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What's the difference between defining methods on a prototype individually vs via an object?

Example:

function Example() {
  this.Test();
}

Example.prototype.Test = function() {
  alert("Example");
};

instead of:

function Example() {
  this.Test();
}

Example.prototype = {
  Test: function() {
    alert("Example");
  }
};
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marked as duplicate by Denys Séguret, rlemon, Aadit M Shah, Sirko, Vache Mar 5 '14 at 19:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
In the first you're adding a method to the prototype. In the second one you're replacing the prototype. –  Andy Jan 15 '14 at 12:02
    
A similar question : stackoverflow.com/questions/4848221/… –  Denys Séguret Jan 15 '14 at 12:03
    
Does it affect how the prototype works though? –  monkee52 Jan 15 '14 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's the difference between adding to the prototype and replacing it.

The only place it's really likely to make a difference is in this sort of scenario, which is relatively rare (and yet, I avoid replacing prototypes because of it):

var f = new Foo();

function Foo() {
}
Foo.prototype = {
    test: function() { }
};

f.test(); // Fails!

Live Copy | Live Source

That fails because the f object is created with Foo's original prototype object, but then later you replace that prototype object with a new one. f still uses the old one, which doesn't have the test property on it.

This works:

var f = new Foo();

function Foo() {
}
Foo.prototype.test = test: function() { };

f.test(); // Works

...because you're just adding to the object that f already uses as its prototype. Live Copy | Live Source

Provided f isn't created until after you've replaced Foo.prototype with a new object, it really doesn't make any significant difference.

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