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C++ lacks the equivalent of PHP's self keyword, which evaluates to the type of the enclosing class.

It's easy enough to fake it on a per-class basis:

struct Foo
{
   typedef Foo self;
};

but I had to write Foo again. Maybe I'll get this wrong one day and cause a silent bug.

Can I use some combination of decltype and friends to make this work "autonomously"? I tried the following already but this is not valid in that place:

struct Foo
{
   typedef decltype(*this) self;
};

// main.cpp:3:22: error: invalid use of 'this' at top level
//     typedef decltype(*this) self;

(I'm not going to worry about the equivalent of static, which does the same but with late binding.)

share|improve this question
3  
this_t would be probably more aligned with regular C++ naming. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 15 at 17:13
2  
@BartekBanachewicz: or this_type –  PlasmaHH Jan 15 at 17:14
8  
@Praetorian, I can't remember if it was a proposal or not, but someone suggested auto() and ~auto() for ctors/dtors. Interesting to say the least. If used for that purpose, perhaps typedef auto self;, but that seems a bit sketchy to me. –  chris Jan 15 at 17:27
6  
Honestly, if I was going to suggest syntax to make this possible, it would probably be decltype(class), maybe with a decltype(struct) equivalent. That's much clearer than just auto in a specific context and I don't see any problems with it fitting into the language based on decltype(auto). –  chris Jan 15 at 17:45
10  
Since you want to avoid errors, you may set up an dummy member function with static_assert, like void _check() { static_assert(std::is_same<self&, decltype(*this)>::value, "Correct your self type"); } Doesn't work with class templates, though... –  milleniumbug Jan 15 at 17:50

10 Answers 10

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Here's how you can do it without repeating the type of Foo:

template <typename...Ts>
class Self;

template <typename X, typename...Ts>
class Self<X,Ts...> : public Ts...
{
protected:
    typedef X self;
};

#define WITH_SELF(X) X : public Self<X>
#define WITH_SELF_DERIVED(X,...) X : public Self<X,__VA_ARGS__>

class WITH_SELF(Foo)
{
    void test()
    {
        self foo;
    }
};

If you want to derive from Foo then you should use the macro WITH_SELF_DERIVED in the following way:

class WITH_SELF_DERIVED(Bar,Foo)
{
    /* ... */
};

You can even do multiple inheritance with as many base classes as you want (thanks to variadic templates and variadic macros):

class WITH_SELF(Foo2)
{
    /* ... */
};

class WITH_SELF_DERIVED(Bar2,Foo,Foo2)
{
    /* ... */
};

I have verified this to work on gcc 4.8 and clang 3.4.

share|improve this answer
5  
I guess the answer is "no, but Ralph can!" ;) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 16 at 11:47
    
Ralph, this is superb! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 16 at 12:13
    
How is this in any way superior to simply putting the typedef in there? And god, why would you even need the typedef? Why? –  Miles Rout Jan 21 at 10:22
1  
@MilesRout This is a question about the question, not the answer. In many cases in software development (and especially maintenance) it is helpful to avoid redundancies in the code, so that changing something in one place does not require you to change code in another place. That's the whole point of auto and decltype or in this case of self. –  Ralph Tandetzky Jan 23 at 7:59

You can use a macro instead of a regular class declaration, that will do that for you.

#define CLASS_WITH_SELF(X) class X { typedef X self;

And then use like

CLASS_WITH_SELF(Foo) 
};

#define END_CLASS }; would probably help readability.


You could also take @Paranaix's Self and use it (it starts to get really hackish)

#define WITH_SELF(X) X : public Self<X>

class WITH_SELF(Foo) {
};
share|improve this answer
12  
EWWWW END_CLASS. That's totally unnecessary. –  Puppy Jan 15 at 17:18
27  
@DeadMG I think some people might like more consistency; after all, the first macro use doesn't end with {, so the } is "hanging", which text editors would probably dislike, too. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 15 at 17:19
5  
Nice idea but even though I’m not fundamentally opposed to macros I would only accept its usage here if it mimicked C++ scoping, i.e. if it were usable as CLASS_WITH_SELF(foo) { … }; – and I think that’s impossible to achieve. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 15 at 17:20
2  
@KonradRudolph I've added a way to do that, too. Not that I like it, just for the sake of completeness –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 15 at 17:23
1  
There are some problems with that approach, though. First one doesn't allow you to make the class inherit easily (unless you use another macro parameter(s)), and second has all the problems of inheriting from it that Self has. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 15 at 17:35

A possible workaround (as you still have to write the type once):

template<typename T>
struct Self
{
protected:
    typedef T self;
};

struct Foo : public Self<Foo>
{
    void test()
    {
        self obj;
    }
};

For a more safer version we could assure that T actually derives from Self<T>:

Self()
{
    static_assert(std::is_base_of<Self<T>, T>::value, "Wrong type passed to Self");
}

Notice that a static_assert inside a member function is probably the only way to check, as types passed tostd::is_base_of have to be complete.

share|improve this answer
4  
No need for typename in the typedef. And since this doesn’t reduce the number of redundancies I don’t think it’s a viable alternative. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 15 at 17:16
    
It has exactly the same problem of repeating Foo name. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 15 at 17:17
5  
It is marginally better than the original approach, though, since the repetition is very close together. Not a solution to the question, but +1 for a worthy attempt at a best-case workaround. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 15 at 17:18
2  
I used that solution a couple of times, and it has one BAD thing: when later deriving from Foo, you have to either: (1) propagate the T upwards to the leaf-descendant, or (2) remember to inherit from SelfT many times, or (3) accept that all children thing to be the Base.. usable, but unpretty. –  quetzalcoatl Jan 15 at 17:21
    
@quetzalcoatl: Since I'm trying to replicate self rather than static, that's no problem. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 15 at 17:24

I have no positive evidence but I think it’s impossible. The following fails – for the same reason as your attempt – and I think that’s the furthest we can get:

struct Foo {
    auto self_() -> decltype(*this) { return *this; }

    using self = decltype(self_());
};

Essentially, what this demonstrates is that the scope at which we want to declare our typedef simply has no access (be it direct or indirect) to this, and there’s no other (compiler independent) way of getting to the class’ type or name.

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2  
Will this be possibly with C++1y's return type deduction? –  dyp Jan 15 at 17:17
    
@dyp: Not in that form since self_() needs to be called on an object –  PlasmaHH Jan 15 at 17:17
3  
@dyp For the purpose of my answer that won’t change anything. The error here isn’t in the trailing return type, it’s in the invocation. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 15 at 17:18
1  
@quetzalcoatl: The innards of decltype is an unevaluated context, so invoking the member function isn't the problem (that won't be attempted) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 15 at 17:21
3  
FWIW, struct S { int i; typedef decltype(i) Int; }; works even though i is a non-static data member. It works because decltype has a special exception where a simple name is not evaluated as an expression. But I cannot think of any way of using this possibility in a way that answers the question. –  hvd Jan 15 at 17:49
#define SELF_CHECK( SELF ) void self_check() { static_assert( std::is_same< typename std::decay<decltype(*this)>::type, SELF >::value, "self wrong type" ); }
#define SELF(T) typedef T self; SELF_CHECK(T)

struct Foo {
  SELF(Foo); // works, self is defined as `Foo`
};
struct Bar {
  SELF(Foo); // fails
};

this does not work on template types, as self_check is not called, so the static_assert is not evaluated.

We can do some hacks to make it work for templates as well, but it has a minor run time cost.

#define TESTER_HELPER_TYPE \
template<typename T, std::size_t line> \
struct line_tester_t { \
  line_tester_t() { \
    static_assert( std::is_same< decltype(T::line_tester), line_tester_t<T,line> >::value, "test failed" ); \
    static_assert( std::is_same< decltype(&T::static_test_zzz), T*(*)() >::value, "test 2 failed" ); \
  } \
}

#define SELF_CHECK( SELF ) void self_check() { static_assert( std::is_same< typename std::decay<decltype(*this)>::type, SELF >::value, "self wrong type" ); }

#define SELF(T) typedef T self; SELF_CHECK(T); static T* static_test_zzz() { return nullptr; }; TESTER_HELPER_TYPE; line_tester_t<T,__LINE__> line_tester

an empty struct of size 1 byte is created in your class. If your type is instantiated, self is tested against.

share|improve this answer
    
That's not bad either! –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 15 at 19:15
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit now with template class support options. –  Yakk Jan 15 at 23:12
    
I was thinking exactly about this as I was leaving work yesterday. You beat me to it :). I'd suggest declaring self_check() as inline, to avoid linking issues (same symbol Foo::self_check() found in multiple object files). –  the swine Jan 16 at 10:57
    
@theswine: 9.3/2 says it's already inline. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 16 at 12:09
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit Oh, actually I was. Thank you, that will save me some typing in the future :). I'm always amazed by how much I don't know about C++. –  the swine Jan 16 at 13:10

I also think it's impossible, here's another failed but IMHO interesting attempt which avoids the this-access:

template<typename T>
struct class_t;

template<typename T, typename R>
struct class_t< R (T::*)() > { using type = T; };

struct Foo
{
   void self_f(); using self = typename class_t<decltype(&self_f)>::type;
};

#include <type_traits>

int main()
{
    static_assert( std::is_same< Foo::self, Foo >::value, "" );
}

which fails because C++ requires you to qualify self_f with the class when you want to take it's address :(

share|improve this answer
    
And the same problem happens with a regular int T::* pointer to member variable. And int self_var; typedef decltype(&self_var) self_ptr doesn't work either, that's just a regular int*. –  MSalters Jan 16 at 13:55

What works in both GCC and clang is to create a typedef that refers to this by using this in the trailing-return-type of a function typedef. Since this is not the declaration of a static member function, the use of this is tolerated. You can then use that typedef to define self.

#define DEFINE_SELF() \
    typedef auto _self_fn() -> decltype(*this); \
    using self = decltype(((_self_fn*)0)())

struct Foo {
    DEFINE_SELF();
};

struct Bar {
    DEFINE_SELF();
};

Unfortunately, a strict reading of the standard says that even this is not valid. What clang does is check that this is not used in the definition of a static member function. And here, it indeed isn't. GCC doesn't mind if this is used in a trailing-return-type regardless of the sort of function, it allows it even for static member functions. However, what the standard actually requires is that this is not used outside of the definition of a non-static member function (or non-static data member initialiser). Intel gets it right and rejects this.

Given that:

  • this is only allowed in non-static data member initialisers and non-static member functions ([expr.prim.general]p5),
  • non-static data members cannot have their type deduced from the initialiser ([dcl.spec.auto]p5),
  • non-static member functions can only be referred to by an unqualified name in the context of a function call ([expr.ref]p4)
  • non-static member functions can only be called by unqualified name, even in unevaluated contexts, when this can be used ([over.call.func]p3),
  • a reference to a non-static member function by qualified name or member access requires a reference to the type being defined

I think I can conclusively say that there is no way at all to implement self without including in some way, somewhere, the type name.

Edit: There is a flaw in my earlier reasoning. "non-static member functions can only be called by unqualified name, even in unevaluated contexts, when this can be used ([over.call.func]p3)," is incorrect. What it actually says is

If the keyword this (9.3.2) is in scope and refers to class T, or a derived class of T, then the implied object argument is (*this). If the keyword this is not in scope or refers to another class, then a contrived object of type T becomes the implied object argument. If the argument list is augmented by a contrived object and overload resolution selects one of the non-static member functions of T, the call is ill-formed.

Inside a static member function, this may not appear, but it still exists.

However, per the comments, inside a static member function, the transformation of f() to (*this).f() would not be performed, and it that isn't performed, then [expr.call]p1 is violated:

[...] For a member function call, the postfix expression shall be an implicit (9.3.1, 9.4) or explicit class member access (5.2.5) whose [...]

as there would be no member access. So even that wouldn't work.

share|improve this answer
    
I think [class.mfct.non-static]/3 says that _self_fn_1() is "transformed" into (*this)._self_fn_1(). Not sure if that makes it illegal, though. –  dyp Jan 18 at 13:12
    
@dyp It says "is used in a member of class X in a context where this can be used", so I don't think that transformation is performed. –  hvd Jan 18 at 13:17
1  
But then it is neither an implicit nor explicit class member access..? [expr.call]/1 "For a member function call, the postfix expression shall be an implicit or explicit class member access [...]" –  dyp Jan 18 at 13:19
    
(I mean, what happens when you have auto _self_fn_1() -> decltype(*this); auto _self_fn_1() const -> decltype(*this);?) –  dyp Jan 18 at 13:21
    
@dyp [expr.call]/1 is a good point, I'll have to take a closer look. About const overloads, though: that isn't a problem. 5.1p3 has specifically been modified to also apply to static member functions, and says the type of this is Foo*/Bar* (without const), because there is no const in the declaration of _self_fn_2. –  hvd Jan 18 at 13:25

Unless the type needs to be member type of the enclosing class you could replace the use of self with decltype(*this). If you use it in many places in your code you can define a macro SELF as follows:

#define SELF decltype(*this)
share|improve this answer
4  
Won't work within static member functions –  PlasmaHH Jan 15 at 17:25
1  
And you cannot use that outside of the class, or in nested classes –  Drax Jan 15 at 17:26
1  
@Drax: It isn't supposed to be available outside the class. –  Ben Voigt Jan 15 at 23:03
1  
I don't think so. Shouldn't self refer to the immediately enclosing class and not the outer class? But I don't know php that well. –  Ben Voigt Jan 16 at 12:17
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: I guess that code and error is supposed to say "PHP doesn't have nested types"? –  Ben Voigt Jan 16 at 12:45

I will repeat the obvious solution of "having to do it yourself":

#define DECLARE_SELF(Type) typedef Type _TySelf; /**< @brief type of this class */

struct XYZ {
    DECLARE_SELF(XYZ)
};

This has the obvious problem with copy-pasting the code to a different class and forgetting to change XYZ, like here:

struct ABC {
    DECLARE_SELF(XYZ) // !!
};

My first approach was not very original - making a function, like this:

/**
 *  @brief namespace for checking the _TySelf type consistency
 */
namespace __self {

/**
 *  @brief compile-time assertion (_TySelf must be declared the same as the type of class)
 *
 *  @tparam _TySelf is reported self type
 *  @tparam _TyDecltypeThis is type of <tt>*this</tt>
 */
template <class _TySelf, class _TyDecltypeThis>
class CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE;

/**
 *  @brief compile-time assertion (specialization for assertion passing)
 *  @tparam _TySelf is reported self type (same as type of <tt>*this</tt>)
 */
template <class _TySelf>
class CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE<_TySelf, _TySelf> {};

/**
 *  @brief static assertion helper type
 *  @tparam n_size is size of object being used as assertion message
 *      (if it's a incomplete type, compiler will display object name in error output)
 */
template <const size_t n_size>
class CStaticAssert {};

/**
 *  @brief helper function for self-check, this is used to derive type of this
 *      in absence of <tt>decltype()</tt> in older versions of C++
 *
 *  @tparam _TyA is reported self type
 *  @tparam _TyB is type of <tt>*this</tt>
 */
template <class _TyA, class _TyB>
inline void __self_check_helper(_TyB *UNUSED(p_this))
{
    typedef CStaticAssert<sizeof(CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE<_TyA, _TyB>)> _TyAssert;
    // make sure that the type reported as self and type of *this is the same
}

/**
 *  @def __SELF_CHECK
 *  @brief declares the body of __self_check() function
 */
#define __SELF_CHECK \
    /** checks the consistency of _TySelf type (calling it has no effect) */ \
    inline void __self_check() \
    { \
        __self::__self_check_helper<_TySelf>(this); \
    }

/**
 *  @def DECLARE_SELF
 *  @brief declares _TySelf type and adds code to make sure that it is indeed a correct one
 *  @param[in] Type is type of the enclosing class
 */
#define DECLARE_SELF(Type) \
    typedef Type _TySelf; /**< @brief type of this class */ \
    __SELF_CHECK

} // ~self

It is kind of lengthy, but please bear with me here. This has the advantage of working in C++03 without decltype, as the __self_check_helper function is employed to deduce type of this. Also, there is no static_assert, but the sizeof() trick is employed instead. You could make it much shorter for C++0x. Now this will not work for templates. Also, there is a minor issue with the macro not expecting semicolon at the end, if compiling with pedantic, it will complain about an extra unnecessary semicolon (or you will be left with an odd looking macro not ending in semicolon in the body of XYZ and ABC).

Making a check on the Type that is passed to DECLARE_SELF is not an option, as that would only check the XYZ class (which is ok), oblivious to ABC (which has error). And then it hit me. A no-additional storage zero-cost solution that works with templates:

namespace __self {

/**
 *  @brief compile-time assertion (_TySelf must be declared the same as the type of class)
 *  @tparam b_check is the asserted value
 */
template <bool b_check>
class CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE2;

/**
 *  @brief compile-time assertion (specialization for assertion passing)
 */
template <>
class CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE2<true> {};

/**
 *  @def DECLARE_SELF
 *  @brief declares _TySelf type and adds code to make sure that it is indeed a correct one
 *  @param[in] Type is type of the enclosing class
 */
#define DECLARE_SELF(Type) \
    typedef Type _TySelf; /**< @brief type of this class */ \
    __SELF_CHECK \
    enum { __static_self_check_token = __LINE__ }; \
    typedef __self::CStaticAssert<sizeof(CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE2<int(__static_self_check_token) == int(_TySelf::__static_self_check_token)>)> __static_self_check

} // ~__self 

This simply makes static assertion on a unique enum value (or at least unique in case you don't write all of your code on a single line), no type-comparing trickery is employed, and it works as static assert, even in templates. And as a bonus - the final semicolon is now required :).

I'd like to thank Yakk for giving me a good inspiration. I wouldn't write this without first seeing his answer.

Tested with VS 2008 and g++ 4.6.3. Indeed, with the XYZ and ABC example, it complains:

ipolok@ivs:~$ g++ self.cpp -c -o self.o
self.cpp:91:5: error: invalid application of âsizeofâ to incomplete type â__self::CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE2<false>â
self.cpp:91:5: error: template argument 1 is invalid
self.cpp: In function âvoid __self::__self_check_helper(_TyB*) [with _TyA = XYZ, _TyB = ABC]â:
self.cpp:91:5:   instantiated from here
self.cpp:58:87: error: invalid application of âsizeofâ to incomplete type â__self::CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE<XYZ, ABC>â

Now if we make ABC a template:

template <class X>
struct ABC {
    DECLARE_SELF(XYZ); // line 92
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    ABC<int> abc;
    return 0;
}

We will get:

ipolok@ivs:~$ g++ self.cpp -c -o self.o
self.cpp: In instantiation of âABC<int>â:
self.cpp:97:18:   instantiated from here
self.cpp:92:9: error: invalid application of âsizeofâ to incomplete type â__self::CSELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE2<false>â

Only the line-number check triggered, as the function check was not compiled (as expected).

EDIT:

With C++0x (and without the evil underscores), you would need just:

namespace self_util {

/**
 *  @brief compile-time assertion (tokens in class and TySelf must match)
 *  @tparam b_check is the asserted value
 */
template <bool b_check>
class SELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE;

/**
 *  @brief compile-time assertion (specialization for assertion passing)
 */
template <>
class SELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE<true> {};

/**
 *  @brief static assertion helper type
 *  @tparam n_size is size of object being used as assertion message
 *      (if it's a incomplete type, compiler will display object name in error output)
 */
template <const size_t n_size>
class CStaticAssert {};

#define SELF_CHECK \
    /** checks the consistency of TySelf type (calling it has no effect) */ \
    void self_check() \
    { \
        static_assert(std::is_same<TySelf, decltype(*this)>::value, "TySelf is not what it should be"); \
    }

#define DECLARE_SELF(Type) \
    typedef Type TySelf; /**< @brief type of this class */ \
    SELF_CHECK \
    enum { static_self_check_token = __LINE__ }; \
    typedef self_util::CStaticAssert<sizeof(SELF_TYPE_MUST_BE_THE_SAME_AS_CLASS_TYPE<int(static_self_check_token) == int(TySelf::static_self_check_token)>)> static_self_check

} // ~self_util

I believe that the CStaticAssert bit is regrettably still required as it produces a type, which is typedef-ed in the template body (i suppose the same cannot be done with static_assert). The advantage of this approach is still its zero cost.

share|improve this answer
    
You’re essentially re-implementing static_assert here, aren’t you? Furthermore, your complete code is invalid because you’re using illegal (reserved) identifiers. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 16 at 13:43
    
@KonradRudolph Yes, that is indeed the case. I don't have C++0x at the time, so I reimplemented static_assert in order to provide complete answer. I say that in the answer. Is it invalid? Can you point out how? It compiled fine, I'm using it right now. –  the swine Jan 16 at 14:27
    
The identifiers are invalid because C++ reserves everything with a leading underscore followed by uppercase letter, as well as two leading underscores in global scope, for the compiler. User code must not use it, but not all compilers will flag it as an error. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 16 at 15:48
    
@KonradRudolph I see, I did not know that. I have a lot of code that use that, never had problems with it on neither Linux / Mac / Windows. But I guess it is good to know. –  the swine Jan 16 at 15:57

Provide my version. The best thing is that its use is the same as the native class. However, it doesn't work for template classes.

template<class T> class Self;

#define CLASS(Name) \
class Name##_; \
typedef Self<Name##_> Name; \
template<> class Self<Name##_>

CLASS(A)
{
    int i;
    Self* clone() const { return new Self(*this); }
};

CLASS(B) : public A
{
    float f;
    Self* clone() const { return new Self(*this); }
};
share|improve this answer

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