Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

From this article Interoperable HTML5 Quirks Mode in IE10, the HTML5-based quirks mode is the default quirks mode in IE10 for those pages without a DOCTYPE or X-UA-Compatible tag. IE's legacy quirks mode is now referred to as Internet Explorer 5 quirks.

In the official IE10, it is. But not in the WebBrowser control. The default quirks mode is IE5 quirks in the WebBrowser control application.

For example: for a simplest html page that without DOCTYPE or X-UA-Compatible tag:

<html>
<head>
<meta charset="UTF-8" />
<title>Get documentMode!</title>
</head>
<body>
<h2>document.documentMode</h2>
<p>
<script>
document.write(document.documentMode);
</script>
<p>
</body>
</html>

The documentMode = 10 in Official IE10, but the documentMode = 5 in WebBrowser control application ( before test, I have added the registry item value: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main\FeatureControl\FEATURE_BROWSER_EMULATION\MyApp.exe to 10000, or 10001 in decimal).

Why the behavior is different?

How can I configure the default quirks mode of WebBrowser control application to "HTML5-based quirks mode" ?

Thanks for your reply in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Why aren't you declaring a Doctype? –  Rowland Shaw Jan 15 '14 at 10:36
    
I cannot modify the site pages. –  leo.zhang Jan 16 '14 at 1:55
    
From the article Interoperable HTML5 Quirks Mode in IE10, IE5 quirks mode only used for those pages without a DOCTYPE, and with the opt-in via X-UA-Compatible. <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=5"> I think the document mode of my simplest html page in WBC application should be HTML5-based quirks, because it has no DOCTYPE, and has no X-UA-Compatible tag (IE=5) also. But its value is IE5 quirks. Can I have some method to let my WebBBrowser Control application has the same quirks mode without modifying the web pages? –  leo.zhang Jan 16 '14 at 3:06
    
Possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/q/646742/50447 –  Rowland Shaw Jan 16 '14 at 8:39
    
Hi, Rowland. I think it isn't a duplicated question. I have added my application registry key into "FEATURE_BROWSER_EMULATION". My question is concerned on "why official IE10 is HTML5 Quirks Mode in default, but my application is IE5 Quirks Mode in default". I have no right to modify the web pages (add DOCTYPE or X-UA-Compatible meta tag etc.). –  leo.zhang Jan 17 '14 at 3:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to IE10 web browser control to show page without doctype, you need to set both of the following registry keys to make it work.

Key: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main\FeatureControl\FEATURE_BROWSER_EMULATION
Value: yourappname.exe
Type: (DWORD_32Bit value)
Data: 0x2711

Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\MAIN\FeatureControl\FEATURE_USE_QME_FOR_TOPLEVEL_DOCS
Value: yourappname.exe
Type: REG_DWORD (DWORD_32Bit value)
Data: 1

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, adding the hidden registry key “FEATURE_USE_QME_FOR_TOPLEVEL_DOCS” works. Thank you for your reply. But there is side effect. The application crashes often after adding this key. Any suggestions? –  leo.zhang Mar 25 '14 at 7:00

To force documents to display in IE10 standards mode in a web browser control (irrespective of DOCTYPE), the DWORD value of the registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Main\FeatureControl\FEATURE_BROWSER_EMULATION\MyApp.exe (where MyApp.exe is the name of your application's exe file) should be 0x2711.

If that is not working for you, I would suggest using a tool like regmon to confirm that it is reading your application's registry key.

share|improve this answer
    
I have test the application with value 0x2711. It doesn't work. According to your suggestion, I confirmed with the tool Procmon that the registry value was read. –  leo.zhang Jan 17 '14 at 2:41
    
Is the registry key you've added read? –  Rowland Shaw Jan 17 '14 at 8:45
    
Yes, the registry key was read。 Is there some other settings to control the behavior? –  leo.zhang Jan 20 '14 at 3:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.