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I have the following class structure:

enter image description here

The fact is that each request does not share anything as when I process the requests I do a typeof / cast. The reason to have the empty root class is to limit at compile time which classes you can pass to the method processing the requests:

void ProcessRequest(Request request)

Is this design flawed somehow? It feels strange to me to have an empty root class / interface.

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It's perfectly ok. but dont do the cast, create a method in Request: class Request { void Apply(ref to_what_type to_what) { ... } } –  Exceptyon Jan 16 '14 at 9:56
1  
I think that you have one method handling the processing of different types of requests is an even more troubling sign of possible bad design. Why process them all using the same method if they share nothing? –  Zache Jan 16 '14 at 9:56
1  
@Zache: They are requests sent to a single entry point of a communication system that after receiving it casts and sends them to the right class to process them. That's why we have a single method receiving Request. –  Ignacio Soler Garcia Jan 16 '14 at 10:16

3 Answers 3

With the help of your clarifying comment I would do things like this. In this case I don't think that an empty class is needed. Some times you get so into doing things the "OO-way" using inheretance were simple method overloading should accomplish what you need. In my example the generics might actually be overboard, you could just split your void Process(Request request) into several methods if you just if/else on types.

public class RequestA
{
}

public class RequestB
{
}

public class RequestC
{
}

public class RequestProcesser :
    IProcessRequest<RequestA>,
    IProcessRequest<RequestB>,
    IProcessRequest<RequestC>
{
    public void Process<RequestA>(RequestA request)
    {
    }

    public void Process<RequestB>(RequestB request)
    {
    }

    public void Process<RequestC>(RequestC request)
    {
    }
}

public interface IProcessRequest<TRequest>
{
    void Process<TRequest>(TRequest request);
}
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Take a look at "Marker interface pattern" at Wikipedia that explains some pros & cons of this approach.

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This is called a marker interface.

Ideally you would remove the runtime casting and do a natural inheritance based solution. I assume that is not possible or else you wouldn't have asked.

Given that, using a marker interface is a little better than just typing everything as object because it is less prone to human error. It is more self-documenting which is good.

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