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I have two files. The first file File_A.txt with n number of columns is like this:

SRK_00017   MRS10904.1
SRK_00017   MRS14430.1
SRK_00005   MRS13611.1
... 

The second file File_B.txt looks like:

MRS10904.1  DMN02113.10
MRS10983.1  DMN07690.11
SRK_00011   DMN02311.14
MRS13611.1  DMN12833.2
MRS10981.1  DMN00149.23
SRK_00011   DMN02872.13
MRS14430.1  DMN12777.2
SRK_00005   DMN00659.13
SRK_04765   DMN12781.2
SRK_04765   DMN03028.10
MRS13611.1  DMN1234.10
SRK_00017   DMN03028.10
SRK_00017   DMN03029.10
SRK_14211   DMN13843.1
SRK_00017   DMN00069.20
MRS10904.1  DMN00659.13
....

I want to create a new third file File_C.txt like:

SRK_00017       DMN03028.10     DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017       DMN03029.10     DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017       DMN00069.20     DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017       DMN03028.10     DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017       DMN03029.10     DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017       DMN00069.20     DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017       DMN03028.10     DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017       DMN03028.10     DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017       DMN00069.20     DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00005       DMN00659.13     DMN12833.2  MRS13611.1
SRK_00005       DMN00659.13     DMN1234.10  MRS13611.1
....

The second file contains the values (as DMN..) of the IDs SRK_ and MRS. All the SRK_ are in coulmn1 of File_A and all the MRS are in coulmn2 of File_A. Any of the SRK_ and MRS may have multiple DMN values (given in File_B). What I actually want in my File_C is all the possible pairing of the values of SRK_ and MRS belongs to one row of File_A. For example the first row in File_A is SRK_00017 MRS10904.1 and if we will look at File_B SRK_00017 has three DMN values (DMN03028.10, DMN03029.10, DMN00069.20) and the MRS10904.1 also has two DMN values (DMN02113.10 and DMN00659.13). So for the first row of File_A there will have 3*2 = 6 possible pairs of DMN. There are in the first six lines of resultant File_C.txt. I hope I am able to convey my question.

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1  
In your expected output: Why is DMN02113.10 occuring in column 3 in the six top rows? Shouldn't there be some DMN00659.13 there? – Håkon Hægland Jan 15 '14 at 23:37

Using awk

awk 'NR==FNR{a[$1]++;b[$1 FS a[$1]]=$2;next}
{for (i=1;i<=a[$2];i++)
      for (j=1;j<=a[$1];j++)
         print $1,b[$1 FS j],b[$2 FS i],$2
}' File_B.txt File_A.txt

SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN12833.2 MRS13611.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN1234.10 MRS13611.1
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+1 Nice one.. Clever trick to get the order right:) – Håkon Hægland Jan 16 '14 at 0:20

In Gnu Awk version 4.1 you can use arrays of arrays like

gawk 'NR==FNR {
    a[$1][$2]++
    next
}
{
    for (i in a[$1])
        for (j in a[$2])
            print $1, i, j, $2
}' File_B.txt File_A.txt 

Output:

SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN12833.2 MRS13611.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN1234.10 MRS13611.1
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Looks easlier with arrays of arrays, but the only problem is, can't control the display order. Second, the ++ is useless – BMW Jan 16 '14 at 0:10
    
@BMW Sure you are right! What do you mean by display order? – Håkon Hægland Jan 16 '14 at 0:12
    
the output by your command is in different order. – BMW Jan 16 '14 at 0:13
    
@BMW Yes, but is the order important? – Håkon Hægland Jan 16 '14 at 0:14
    
not sure, need the requester to clarify it. – BMW Jan 16 '14 at 0:20

Here is a Perl version.

Note: I have left out any error checking for the sake of clarity (not sure what the policy is on that here).

open my $file_a, '<', 'File_A.txt';
open my $file_b, '<', 'File_B.txt';
open my $file_c, '>', 'File_C.txt';
my %map;
foreach (<$file_b>) {
    chomp;
    my ($id,$dmn) = split;
    push(@{ $map{$id} },$dmn);
}
foreach (<$file_a>) {
    chomp;
    my ($srk,$mrs) = split;
    for my $dmn2 ( @{ $map{$mrs} } ) {
        for my $dmn1 ( @{ $map{$srk} } ) {
            print $file_c "$srk $dmn1 $dmn2 $mrs\n";
        }
    }
}
close $file_a;
close $file_b;
close $file_c;

File_C.txt contains:

SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN12833.2 MRS13611.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN1234.10 MRS13611.1
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Here is a shell-script version, using sort and join. This works for me on 12.04 and :

#!/bin/bash

sort $2 > $2.MRS.SRK

sort $1 > $1.SRK
join $1.SRK $2.MRS.SRK | sed 's/^\([^ ]*\) \+/\1:/' | sort > SRK.join

sort -k2 $1 > $1.MRS
join -o "1.1 1.2 2.2" -1 2 $1.MRS $2.MRS.SRK | sed 's/^\([^ ]*\) \+/\1:/' | sort > MRS.join

join SRK.join MRS.join | sed 's/\([^ ]*\):\([^ ]*\) \([^ ]* [^ ]*\)/\1 \3 \2/'

Output is:

ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ ./DMN.sh File_A.txt File_B.txt 
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN1234.10 MRS13611.1
SRK_00005 DMN00659.13 DMN12833.2 MRS13611.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN00659.13 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN02113.10 MRS10904.1
SRK_00017 DMN00069.20 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN03028.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
SRK_00017 DMN03029.10 DMN12777.2 MRS14430.1
ubuntu@ubuntu:~$ 

Ignoring sorts, the basic flow is:

  1. join on field 1 of both files (the "SRK" field). Ensure field output order is "SRK MRS DMN"
  2. sed a colon in between "SRK" and "MRS" fields in resulting output, so these two fields appear as one field to future joins
  3. join on field 2 of FileA and field 1 of FileB (the "MRS" field). Ensure field output order is "SRK MRS DMN"
  4. sed a colon in between "SRK" and "MRS" fields in resulting output, so these two fields appear as one field to future joins
  5. join results of 2. and 4. above on the "SRK:MRS" field
  6. sed to remove the colon and move the resulting output fields into the order "SRK DMN DMN MRS"

Note input to join must be sorted on the join field, so sorts are effectively required before each join here. So no guarantees on the sort order of the final output. But I think that would normally be the case for any kind of DB join.


This can also be rewritten all as one (long) command, without the intermediate files, and using bash primitives instead of sed:

join <(
  join <(
    sort File_A.txt) <(
    sort File_B.txt) |
  while read a b; do echo "$a:$b"; done | sort) <(
  join -o "1.1 1.2 2.2" -1 2 <(
    sort -k2 File_A.txt) <(
    sort File_B.txt) |
  while read a b; do echo "$a:$b"; done | sort) |
while IFS=" :" read a b c d; do echo "$a $c $d $b"; done > File_C.txt

Note join can read only one of its input files from stdin, so <() process substitution is used extensively to pipe input to join.

Note also both input files must effectively be read twice.

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