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I'm creating a table that shows all the registered users to which the current user has not yet subscribed to. But once he has subscribed someone, I need to filter that list to exclude those.

Let's say the theres a table called subscribed which lists the User and to whom he is subscribed to.

|UserId||SubscriberID|

Its easy to make it into multiple queries, but I've been unsuccessfully trying to make it into one query, to save an extra loop of MySQL calls.

Here's What I have so far:

 SELECT u.UserID, FullName, UserName from users u 
    LEFT JOIN subscribed t ON 
     ((u.UserName LIKE '%$search%' OR 
       u.Email LIKE '%$search%') AND 
      ({$_SESSION['ID']} = t.UserID 
        AND t.FollowerID != u.UserID)
     )

I know the last part of the query is wrong, since I only compare if the UserID and the FollowerID don't match for one particular row, not the entire table.

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The last part needs to be in the Where clause of the query, so it will work within each row, rather than joining on the whole table... –  Rick Mogstad Jan 22 '10 at 2:55
    
Doesn't seem to change anything. Can you elaborate? –  Stanislav Palatnik Jan 22 '10 at 3:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To find a list of results in table A that are not in table B, you have two options. Either use the NOT IN syntax, or LEFT JOIN and look where the PK field in the B table is NULL.

NOT IN example:

SELECT a.id FROM a WHERE a.id NOT IN (SELECT b.id FROM b)

LEFT JOIN example:

SELECT a.id FROM a LEFT JOIN b ON (a.id = b.id) WHERE (b.id IS NULL)

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1  
I should mention that using NOT IN with a subquery is going to require MySQL 5.0 or greater, and will be slower than the LEFT JOIN idea. I personally prefer the semantics of the NOT IN syntax despite it's lack of performance as long as it doesn't significantly affect your application's response times. –  Bret Kuhns Jan 22 '10 at 3:10
1  
MySQL 4.1 supports subqueries too. –  Bill Karwin Jan 22 '10 at 3:23
    
Oh thanks Bill, that sounds familiar now that you mention it. –  Bret Kuhns Jan 22 '10 at 3:36

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