Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was hoping someone could help me with a question I've come up on.

I have a Session object that handles storage of general session data, I also have a Authentication object which validates a users credentials.

Initially I passed the desired Authentication class name to my Session object then had a login method that created an instance of the Authentication object and validate the credentials. I stored the result of this validation in a Session variable and made it available via a getter. The user data was also stored in the Session for later use. In addition to all this, I have a logout method, which removes the user data from the Session and thus logging the user out.

My question is what role should the Session object play in users logging into their account?

And what other ways might one suggest I go about handling user login, as it stands right now I feel as though I'm getting too much wrapped up in my Session object.

share|improve this question
    
I am having a similar issue and I am considering storing some stuff into APC Cache or Memcache so it is in memory instead of file based session or database sessions –  jasondavis Jan 22 '10 at 4:15
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simply calling your authenticate method should trigger logic within Auth to store the proper data in the session (or some other data store) and Auth should also be used exclusively to retreive/revoke this info. So using the example form your comment it might be:

class Auth {
  public static function authenticate($identity, $pass)
  {
     // do lookup to match identity/pass if its good then

     /* assume $auth is an array with the username/email or 
        whatever data you need to store as part of authentication */
     Session::set('auth', $auth);
     return true;

     // if auth failed then 
     Session::set('auth', array('user'=>'anonymous'));
     return false;
  }

  public function isAuthenticated()
  {
     $auth = Session::get('auth');
     if(!$auth)
     {
       return false;
     }

     return (isset($auth['user']) && $auth['user'] !== 'anonymous'); 
   }
}

[...] as it stands right now I feel as though I'm getting too much wrapped up in my Session object.

And id agree. Idelaly for authentication/credentials you shoudl only be interacting with the Auth/Acl object(s). They would then utilize the session as stateful store... but you shouldnt care that its even stored in session. The code utilizng the Auth/Acl object(s) should be completely unaware of this fact.

For example:

//Bad

if($session->get('authenticated', 'auth'))
{
  // do stuff
}


// also bad

if(isset($_SESSION['authenticated']))
{
  // do stuff
}


//Good

if($auth->isAuthenticated())
{
  // do stuff
}

// inside $auth class it might look like this
public function isAuthenticated()
{
  $store = $this->getSotrage(); // assume this returns the $_SESSION['auth']
  return isset($store['authenticated']);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just so I'm understanding you correctly, your suggesting I do authentication directly, then getting result and storing it in my Session? Something along the lines of: if ($result = Auth::authenticate($email, $psswd)) { Session::set('user', $result); } –  Andre Jan 22 '10 at 4:24
1  
no all inter action with the session should be in the auth class.. you shoudl never outside of the auth class be accessing the auth values in the session. –  prodigitalson Jan 22 '10 at 4:27
    
Just some clarification when you say auth values, I take it to mean the credentials used for authentication those being username and more specifically the password. –  Andre Jan 22 '10 at 5:06
    
Well you shouldnt be storing the password or any other privileged info in the session... what i mean is for example the username, and pk for that user in the db or maybe a list of "access groups" or something. –  prodigitalson Jan 22 '10 at 6:19
    
The information being stored is along the lines of what Joel Etherton referenced in his response, that being email address, username, account preferences. So only those things related to the user. Also you touched on it but it wasn't in your example but your recommendation is that the logout operation also be carried on by the Auth object -- possibly in the form of a deauthenticate method. –  Andre Jan 22 '10 at 7:24
show 2 more comments

The session is a good place for holding user data that you want to have managed in some sort of state across various pages or if you need a fast accessible way to get at it without hitting the database. It is a bad idea to keep secure information (re: passwords/etc) in the session, but rapid access information like username, name, email address, preferences, etc is all good data to put in the session. Try to keep it simple though.

Keep in mind though, that the session (or related cookie) should only ever be used for identification. It should not be used for authentication.

Authentication object is a good method. Make sure that it only holds secure information as long as it needs to and that it has all the necessary functions available to keep sensitive data protected.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree, and so storing the password is not on the list of user data that is stored. –  Andre Jan 22 '10 at 4:27
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.