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I have a following example (with overly safe boolean type):

#include <cstdlib>

struct boolean_type
{

    explicit
    boolean_type(bool _value)
        : value_(_value)
    { ; }

    explicit
    operator bool () const
    {
        return value_;
    }

private :

    bool value_;

};

struct A
{

    A(int const _i) 
        : i_(_i)
    { ; }

    boolean_type operator == (A const & _other) const
    {
        return (i_ == _other.i_);
    }

private :

    int i_;

};

bool t()
{
    return A(0) == A(0);
}

int main()
{ 
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

It is well-known that such code containing an errors: "could not convert '(((int)((const A*)this)->A::i_) == ((int)other.A::i))' from 'bool' to 'boolean_type'" in return statement of bool A::operator == (A const &) const and "cannot convert 'boolean_type' to 'bool'" in return statement of bool t(). But what the risk here? Why there are not explicit conversion here in both cases? Why are implicit? In fact we explicitly specify the returning type bool in second case and static_assert(std::is_same< bool, decltype(std::declval< int >() == std::declval< int >()) >::value, "!"); as such!

Additionally want to say:

Due to the specified obstruction I cannot simply replace all entries of the bool to my super-safe boolean_type (which is mocked-object) in my user code, because, say, in return statement of boost::variant::operator == uses above construction, that treats there as implicit conversion. Similar obstructions are not unique.

share|improve this question
    
There is no duplicate at all in Q, because there is a consideration of significand details implied in the discussion. – Orient Jan 15 '14 at 17:48
    
Where did this code come from? – Vaughn Cato Jan 15 '14 at 17:53
2  
There has been a lot of debate in the committee about this very question (should return imply an explicit conversion to the return type)... – Marc Glisse Jan 15 '14 at 17:55
1  
@Dukales those I remember were not public conversations. But you could search the wg21 issue lists and the isocpp.org mailing lists. – Marc Glisse Jan 15 '14 at 18:04
1  
@JohnDibling return is a very special case. You have spelled out the type to convert to a few lines above. This is not the same as converting to some random type that is never mentioned in the function. Then it becomes a matter of taste. I think having to repeat the type in every return statement is a pain. – Marc Glisse Jan 15 '14 at 18:09

You have two implicit conversions. One here:

return (i_ == _other.i_);

And another here:

return A(0) == A(0);

These are implicit because you are not explicitly telling the compiler that you want to convert the result of the comparisons to boolean_type and bool respectively. These implicit conversions are not allowed because you made both the constructor and conversion operator of boolean_type explicit - that's the whole point of the explicit keyword.

You would need to do:

return static_cast<boolean_type>(i_ == _other.i_);

And:

return static_cast<bool>(A(0) == A(0));

The typical reason for making conversions to bool explicit is because the conversion may be used in situations that you did not intend it to be used. For example, if you had boolean_type objects called b1 and b2 with non-explicit conversions, you would be able to do the following:

b1 > 0
b1 == b2

These are probably not the intended uses of the boolean conversion operator.

share|improve this answer
    
But what about the risk? – Orient Jan 15 '14 at 17:53
    
@Dukales The risk is that you never intended bools to be implicitly converted to boolean_type and vice versa. If that's not a risk, you shouldn't make them explicit. By making them explicit, it is you that has declared there is a risk. – Joseph Mansfield Jan 15 '14 at 17:55
    
I see evident risk here: boolean_type(false) + boolean_type(true);, but not in above examples. – Orient Jan 15 '14 at 17:58
1  
One can argue that specifying the return type of the function is already a very explicit way to say what type you want to return. – Marc Glisse Jan 15 '14 at 18:00
1  
@JohnDibling Let's agree to disagree. I asked for a conversion by specifying the return type of the function. The standard trying to nanny me and forcing me to use baby-speak by repeating things many times is just a pain. – Marc Glisse Jan 15 '14 at 18:13

Why there are not explicit conversion here in both cases?

Because the onus is on you, the programmer, to be explicit if you want an explicit conversion.

Implicit conversions would work in this case if you had allowed them. But you didn't allow them when you marked operator bool and boolean_type::boolean_type as explicit.

Why are implicit?

Because you did not write the conversion. You must:

  boolean_type operator == (A const & _other) const
  {   
      return boolean_type (i_ == _other.i_);
  }

...and:

bool t()
{   
    return (bool) (A(0) == A(0));
}

But what the risk here?

You tell us. explicit exists specifically to tell the compiler that there might be a risk in permitting some implicit conversions to take place. So when you marked those functions as explicit you said to the compiler:

Ok, if you allow an implicit conversion from a bool to a boolean_operator or vice versa, something bad might happen. So don't allow those implicit conversions.

You didn't tell the compiler (or us) why those implicit conversions are dangerous. You only said that they were.

share|improve this answer
    
What about stackoverflow.com/questions/21144568/… ? – Orient Jan 15 '14 at 18:00
    
@Dukales: Sure, ok. I can probably come up with some contrived examples where an implicit conversion is either exactly what you want or not what you want, but that's not the point. The point is you told the compiler to not permit these implicit conversions, and then tried to employ one. So the risk there, as far as the compiler is concerned, is if it had allowed those implicit conversions then it would be doing something you told it not to do. – John Dibling Jan 15 '14 at 18:03
    
In present state this explicit conversion constructors/conversion operators is little useless. See the addition in the Q. – Orient Jan 15 '14 at 18:13

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