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I have an array of numbers from 1 to 100 (both inclusive). The size of the array is 100. The numbers are randomly added to the array, but there is one random empty slot in the array. What is the quickest way to find that slot as well as the number that should be put in the slot? A Java solution is preferable.

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7  
There's no way this isn't homework. At the least, it's a little brainteaser whose purpose is to make you think and learn, so I never understand why we think it helps people for us to just hand them the complete answers on silver platter. –  Kevin Bourrillion Jan 22 '10 at 0:34
3  
Actually I was knowing one solution - find the sum of numbers from 1 - 100 and then subtract it from the sum of numbers in array to get the missing number.I am interested to see if there can be any other interesting solutions. –  Thunderhashy Jan 22 '10 at 0:44
2  
What is the value of 'empty'? 0? -1? –  MAK Jan 25 '10 at 21:02
    
Empty slot contains null. –  Thunderhashy Jan 25 '10 at 22:15
2  
I was asked this on an interview –  Foo Bah Jul 20 '11 at 18:39

17 Answers 17

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You can do this in O(n). Iterate through the array and compute the sum of all numbers. Now, sum of natural numbers from 1 to N, can be expressed as Nx(N+1)/2. In your case N=100.

Subtract the sum of the array from Nx(N+1)/2, where N=100.

That is the missing number. The empty slot can be detected during the iteration in which the sum is computed.

// will be the sum of the numbers in the array.
int sum = 0;
int idx = -1;
for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
    if (arr[i] == 0) {
         idx = i; 
    } else {
         sum += arr[i];
    }
}

// the total sum of numbers between 1 and arr.length.
int total = (arr.length + 1) * arr.length / 2;

System.out.println("missing number is: " + (total - sum) + " at index " + idx);
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You could make a note of any index being zero while iteration through the first time. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jan 21 '10 at 23:39
    
oh yes, that is correct. Daft of me. Updated response :) –  Andriyev Jan 21 '10 at 23:44
11  
Summation is prime to integer overflow, the following approach should take care of that: XOR all the given numbers, call this X1 XOR all numbers from 1 to 100, call this X2 X1 XOR X2 should be the missing number, since all the repeated numbers XOR away. –  Abhinav Sharma Aug 5 '11 at 9:23
6  
@AbhinavSharma True, but it also works with summation if overflow occurs, provided that overflow wraps nicely, which is guaranteed in Java, and in C for unsigned types. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 16 '11 at 11:47
1  
@DanielFischer Very cool response! I like your thinking. ;) –  brimborium Nov 14 '12 at 11:13
long n = 100;
int a[] = new int[n];

//XOR of all numbers from 1 to n
// n%4 == 0 ---> n
// n%4 == 1 ---> 1
// n%4 == 2 ---> n + 1
// n%4 == 3 ---> 0

long xor = (n % 4 == 0) ? n : (n % 4 == 1) ? 1 : (n % 4 == 2) ? n + 1 : 0;

for (long i = 1; i <= n; i++)
{
    xor = xor ^ a[i];
}
//Missing number
System.out.println(xor);
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3  
This answer looks interesting, but it needs a bit more explanation. –  gsingh2011 Jan 27 '13 at 6:36
2  
Xor of number with itself is zero. So if we take xor of all numbers in array with all number from 1 to n, we will be left with only the missing number –  adi Jul 6 '13 at 7:56
1  
Please, can someone explain why the initial value needs to involve a modulo by 4? –  jschank Apr 23 at 1:55

This was an Amazon interview question and was originally answered here: We have numbers from 1 to 52 that are put into a 51 number array, what's the best way to find out which number is missing?

It was answered, as below:

1) Calculate the sum of all numbers stored in the array of size 51. 
2) Subtract the sum from (52 * 53)/2 ---- Formula : n * (n + 1) / 2.

It was also blogged here: Software Job - Interview Question

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I tried this with 1,2,3 and 5 as the sequence. (i.e. 4 is the missing number). The sum of the values is 11 so i did ((11*12)/2)-11 and i get 55. Why am i not getting 4? –  ziggy Aug 5 '12 at 20:32
    
n is the number of numbers. So, it should be 5*(5+1)/2 = 15...and 15 - (1+2+3+5) = 4. –  bchetty Aug 6 '12 at 8:46
    
ah ok.. got it. Thanks :) –  ziggy Aug 6 '12 at 11:51

We can use XOR operation which is safer than summation because in programming languages if the given input is large it may overflow and may give wrong answer.

Before going to the solution A xor A = 0 so if we xor two identical number the value is Zero.

// Assuming that the array contains 99 distinct integers between 1..99 and empty slot    value is zero
for(int i=0;i<100;i++)
{
 if(ARRAY[i] != 0)
     XOR ^= ARRAY[i];
 XOR ^= (i + 1);
}
return XOR;

Xoring [1..n] with the elements present in the array cancels the identical numbers at the end we will get the missing number.

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5050 - (sum of all values in the array) = missing number

int sum = 0;
int idx = -1;
for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
  if (arr[i] == 0) idx = i; else sum += arr[i];
}
System.out.println("missing number is: " + (5050 - sum) + " at index " + idx);
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1  
what is 5050? this code doesn't seem to work given an array containing 1,2,0,4,5. –  core_pro Sep 19 '12 at 17:19
2  
@core_pro The size of your example array is 5, not 100 as the OP specified. 5050 is the sum of all integers from 1 to 100 and works for arrays with 100 elements. So the equivalent would be 15 for an array of size 5. –  CodesInChaos Feb 5 '13 at 17:08

Well, use a bloom filter.

int findmissing(int arr[], int n)
{
    long bloom=0;
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<;n; i++)bloom+=1>>arr[i];
    for(i=1; i<=n, (bloom<<i & 1); i++);
    return i;
}
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This is c# but it should be pretty close to what you need:

int sumNumbers = 0;
int emptySlotIndex = -1;

for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++)
{
  if (arr[i] == 0)
    emptySlotIndex = i;
  sumNumbers += arr[i];
}

int missingNumber = 5050 - sumNumbers;
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The solution that doesn't involve repetitive additions or maybe the n(n+1)/2 formula doesn't get to you at an interview time for instance.

You have to use an array of 4 ints (32 bits) or 2 ints (64 bits). Initialize the last int with (-1 & ~(1 << 31)) >> 3. (the bits that are above 100 are set to 1) Or you may set the bits above 100 using a for loop.

  1. Go through the array of numbers and set 1 for the bit position corresponding to the number (e.g. 71 would be set on the 3rd int on the 7th bit from left to right)
  2. Go through the array of 4 ints (32 bit version) or 2 ints(64 bit version)

    public int MissingNumber(int a[])
    {   
        int bits = sizeof(int) * 8;
        int i = 0;
        int no = 0;
        while(a[i] == -1)//this means a[i]'s bits are all set to 1, the numbers is not inside this 32 numbers section
        {
            no += bits;
            i++;
        }
        return no + bits - Math.Log(~a[i], 2);//apply NOT (~) operator to a[i] to invert all bits, and get a number with only one bit set (2 at the power of something)
    }

Example: (32 bit version) lets say that the missing number is 58. That means that the 26th bit (left to right) of the second integer is set to 0.

The first int is -1 (all bits are set) so, we go ahead for the second one and add to "no" the number 32. The second int is different from -1 (a bit is not set) so, by applying the NOT (~) operator to the number we get 64. The possible numbers are 2 at the power x and we may compute x by using log on base 2; in this case we get log2(64) = 6 => 32 + 32 - 6 = 58.

Hope this helps.

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I think the easiest and possibly the most efficient solution would be to loop over all entries and use a bitset to remember which numbers are set, and then test for 0 bit. The entry with the 0 bit is the missing number.

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    //Array is shorted and if writing in C/C++ think of XOR implementations in java as follows.
                    int num=-1;
    for (int i=1; i<=100; i++){
        num =2*i;
        if(arr[num]==0){
         System.out.println("index: "+i+" Array position: "+ num);      
         break;
        }
        else if(arr[num-1]==0){
         System.out.println("index: "+i+ " Array position: "+ (num-1)); 
         break;             
        }           
    }// use Rabbit and tortoise race, move the dangling index faster, 
     //learnt from Alogithimica, Ameerpet, hyderbad**
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If the array is randomly filled, then at the best you can do a linear search in O(n) complexity. However, we could have improved the complexity to O(log n) by divide and conquer approach similar to quick sort as pointed by giri given that the numbers were in ascending/descending order.

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That doesn't answer how to find out which number is missing. –  Sentry May 9 '13 at 8:42

This Program finds missing numbers

<?php
$arr_num=array("1","2","3","5","6");
$n=count($arr_num);
for($i=1;$i<=$n;$i++)
{       
      if(!in_array($i,$arr_num))
      {
      array_push($arr_num,$i);print_r($arr_num);exit;
      }

}
?>
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This answer should have been filed under PHP. The question is filed under JAVA. Yet it can stay here since a true algorithm is always syntax independent :) –  Ankur Kumar Mar 1 '13 at 19:33

One thing you could do is sort the numbers using quick sort for instance. Then use a for loop to iterate through the sorted array from 1 to 100. In each iteration, you compare the number in the array with your for loop increment, if you find that the index increment is not the same as the array value, you have found your missing number as well as the missing index.

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Now I'm now too sharp with the Big O notations but couldn't you also do something like (in Java)

for (int i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
    if(numbers[i] != i+1){
        System.out.println(i+1);
    }
}

where numbers is the array with your numbers from 1-100. From my reading of the question it did not say when to write out the missing number.

Alternatively if you COULD throw the value of i+1 into another array and print that out after the iteration.

Of course it might not abide by the time and space rules. As I said. I have to strongly brush up on Big O.

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The OP said that the numbers in the array can be unsorted –  Sentry May 9 '13 at 8:41

Here is a simple program to find the missing numbers in an integer array

ArrayList<Integer> arr=new ArrayList<Integer>();
        int a[]={1,3,4,5,6,7,10};
        int j=a[0];
        for(int i=0;i<a.length;i++)
        {
            if(j==a[i])
            {
                j++;
                continue;

            }else
            {
                arr.add(j);
                i--;
            j++;
            }
        }
        System.out.println("missing numbers are ");
        for(int r:arr)
        {
            System.out.println(" "+r);
        }
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Another homework question. A sequential search is the best that you can do. As for a Java solution, consider that an exercise for the reader. :P

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Quick sort is the best choice with maximum efficiency....

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actually if you use quicksort you get O(n log n). performing a real algorithm with your mind gives you O(n) –  tXK May 2 '12 at 13:01
1  
Nope it's not. There is an O(n) solution... –  brimborium Nov 14 '12 at 11:19

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