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I was given the following code:

public int func(int n){
  if(n == 1)
     return 2;
  else 
     return 3 * func(n-1)+1;
}

I can understand recursion in things like factorial and fibonacci, but for this one I cant. I tried to trace the logic:

if n is 3:
return 3 * func(2) + 1
return 3 * func(1) + 1
return 3 * 2 + 1
return 7

I always end up with 7 with any other number and I know this is wrong because I get different values when I run the program. Can you help me understand how recursion works here?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think this is self-explanatory, if you need more informations just comment !

if n is 3:
return 3 * func(2) + 1
return 3 * (3 * func(1) + 1) + 1 //func(2) is equals to 3 * func(1) + 1
return 3 * (3 * 2 + 1) + 1 //func(1) is equals to 2
return 22
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if n is 3

func(3)
=3*func(2)+1
=3*(3*func(1)+1)+1
=3*(3*2+1)+1
=22

if n is 4

func(4)
=3*func(3)+1
=3*22+1
=67
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You're close, but missing a key point:

func(3) is: 3 * func(2) + 1
func(2) is: 3 * func(1) + 1
func(1) is: 2

Therefore, func(2) is 3*2+1 = 7.
And func(3) is 3*7+1 = 22 
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You have to reinput that value you get for the deepest recursion call into the previous level and so forth.

func(1) = 2
func(2) = 3 * func(1) + 1 = 7
func(3) = 3 * func(2) + 1 = 22
func(4) = 3 * func(3) + 1 = 67
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  • If n is 1 it returns 2 (so func(1) = 2).
  • If n is 2 it returns 3 * func(1) + 1, which is 3 * 2 + 1 = 7 (so func(2) = 7).
  • If n is 3 it returns 3 * func(2) + 1, which is 3 * 7 + 1 = 22 (so func(3) = 22).
  • If n is 4 it returns 3 * func(3) + 1, which is 3 * 22 + 1 = 67 (so func(4) = 67).
  • ...

And so on. In other words, when n = 1 it simply returns 2 and it all other cases it returns the value for func(n - 1) times three and with one added.

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upvote for best plain-text explanation –  Jason Fingar Jan 15 at 23:00

when n=3 you get

func(3) = > return 3 * func(2) + 1

where func(2) is

func(2) = > return 3 * func(1) + 1

where func(1) is

func(1) = > return 2

once you combine them you get that

func(3) => return 3 * (3 * (2) + 1) + 1

func(3) => return 22
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