Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

First of all, I must state, that I don't have much of a C# background, so I may be missing obvious things here.

I am limited to .net 3.5 (so no async / await).

I've made a wrapper for NetworkStream, that would read "exactly N" bytes (as opposed to the traditional "up to N" bytes) and not block the current thread. What I want to do the same in the blocking way (that is, block until exactly N bytes have been received, return those bytes to the caller), but, obviously, without writing a completely separate implementation, that uses Read, for example.

internal class ReadBytesContext
{
    public Action<byte[]> Callback { get; private set; }

    public byte[] Buffer { get; private set; }

    public int ReadSoFar { get; set; }

    public ReadBytesContext(
        Action<byte[]> callback, 
        byte[] buffer, 
        int readSoFar)
    {
        Callback = callback;
        Buffer = buffer;
        ReadSoFar = readSoFar;
    }
}

// Network-related exception handling omitted for brevity.
public class Connection
{
    private NetworkStream _stream;

    public Connection(NetworkStream stream)
    {
        _stream = stream;
    }

    public void ReadBytes(int numBytes, Action<byte[]> callback)
    {
        var buffer = new byte[numBytes];
        _stream.BeginRead(
            buffer, 
            0, 
            numBytes, 
            new AsyncCallback(ReadBytesMaybeDone),
            new ReadBytesContext(callback, buffer, 0));
    }

    private void ReadBytesMaybeDone(IAsyncResult ar)
    {
        int bytesRead = _stream.EndRead(ar);
        var context = (ReadBytesContext)ar.AsyncState;
        context.ReadSoFar += bytesRead;
        if (context.ReadSoFar < context.Buffer.Length)
        {
            _stream.BeginRead(
                context.Buffer, 
                context.ReadSoFar,
                context.Buffer.Length - context.ReadSoFar,
                new AsyncCallback(ReadBytesMaybeDone), 
                context);
        }
        else
        {
            context.Callback(context.Buffer);
        }
    }
}

Is this generally a valid approach to networking stuff in c#?

possibly unrelated side-question: how do I set up a catch-all handler for callbacks, that are run on the ThreadPool (that's where the delegate, that is passed to Begin* is run, right), so that uncaught exceptions in them don't crash the app?

share|improve this question
3  
As for the catching of exceptions, the callbacks you invoke need to have try/catch handlers in them. So your ReadBytesMaybeDone method needs to have try/catch handlers. –  Tejs Jan 15 at 20:35
    
Are you planning in reusing ReadBytes, by passing a bool to specify how the operation should be done? Or are you using some other criteria to specify whether to go sync or async? –  rae1 Jan 15 at 20:48
    
Nitpicking: "ReadSoFar = ReadSoFar;" should be ReadSoFar = readSoFar; –  elgonzo Jan 15 at 20:59
    
@rae1n I would rather just create another method (that will possibly call ReadBytes itself). –  shylent Jan 15 at 21:00
    
@Tejs yes and no. I mean, I've omitted the obvious network-related exception catching, but I definitely do not want to add a try / catch (to catch all exceptions) to every callback. On the other hand I don't want some exception, that managed to slip by to crash the entire app. –  shylent Jan 15 at 21:03

2 Answers 2

No it isn't really a good approach because of the potential for an exception here if the network stream is closed prematurely by the client.

Have you looked at Jeff Richter's AsyncEnumerator? I've used it in the past with .net 3.5. Look for the Wintellect Powerthreading library in nugget. Basically the first block of code before the yield return executes sync but as soon a the yield is hit the thread is magically put back in the threadpool and execution doesn't resume until the async operation completes. It's old school async/await really.

private IEnumerator<int> ReadBytesEnumerator(AsyncEnumerator<byte[]> ae, int numbytes)
{
   byte [] buffer = new byte[numbytes];
   int totalBytes = 0;
   while(totalBytes < numbytes)
   {
     _stream.BeginRead(buffer , totalBytes , numbytes - totalBytes , ae.End(), null);

     yield return 1;

     totalBytes +=_stream.EndRead(ae.DequeueResult());

   }
   ae.Result = buffer;
}

public IAsyncResult BeginReadBytes(int numBytes, AsyncCallback callback, object state)
{
   AsyncEnumerator<byte []> ae = new AsyncEnumerator<byte[]>();
   return ae.BeginExecute(ReadBytesEnumerator(ae, numBytes), callback, state);
}

public byte [] EndReadBytes(IAsyncResult result)
{
  return AsyncEnumerator<byte[]>.FromAsyncResult(result).EndExecute();
}

Now it's up to the calling code to handled any exceptons whenever EndReadBytes is called. To make this method sync you can just call EndReadBytes(BeginReadBytes(numBytes, null, null); or even wrap that piece with your ReadBytes method.

share|improve this answer

If you are going to reuse the Connection class, and specifically the ReadBytes method, a possible implementation might be,

public void ReadBytes(
    int numBytes, 
    Action<byte[]> callback, 
    bool doAsync = true)
{
   if (doAsync)
       ReadBytesAsync(numBytes, callback);
   else
       ReadBytesSync(numBytes, callback);
}

private void ReadBytesSync(int numBytes, Action<byte[]> callback)
{
    var buffer = new byte[numBytes];
    var context = new ReadBytesContext(callback, buffer, 0);
    while (context.ReadSoFar < context.Buffer.Length)
    {
        var bytesRead = _stream.Read(
            context.Buffer, 
            context.ReadSoFar, 
            context.Buffer.Length - context.ReadSoFar);
        context.ReadSoFar += bytesRead;
    }

    context.Callback(context.Buffer);
}

private void ReadBytesAsync(int numBytes, Action<byte[]> callback)
{
    // Works as your current ReadBytes, which is async
}
share|improve this answer
    
Weeeell, yes, but I've mentioned the following: "What I want to do the same in the blocking way ... but, obviously, without writing a completely separate implementation, that uses Read", haven't I? –  shylent Jan 15 at 21:06
    
I would argue that with your Context class you've already reduce most of the duplication, to the point you only need to pass the context and do the while loop. In either case, though, are you looking for an implementation without using Read? –  rae1 Jan 15 at 21:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.