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This seems impossible to me, but StackOverflow has solved things that seemed impossible to me before, so here it goes:

I have a predefined mapping between filenames and ids, I would like to be able to map __FILE__ to it's id at compile time if at all possible.

Sorry for the shoddy explanation, I hope an example helps:

Ids generated before the compilation process starts through some script:

#define _FILE_IDS_MAIN_CPP 1
#define _FILE_IDS_HELPER_CPP 2
#define _FILE_IDS_HELPER_HPP 3

In the code I'd like to be able to do something like this:

printf("%d", GET_FILEID_MACRO(__file__));

Thanks.

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2  
Can you give an example of code you'd like to be able to write? –  Joseph Mansfield Jan 16 at 10:26
    
@sftrabbit Added an example. Sorry I wasn't more clear –  Afiefh Jan 16 at 10:32
    
Does it have to be at compile-time? –  JorenHeit Jan 16 at 10:33
    
You need C++11 and constexpr. –  David Schwartz Jan 16 at 10:33
2  
Then you can't manipulate strings at compile time, sorry. –  David Schwartz Jan 16 at 10:39
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2 Answers 2

To get you started, you can probably use constexpr functions, available since C++11, to perform some computation on the file name characters. For example, if you simply let the string length be your ID, you could have:

template <unsigned int N>
constexpr unsigned int FileID(char const (&a)[N])
{
    // your computation goes here
    return N;
}

#include <iostream>
template <unsigned int N> void print()
{
    std::cout << "Static value: " << N << "\n";
}

int main()
{
    print<FileID(__FILE__)>();
}

The print template is included as proof that the number is computed at compile time.

Taking this as a starting point, you could change FileID into some kind of hash function, or perhaps into a static map lookup - this is certainly possible, though probably fairly verbose. I'm sure someone has done it already, though.

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Correct me if I'm mistaken, but wouldn't that map all files with the same name length to the same ID? Also I'm stick with C++98 so I don't get C++11 goodness :-( –  Afiefh Jan 16 at 10:41
    
@Afiefh: Yes. That's why I said it's a starting point that needs to be worked on. (Unless you're creating PHP, in which case you're done.) –  Kerrek SB Jan 16 at 10:44
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Having C++11:

#include <cstring>
#include <iostream>

constexpr unsigned id(const char* file) {
    return (std::strcmp(file, "One") == 0) ? 1 : 0;
}

template<unsigned>
void print() {
    std::cout << "Zero\n";
}

template<>
void print<1>() {
    std::cout << "One\n";
}

int main () {
    print<id("Zero")>();
    print<id("One")>();
    return 0;
}

Being unsure if strcmp is valid in a constexpr function and following the second answer in the link from @MSalters:

#include <iostream>

// Code from @Robert Mason
// =======================

constexpr bool static_strequal_helper(const char * a, const char * b, unsigned len) {
   return (len == 0) ? true : ((*a == *b) ? static_strequal_helper(a + 1, b + 1, len - 1) : false);
}

template <unsigned N1, unsigned N2>
constexpr bool static_strequal(const char (&str1)[N1], const char (&str2)[N2]) {
   return (N1 == N2) ? static_strequal_helper(&(str1[0]), &(str2[0]), N1) : false;
}

// End


template <unsigned N>
constexpr unsigned id(const char (&file)[N]) {
    return (static_strequal(file, "One")) ? 1 : 0;
}

template<unsigned>
void print() {
    std::cout << "Zero\n";
}

template<>
void print<1>() {
    std::cout << "One\n";
}

int main () {
    print<id("Zero")>();   // Prints Zero
    print<id("One")>();    // Prints One
    print<id(__FILE__)>(); // Prints Zero - Is __FILE__ always an array?
    return 0;
}
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Wow, nice, is that guaranteed to work by the standard? –  Kerrek SB Jan 16 at 10:42
    
No, see stackoverflow.com/questions/11144118/… –  MSalters Jan 16 at 10:46
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