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I have models User, Photo and Favorite, where favorites is a join table from users to photos, i.e.:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :favorites
  has_many :photos, through: `favorites`
end

class Photo < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :favorites
  has_many :users, through: `favorites`
end

class Favorite < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :user
  belongs_to :photo
end

Say that @user is an instance of User and photo_ids is an array of primary keys of Photos. What's the fastest and/or most succinct way to add all of those photos to @user.photos?

The best I can up with is:

@user.favorites.create( photo_ids.map { |id| {photo_id: id } } )

But this seems pretty verbose to me. Does Rails not have a better way of handling this?

Other questions talk about creating multiple has_many: through: associations through a nested form but I'm trying to do this in a JSON API so there are no forms involved.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about

@user.photos << Photo.find_all_by_id(photo_ids)
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Didn't realise you could use << on an ActiveRecord association. Thanks! –  GeorgeMillo Jan 16 at 9:49
    
Also note that object on the right is an array - it still works though. –  BroiSatse Jan 16 at 10:00
    
Actually I don't think this would work, wouldn't Photo.find_by_id only return one result? Photo.where(id: photo_ids) or Photo.find(photo_ids) both work fine though. –  GeorgeMillo Jan 16 at 10:04
    
Ah, you're right. I'll update the answer –  BroiSatse Jan 16 at 10:07
1  
Cool. Worth noting that find_by_* and find_all_by_* syntax is deprecated in Rails 4. I used where but the effect is the same. –  GeorgeMillo Jan 16 at 10:12

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