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Using the git config --global command to set things up, where is the file?

eg :

git config --global core.editor "blah"

Its not at these places :-

C:\Program Files\Git\etc\gitconfig

C:\myapp.git\config

I have not env set?

git version 1.6.5.1.1367.gcd48 on Windows7

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1  
Are you using msysgit or something else? –  codeguru Jan 22 '10 at 0:40
104  
git config --global --edit should tell you the exact location no matter what kind of setup you have--just look at what file comes up in your editor. –  MatrixFrog Aug 11 '11 at 17:02
    
@MatrixFrog Great comment. Works great on Mac –  Codier Oct 25 '11 at 3:43
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git config --global --list was also useful for when it doesn't exist as it gave the location of where git is expecting it to be. –  AJP May 18 '13 at 11:22
    
For me, that command yields: e -w: e: command not found –  blaster May 30 '13 at 15:42
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7 Answers

up vote 140 down vote accepted

"Windows" and "C:\Program Files\Git" means MSysGit.

If you look at etc/profile (in C:\Program Files\Git):

HOME="$HOMEDRIVE$HOMEPATH"

Meaning:

C:\Users\MyLogin

(on Windows7)

Since:

--global

For writing options: write to global ~/.gitconfig file rather than the repository .git/config.

That means the file is in C:\Users\MyLogin\.gitconfig for msysgit in Windows7.

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I was being really dumb, I didnt add the "--global" flag to the edit command! "git config --global --edit" showed the file with all my config changes, "git config --edit" was the file I kept opening and thinking, where is that editor/compare/etc config item I just set! Many thanks. –  Ian Vaughan Jan 23 '10 at 11:36
    
Thanks. I've seen other places were it said it's at %USERPROFILE%. On my computer HOMEDRIVE and HOMEPATH are remapped to a network drive. Searches on my local drive were coming up with nothing. So this helped a lot. –  Mike M. Lin Aug 9 '11 at 18:11
    
Really useful, I was having the same issue - if you're on a domain with a mapped home drive it will try and create the git config there. This would make a good feature request - use %HOMEDRIVE% or %USERPROFILE% –  plasmid87 Apr 18 '12 at 14:32
    
Why is this called global, when it is only for one user? Wouldn't (for unix) /etc/gitconfig be "global" and ~/.gitconfig only be "local"..... and I guess .git/config "hyper-local" ----- Basically, I find the "global" term for this confusing, and I was wondering if there was a good reason for the nomenclature? –  Peter Ajtai Apr 27 '12 at 20:27
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@PeterAjtai "global" because it is for all your repository. As opposed to "local" (only for one repo) or "system" (which is for all repo, for all users) –  VonC Apr 27 '12 at 21:28
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On *nixes, it's in ~/.gitconfig. Is there a corresponding file in your home?

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This should be the same on windows. –  Felix Kling Jan 22 '10 at 0:56
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The paths for msysgit are:

Windows XP -C:\Documents and Settings\<user_name>\.gitconfig

Windows Vista+ C:\Users\<user_name>\.gitconfig

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+1 for giving the path in XP, but on Vista and 7 it's elsewhere. –  SamGoody Aug 16 '10 at 15:45
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Probably better to describe this as %USERPROFILE% then the answer will work for all Windows versions, past, present, and future. –  jarmod May 2 '13 at 18:41
    
@Dredd no it isn't - it's putting it on a network drive for me (and a lot of other people) –  orbfish Feb 13 at 21:26
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The global location is derived, on Windows MsysGit, using the HOMEDRIVE and HOMEPATH environment variables, unless you have defined a HOME environment variable. The is detailed in the 'profile' script.

In my corporate environment the HOMEDRIVE is H:, which is then mapped to a network URL \\share\$. The whole lot is then mapped to be "My Documents", which isn't where others would expect. There may have been some further problems with the drive to URL remapping. I don't even get to adjust the HOMEDRIVE or HOMEPATH variables anyway.

In my case I have defined a personal HOME environment variable and pointed it to D:\git\GitHOME and copied all those GIT files (which are without and extension) to the GitHOME directory for safe keeping.

The windows environment variables can be set via the Advanced tab in the My Computer properties dialog.

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I was also looking for the global .gitconfig on my Windows machine and found this neat trick using git.

Do a: git config --global -e and then, if you are lucky, you will get a text editor loaded with your global .gitconfig file. Simply lookup the folder from there (or try a save as...), et voilà! :-)

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If you are using TortoiseGit on a windows pc you can use:

Settings / Git / Config / Edit global .gitconfig

to open the global .gitignore file.

But if you use your windows (7) pc in a domain your profile dir is may be a network share (mounted as a drive). In this case TortoiseGit (at least:1.6.5.0) is pointing you to the wrong dir (on c:...). In this case wait for the bug http://code.google.com/p/tortoisegit/issues/detail?id=922 to be resolved or use %HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH% to open the dir that contains the .gitignore file.

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It might be useful to note (for *nix platforms): some types of global git configuration/information are stored in /usr/share/git-core/, such as git autocompletion scripts and the following (default) hooks:

  • applypatch-msg
  • post-update
  • pre-commit
  • prepare-commit-msg
  • commit-msg
  • pre-applypatch
  • pre-rebase
  • update

Each of these can contain their own set of commands to execute, at the time described by their respective filenames.

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Not useful for the OP question. –  orbfish Feb 13 at 22:12
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