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I am a total python beginner and I have a variable created in a class of a file commandline_reader.py that I want to access from another script. I tried to do it by making the variable global, which doesn't work.

myscript.py:

    from commandline_reader import Commandline_Reader
    reader = Commandline_Reader('--get_serial_number')
    reader.run()

    print output

commandline_reader.py:

    class Commandline_Reader:
        def __init__(self,argString=''):
            global output
            output = []

        def run(self):
            # do stuff
            a = 'somevariable'
            output.append(a) 

When I run myscript.py I always get a NameError: name 'output' is not defined. I've read that this is because global variables are only defined within a module. How do I correctly access the output variable in my script?

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4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Just return the Value from the run() Method

myscript.py:

from commandline_reader import Commandline_Reader
reader = Commandline_Reader('--get_serial_number')
output = reader.run()

print output

commandline_reader.py:

class Commandline_Reader:
    def __init__(self,argString=''):
        self.output = []

    def run(self):
        # do stuff
        a = 'somevariable'
        self.output.append(a)
        return self.output 
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2  
You mean self.output, the way it's now, output = [] in init does nothing. Also list.append returns None, so you shouldn't return it. –  RemcoGerlich Jan 15 '14 at 10:41
1  
the scope of output in your code does not know about the init function without an instance attribute self. This will still return a name error. –  jwillis0720 Jan 15 '14 at 10:43
    
Thanks for pointing me out. That were some silly errors... –  Mailerdaimon Jan 15 '14 at 10:45
    
Thanks, I was hoping there was such a trivial solution!! –  user3197620 Jan 15 '14 at 10:54

ouch. The whole reason object oriented programming takes place is to avoid the use of global variables. Make them instance variables to access them anywhere in the class.

class Commandline_Reader:
    def __init__(self,argString=''):
        self.output = []

    def run(self):
        # do stuff
        a = 'somevariable'
        self.output.append(a) #output is now part of the instance Commandline reader and can be accessed anywhere inside the class. 


 clr = Commandline_Reader(argstring='--get_serial_number')
 clr.run()
 print clr.output
 >>>['somevariable']
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Well there are lots of reasons. But I can't think of a reason why you would ever need global variables in a class. –  jwillis0720 Jan 15 '14 at 10:41

Make output an instance attribute:

class Commandline_Reader:
    def __init__(self,argString=''):
        self.output = [] # note use of self here
    def run(self):
        # do stuff
        a = 'somevariable'
        self.output.append(a) # and here

The access it via the instance:

print reader.output
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Maybe class attribute is more appropriate for you?

class Commandline_Reader:

    output = []

    def run(self):
        # do stuff
        a = 'somevariable'
        self.output.append(a) 
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