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I made a small game that requires to play background music on it, I have images, a txt file and an audio file, they all work after exporting the JAR except for the audio file.

here is the code I used to import :

The Images :

(new ImageIcon(getClass().getResource("/data/131868.jpg"))

The Text file :

BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(getClass().getResourceAsStream("/data/dictionnaire.txt")));

The Audio file ( I included also the code to play it that I found while searching) :

File f =new File(Main.class.getResource("/data/gmu.mp3").getFile());
final Player p=Manager.createRealizedPlayer(f.toURI().toURL());

        p.start();
        while(true){
            if(p.getMediaTime().getSeconds()==p.getDuration().getSeconds()){
                p.stop();
                p.setMediaTime(new Time(0));
                p.start();
            }
        }

Basically the File Object was : File f = new File("/data/gmu.mp3") I just added modifications to make it look like the others ...

It did work in Eclipse, but not JAR.

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3 Answers 3

Solution

Try placing the gmu.mp3 inside the source before exporting the jar.

Why?

When you export a jar, it wraps all the fun code up that is inside the source folder. File f = new File("/data/gmu.mp3") simply points the program to that file names gmu.mp3 in the file system. If you place the gmu.mp3 inside the source folder and update the File constructor to reflect the new location, the mp3 should get wrapped up into the jar along with all the code.

Let me know how it goes -Scott

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I put the audio file in the source folder src and updated the File object to be File("/data/gmu.mp3") but I still get the same result, I don't know how this could work since I point my resource folder already ? –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 4:52
    
I want to make sure the jar you're compiling actually contains the resource you point at. A jar can be executed from anywhere. The file you point to is relative to the execution position, unless the file is placed inside the compiled jar. –  Scott Jan 16 '14 at 7:17
    
The Audio File is in a data folder which is in the src folder, with all the other resources, when I export the java, The other ressources are all inside the JAR and they all work, except for the audio –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 14:16

A java.io.File represents a jar-ed file as "ThePacked.jar!/path/inside/file.mp3", which makes problem when used as a File.

To read a jar-ed file's content, you can read from an InputStream given by getResourceAsStream(String filename).

or

To use the file as a real java.io.File, (what I did is to) read it from the InputStream and copy it to a location outside the jar (eg. to a temprary file).

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can you give me portions of code ? –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 4:54
    
I've another answer at stackoverflow.com/questions/19299470/… contains code for the "copy file solution". –  ren78min Jan 16 '14 at 5:01
    
so according to your link, the File I would use into final Player p=Manager.createRealizedPlayer(f.toURI().toURL()) would be fo ?? –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 5:11
    
If your Manager can accept an InputStream, use InputStream is the best way; otherwise, I suppose copy the mp3 to a temp-file and then final Player p=Manager.createRealizedPlayer(tempFileUrl) –  ren78min Jan 16 '14 at 5:19
    
Here is the code I added : File f =new File(Main.class.getResource("/tp/gmu.mp3").getFile()); InputStream fi = Main.class.getResourceAsStream("/tp/gmu.mp3"); File temp = File.createTempFile("temp", ""); OutputStream fo = new FileOutputStream(temp); byte[] b = new byte[1024]; int count = 0; while ((count = fi.read(b)) != -1) { fo.write(b, 0, count); } I get error at Manager.createRealizedPlayer(fo.toURI().toURL()); toTUI is undefined for outpoutstream –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 5:44

You'd better know that: File is just the name of the file, not the file itself. Like the house number, it tells you the house's location, but is doesn't represent the house.

So, you can use it like this:

InputStream is = this.getClass().getResourceAsStream("/data/gmu.mp3");

File fi = new File(is);

Tell me the result:)

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1  
How do I represent the file itself then ? –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 4:14
    
You can use FileReader. It will read the file's content. –  niushuai Jan 16 '14 at 5:05
    
If I use it, I can't use f.toURI().toURL() since FileReader has no toURI method, and I cannot dast f –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 5:27
    
Give me the result: System.out.println(f.toURI().toURL()); –  niushuai Jan 16 '14 at 8:33
    
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.Error: Unresolved compilation problem: The method toURI() is undefined for the type FileReader –  FrankelStein Jan 16 '14 at 14:14

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