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C# 2 and VB.Net 8 introduced a new feature called iterators, which were designed to make it easier to return enumerables and enumerators.

However, iterators are actually a limited form of coroutines, and can be used to do many useful things that have nothing to do with collections of objects.

What non-standard uses of iterators have you seen in real code?

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Why limit it to C#? –  ChaosPandion Jan 22 '10 at 0:50
    
@Chaos: I didn't realize that they were also supported by VB. Edited. –  SLaks Jan 22 '10 at 1:01
1  
Actually, iterator blocks aren't a ".NET" (meaning: runtime) feature at all. They are language features, provided entirely by the compiler. –  Marc Gravell Jan 22 '10 at 6:30
    
@Marc: Yes, I know, but what should I have said? –  SLaks Jan 22 '10 at 13:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I used them to write a system in ASP.NET for creating a series of linked page interactions. If you imagine a user's conversation with a website as a series of requests and responses, you can model an interaction as an IEnumerable. Conceptually, like this;

IEnumerable<PageResponse> SignupProcess(FormValues form)
{
   // signup starts with a welcome page, asking
   // the user to accept the license.
   yield return new WelcomePageResponse();

   // if they don't accept the terms, direct 
   // them to a 'thanks anyway' screen
   if (!form["userAcceptsTerms"])
   {
      yield return new ThanksForYourTimePageResponse();
      yield break;
   }

   // On the second page, we gather their email;
   yield new EmailCapturePage("");
   while(!IsValid(form["address"]))
   {
     // loop until we get a valid address.
     yield return new EmailCapturePage("The email address is incorrect. Please fix.");
   } 
}

You can store the iterator in session state, so that when the user returns to the site you just pull the iterator out, move the iterator onto the next page, and yield it back for rendering. Complex site interactions are coded in a single place.

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Thanks. I suspect you could rip out the standard routing stuff from MVC, but I think you're right -- it'd be a lot of work. I also have no idea how I'd make it work with async AJAX calls... –  Steve Cooper Jan 22 '10 at 1:04
    
(I fixed your yield syntax) I really like that idea. It would be even better with ASP.Net MVC, but it might take some trickery to set up. –  SLaks Jan 22 '10 at 1:04
    
Where would you put that between page requests? On a stateless, clustered server? I'm not sure that is all so wonderful, sorry. –  Marc Gravell Jan 22 '10 at 5:21
1  
No, you couldn't run it on a server farm. I mention it as an example of wacky stuff with itserators, not necessarily as a fully-developed web framework :) –  Steve Cooper Jan 22 '10 at 7:45
4  
@Marc Gravell - You have to admit this is pretty cool even if it won't work on some hardware configurations. –  ChaosPandion Jan 22 '10 at 14:23

To start things off:

  • Jeffrey Richter wrote a powerful threading system called AsyncEnumerator using iterators. It's described in MSDN Magazine, parts one and two.
  • Iterators can also be used to wait for UI interaction within a method without blocking the UI thread, as I described here.
  • In a similar vein, I used iterators to create an IE-based web scraper, with scraping methods that return IEnumerators of WebActions which call back into the enumerator when ready. (Typically, when the document finishes loading).
    If people are interested, I can post it here.
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I used it to recursively iterate over the files contained in a folder, its subfolders and so on. For every file I had to perform a specific action. A recursive function with "yield return" statements was simple for everyone's else understanding.

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I wrote this function before I found out about the lazy yield operator. This recursively builds a massive iterator and returns it. It is not exactly efficient but I think it is clever.

static member generatePrimeNumbers max =    
    let rec generate number numberSequence =
        if number * number > max then numberSequence else
        let filteredNumbers = numberSequence |> Seq.filter (fun v -> v = number || v % number <> 0L)
        let newNumberSequence = seq { for i in filteredNumbers -> i }
        let newNumber = newNumberSequence |> Seq.find (fun x -> x > number)
        generate newNumber newNumberSequence                
    generate 2L (seq { for i in 2L..max -> i })
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What language is that? F#? –  SLaks Jan 22 '10 at 1:09
    
Yeah, the seq keyword is an alias for IEnumerable. –  ChaosPandion Jan 22 '10 at 1:10

Rhino.ETL makes heavy use of it to combine transformations over a sequence of input

for example 3 operations which can be combined, reused

public IEnumerable<Row> Execute(IEnumerable<Row> rows)
{
    foreach(var line in File.EnumerateLines())
    {
        var row = new Row();
        row["key"] = int.Parse(line.Substring(1));
        yield return row;
    }
}

public IEnumerable<Row> Execute(IEnumerable<Row> rows)
{
    foreach(var row in rows)
    {
        var value = (int)row["key"];
        row["key"] = value + 2;
        yield return row;
    }
}

public IEnumerable<Row> Execute(IEnumerable<Row> rows)
{
    using (var file = new Streamwriter(filename))
    {
        foreach(var row in rows)
        {
            file.WriteLine(row["key"]);
            yield return row;
        }
    }
}
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