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Well aware that DLR is here!! I have recently reading up on all of these and was wondering if there were any specific benefits of using one language over another?

For example performance benefits! and available functionality through standard libaries!!

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4  
F# is not a dynamic language and is not based on DLR. – Brian Jan 22 '10 at 16:33
    
Yes strictly it does not implement all dynamic features. research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/cambridge/projects/fsharp/… So yes you could not compare F# with ironruby or ironpython. – Aim Kai Jan 22 '10 at 17:15
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Which language/technology is best for the job always depends on what you actually want to do. – sth Jan 23 '10 at 14:52
    
Definitely agree with that last comment. – Aim Kai Jan 27 '10 at 10:21
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The answer is "depends".

F# is great if you need to functional programming is used extensively by Academics that need its pure computing power to get something done.

IronPython and IronRuby is great for being able to create applications that run on the CLR because they give you the .NET goodness with the speed of writing Python or Ruby. I don't think that any of these is more preferable to another without it being in a proper context

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My main focus really is for web apps and system admin tools!! With Django my feelings would be that IronPython would be more useful for a .net developer? – Aim Kai Jan 22 '10 at 9:50
    
as Django is a python project IronPython would be the only choice for .NET – AutomatedTester Jan 22 '10 at 10:41
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You may want to check out ndjango.org, it's an django port to .NET using F#. – Robert Jan 22 '10 at 14:27
    
Thanks for that will have a look :) – Aim Kai Jan 22 '10 at 15:46
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Functional programming has left the academics status long ago. SQL, XSLT + XPath, Haskell, LISP and now LINQ and F# are all functional languages or technologies that have found their way into typical business scenarios, most notably data processing and semantic web scenarios. – Abel Apr 12 '10 at 13:12

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