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I am having trouble designing a module, can anybody help me?

Because it will be hard to maintain this kind of module, I also think that this can test my skill of design pattern usage.

Requirement

This is basically an agricultural project (web application). I need to design a module where some calculation takes place.

There are different crops involved like maize, tomato, okra etc. Each of these crops has different traits.

Each trait has a measurement scale which lies in integer like 200-1000. Now let's say I have planted the crop and done measurement noted down the traits. Now I want to do some sort of measurement. Some measurements are simple and some are complex.

Example

Lets take an example of crop maize. I have recorded observations for 15 traits. (We'll use trait1-trait15 as examples, the actual name can be like plt_ht, yld, etc.)

I recorded 5 observations for each trait:

trait1 trait2 trait3 trait5 trait6..... trait15
01,02,03,04 01,02,03,04 01,02,03,04

User logs into system and selects his crops and enters data for these observations. I have to calculate either average or sum of the data entered for each trait.

Complexity / centre of the problem

So far it's simple but complexity comes when I have some different formulas for some of the traits.

Example: trait YLD has a formula based on which I have to calculate its value, which may also depend on some other traits. Each different crop can have different traits.

All this I am able to do - whenever user selects crop I will check for those specific traits and do calculations (if it's not a special trait then I either average or sum it, based on db entry), but there is a lot of hard coding. I would like to have suggestions on a better way of handling this.

My code needs to handle both simple and complex calculations. Simple calculations are easy, I have take average of value entered for trait. The problem comes when I have to do complex calculations, since each crop have different traits with their own formulas, so to calculate I have to check for crop and then for complex trait. So I have to hardcode the trait name of complex traits. Can any tell me how I can design this using Java oops [?!?] so that I can make it generic?

I have about 10 different crops. Some calculations are specific to crops, so there will be lot of code like the if below:

hasZeroValue = (HashMap<String, ArrayList<String>>) dataValues[1];
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("TLSSG_70")) {
    traitAvg=calculateTLCV(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues,50);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("TLSSG_100")) {
    traitAvg=calculateTLCV(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues,50);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("YVMV_60")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("YVMV_90")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("YVMV_120")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("ELCV_60")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("ELCV_90")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("ELCV_120")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("OK") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("YVMV_60")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("OK") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("YVMV_90")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg,dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("OK") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("YVMV_120")) {
    traitAvg=tomatoYVMVCalculation(traitName, traitAvg, dataPoint, dataTraits, hybrid, repl, traitValues, dataPvalues);
} else if(cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("OK") && traitName.equalsIgnoreCase("ELCV_60")) {

Should class be written per crop , think of it as application which supports 109 crops , now each user logs into system , i have link where he can do this above exercise, would it be better that crop be one class.There could 100 of traits per crop should this be also per Trait.Please let me know.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by bigstones, Roman C, Andrew, LarsTech, Achrome Jan 16 '14 at 22:00

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers 3

Encapsulate the traits and crops into separate classes first of all you'd probably want to create some abstract classes like Crop.class and Trait.class which would contain the basic skeleton and the things in common for all crops or traits, afterwards you can extend these classes and make an individual class for each specific crop or trait, this way the specific classes will contain information and processes specific to that crop or trait and still maintain the general functionality of Crop.class and Trait.class respectively.

You could also create a similar pattern for individual or sets of operations that you need to perform on the traits for example.

The idea here is to spread it out in a more maintainable manner that will make adding more crops and traits or modifying existing ones a breeze.


EDIT :

If you have an arbitrary number of crops/traits, then writing a separate class per crop is not going to be the solution here. And the individuality of crops will come from certain properties and states of the more generalized classes.

However if per chance some crops/traits have similar/same functions/traits (which I assume they would since you mention around 100 crops/traits etc) you can group them under a separate class. (GrainCrop.class or something along the lines)

This means that you'd still want to have the Crop.class and Trait.class abstract, but instead of grouping each crop to a separate class you'd group em in packs of similar crops, which would allow you to easily access or limit the scope to a certain subset of crops for example.

Also you can still simplify certain tasks so they are not looking so bulky, and even perhaps spread them across separate classes.

From your example if we analyze it we can see that the most repeating properties there are the crop IDs (cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("OK") and cropId.equalsIgnoreCase("TO"))

So instead of countless times checking whether the crop id is "TO" or "OK" you could check that once and have 2 separate branches for checking "TO" properties and "OK" properties.

Also if perhaps some crops have the same common set of operations then you could group them under BasicCropOperations.class and then perhaps divide up the rest of the complex operations into similar behavior sets like EnvironmentalCropOperations.class or something if for example there were things like heat and humidity involved.

The idea is still the same though, divide everything into smaller modules within reason. (ex: writing 200 classes for different crops/traits is not reasonable)

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I have added few points at the end of queestion above.Please look at it. –  Vividata Jan 16 '14 at 13:05
    
@vividata this solution should cover that edit –  Pureferret Jan 16 '14 at 13:35

The overall solution to this depends on details you haven't told us. We don't know whether you expect to write code for the complex calculations, implying that you can have a class per crop, or whether you expect to be able to add a crop or change a calculation without having to change code.

Some things you're doing can be improved right off, however. Your pattern of if a && b then x else if a && c then y else if a && d, etc., can be changed to:

if a
{
  if b { x }
  else if c { y }

...
}

More importantly, assuming you can make classes for the crops and/or the calculations, you can store a collection of such objects and use them to replace the if/then/else sequence. For example: create a hashmap of objects indexed by your 'traitName' value above; instead of if/then/else, get a reference to the corresponding object using HashMap.get(), and put the calculation method in that object.

I suppose you could call these design patterns, but it isn't what's usually meant by the term.

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On the risk of this being seen as a frivolous answer or not answer at all... Don't use Java for this, use Scala or a dynamic language like Ruby. You even used the right name for this kind of thing in Scala: a "trait".

Design patterns can be useful, but once they're not used for their convenience but to solve gross deficiencies in the suitability of a language to solve your problem, I think it's time to jump technologies.

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