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My question is sort of like this question but I have more constraints:

  • I know the document's are reasonably sane
  • they are very regular (they all came from the same source
  • I want about 99% of the visible text
  • about 99% of what is viable at all is text (they are more or less RTF converted to HTML)
  • I don't care about formatting or even paragraph breaks.

Are there any tools set up to do this or am I better off just breaking out RegexBuddy and C#?

I'm open to command line or batch processing tools as well as C/C#/D libraries.

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3  
Anything but regexes. –  jonnii Jan 21 '10 at 23:09
    
If it was anything but so constraints, I'd never even think of regex :) –  BCS Jan 21 '10 at 23:13

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to use the HTML Agility Pack.

You probably want to find an element using LINQ ant the Descendants call, then get its InnerText.

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You mean I need to learn LINQ? (surprisingly, this really is the first thing I've run into were LINQ sounds like the right way to go, but then again, I'm not usually in this domain) –  BCS Jan 21 '10 at 23:15
    
@BCS: You don't need to learn LINQ, but LINQ makes it much easier to use. I would guess that using LINQ effectively would make your code at least 120% shorter, and easier to understand, too. –  SLaks Jan 21 '10 at 23:31
2  
Wow my code is -20 lines of code! ;) –  BCS Jan 21 '10 at 23:59
1  
+1 The agility pack is so much better than writing your own DOM processing program. –  Ioxp Jan 22 '10 at 16:06
    
As it happens, LINQ wasn't the easiest solution, but only because there is an example project html2text that did 90% of what I wanted and the last 1% was trivial to add as a few lines of if(...) return; (OTOH the documentation wasn't so good.) –  BCS Jan 25 '10 at 5:21

Here is the Best way:

  public static string StripHTML(string HTMLText)
    {
        Regex reg = new Regex("<[^>]+>", RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
        return reg.Replace(HTMLText, "");
    }
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1  
select link from google where query = "Html RegEx" limit 1 -> stackoverflow.com/questions/1732348 –  BCS Nov 19 '12 at 18:51

This code I hacked up today with HTML Agility Pack, will extract unformatted trimmed text.

public static string ExtractText(string html)
{
    if (html == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("html");
    }

    HtmlDocument doc = new HtmlDocument();
    doc.LoadHtml(html);

    var chunks = new List<string>(); 

    foreach (var item in doc.DocumentNode.DescendantNodesAndSelf())
    {
        if (item.NodeType == HtmlNodeType.Text)
        {
            if (item.InnerText.Trim() != "")
            {
                chunks.Add(item.InnerText.Trim());
            }
        }
    }
    return String.Join(" ", chunks);
}

If you want to maintain some level of formatting you can build on the sample provided with the source.

public string Convert(string path)
{
    HtmlDocument doc = new HtmlDocument();
    doc.Load(path);

    StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
    ConvertTo(doc.DocumentNode, sw);
    sw.Flush();
    return sw.ToString();
}

public string ConvertHtml(string html)
{
    HtmlDocument doc = new HtmlDocument();
    doc.LoadHtml(html);

    StringWriter sw = new StringWriter();
    ConvertTo(doc.DocumentNode, sw);
    sw.Flush();
    return sw.ToString();
}

public void ConvertTo(HtmlNode node, TextWriter outText)
{
    string html;
    switch (node.NodeType)
    {
        case HtmlNodeType.Comment:
            // don't output comments
            break;

        case HtmlNodeType.Document:
            ConvertContentTo(node, outText);
            break;

        case HtmlNodeType.Text:
            // script and style must not be output
            string parentName = node.ParentNode.Name;
            if ((parentName == "script") || (parentName == "style"))
                break;

            // get text
            html = ((HtmlTextNode) node).Text;

            // is it in fact a special closing node output as text?
            if (HtmlNode.IsOverlappedClosingElement(html))
                break;

            // check the text is meaningful and not a bunch of whitespaces
            if (html.Trim().Length > 0)
            {
                outText.Write(HtmlEntity.DeEntitize(html));
            }
            break;

        case HtmlNodeType.Element:
            switch (node.Name)
            {
                case "p":
                    // treat paragraphs as crlf
                    outText.Write("\r\n");
                    break;
            }

            if (node.HasChildNodes)
            {
                ConvertContentTo(node, outText);
            }
            break;
    }
}


private void ConvertContentTo(HtmlNode node, TextWriter outText)
{
    foreach (HtmlNode subnode in node.ChildNodes)
    {
        ConvertTo(subnode, outText);
    }
}
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From the command line, you can use the Lynx text browser like this:

If you want to download a web page in formatted output (i.e., without HTML tags, but instead as it would appear in Lynx), then enter:

lynx -dump URL > filename

If there are any links on the page, the URLs for those links will be included at the end of the downloaded page.

You can disable the list of links with -nolist. For example:

lynx -dump -nolist http://stackoverflow.com/a/10469619/724176 > filename
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Here you can download a tool and its source that converts to and fro HTML and XAML: XAML/HTML converter.

It contains a HTML parser (such a thing must obviously be much more tolerant than your standard XML parser) and you can traverse the HTML much similar to XML.

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It's relatively simple if you load the HTML into C# and then using the mshtml.dll or the WebBrowser control in C#/WinForms, you can then treat the entire HTML document as a tree, traverse the tree capturing the InnerText objects.

Or, you could also use document.all, which takes the tree, flattens it, and then you can iterate across the tree, again capturing the InnerText.

Here's an example:

        WebBrowser webBrowser = new WebBrowser();
        webBrowser.Url = new Uri("url_of_file"); //can be remote or local
        webBrowser.DocumentCompleted += delegate
        {
            HtmlElementCollection collection = webBrowser.Document.All;
            List<string> contents = new List<string>();

            /*
             * Adds all inner-text of a tag, including inner-text of sub-tags
             * ie. <html><body><a>test</a><b>test 2</b></body></html> would do:
             * "test test 2" when collection[i] == <html>
             * "test test 2" when collection[i] == <body>
             * "test" when collection[i] == <a>
             * "test 2" when collection[i] == <b>
             */
            for (int i = 0; i < collection.Count; i++)
            {
                if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(collection[i].InnerText))
                {
                    contents.Add(collection[i].InnerText);
                }
            }

            /*
             * <html><body><a>test</a><b>test 2</b></body></html>
             * outputs: test test 2|test test 2|test|test 2
             */
            string contentString = string.Join("|", contents.ToArray());
            MessageBox.Show(contentString);
        };

Hope that helps!

share|improve this answer
    
Googleing for mshtml.dll give most of a page or bug reports, bug fix and errors. --- Do you have a link to some documentation? –  BCS Jan 21 '10 at 23:21
    
I just edited my post with an example using the WebBrowser control. –  AlishahNovin Jan 22 '10 at 15:57
    
good example,works fine for me..+1 –  ridoy Jun 9 '13 at 12:00
    
Unfortunately this approach won't work on Server Core systems, as they don't have WebBrowser component installed. –  Dmitry Erokhin Jul 15 at 10:43

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