
    productsDataGrid.Items.Refresh();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to SO! Consider adding an explanation and/or links describing why this works for you. Code-only answers are typically considered not good quality for SO. –  codeMagic Mar 25 at 19:57
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