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I've written the following code in C:

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>

 #define LEN 100 

 int main(void) 
 {
    int arr[LEN];
    int i;

    for (i = 0; i < LEN; i++)
       printf("%d ", arr[LEN]);

    getchar();
    return 0;
 }

First, notice I'm deliberately accessing memory which isn't part of the array (the last cell will be in index LEN-1 and I'm accessing arr[LEN], not arr[i].

The weird result is that when I run the program, it prints all the numbers between 0 to... LEN-1. For exmaple, when LEN defined to be 100 like here, the output is:

0 1 2 ..... 99

Please run the program. Does it happens to you too? I think this is platform-dependant behavior. (If it is relevant, I ran this code on Windows 7.)

Why does the value of arr[LEN] change?

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13  
Undefined behaviour is undefined behaviour. In this particular case it looks like you have optimisation disabled and i happens to be located at the next address after the end of arr, but in general literally anything could happen (demons, noses, etc) and it wouldn't be a surprise. –  Paul R Jan 15 '14 at 14:28
    
First Initialize array, Second arr[LEN] is undefined behavior it should be arr[i] –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 15 '14 at 14:28
    
@PaulR oh, now I get it. Thanks, that's obviously the answer. –  Programmer Jan 15 '14 at 14:29
    
@GrijeshChauhan It shouldn't be arr[i], I deed it by purpse. Next time read what I'm writing before commenting. –  Programmer Jan 15 '14 at 14:30
1  
My guess is that you define i directly after your array. So &arr[LEN] (i.e. arr[100]) might, by chance, be the address of i. –  Arnaud Denoyelle Jan 15 '14 at 14:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To expand on the answers of others, consider the following:

Code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define LEN 100 

int main(void) 
{
    int i;
    int arr[LEN];

    printf("&arr[LEN]: %p\n", &arr[LEN]);
    printf("&i:        %p\n", &i);

    return 0;
}

Output

&arr[LEN]: 0x7fff5cf90a74  
&i:        0x7fff5cf90a74

On my machine, if i is declared before arr, i and arr[LEN] have the same address.

Run the following on your machine

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define LEN 100 

int main(void) 
{
    int arr[LEN];
    int i;

    printf("&arr[LEN]: %p\n", &arr[LEN]);
    printf("&i:        %p\n", &i);

    return 0;
}

You should see something very similar (addresses different, of course) to what I saw.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, thats obviously the answer. –  Programmer Jan 15 '14 at 14:43
    
Re: "You should see something very similar" -- note that you'll need to compile with all optimisations disabled to have any chance of seeing a similar result, and even then it's by no means guaranteed. –  Paul R Jan 16 '14 at 12:44
    
@PaulR He already has it configured is such a way as to see something similar, hence, the question. –  Fiddling Bits Jan 16 '14 at 14:25
    
@FiddlingBits: I was thinking more of future readers of this answer, who might get very different results. –  Paul R Jan 16 '14 at 14:44
    
@PaulR You're absolutely right. I should have kept that in mind. –  Fiddling Bits Jan 16 '14 at 17:11

The stack is where local variables are kept. Your compiler is using the memory location after the array (arr[LEN] basically) to keep i. Therefore you are accidentally printing out i on each iteration. A different compiler might keep i somewhere else and you wouldn't see the same thing.

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Thank you very much. –  Programmer Jan 15 '14 at 14:32

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