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Let's suppose I have this simple snippet:

async void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    await Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        Console.WriteLine("start");
        Thread.Sleep(5000);
        Console.WriteLine("end");
    });
}

Obviously, everytime I push that button a new task is started even when a previous task still runs. How would I postpone any new task until all previous tasks have finished?

Some more details:

In the example above, each new task is identical to the task before. However, in the original context the sequence of tasks matters: Parameters may change (I could "simulate" it by using DateTime.Now.Ticks). The tasks should be executed in the order they are "registered". Specificly, my program will talk to a serial device. I've done this before with a background thread utilizing a BlockingCollection. However, this time there's a strict request/response-protocol and I'd like to use async/await if it is possible.

Possible solution:

I could imagine creating tasks and storing them in a list. But how would I execute the tasks with respect to the requirements? Or should I return to the thread-based solution I have used before?

share|improve this question
3  
You can still use ConcurrentQueue or BlockingCollection. Since it's a producer-consumer scenario, the latter should be the best fit. –  Patryk Ćwiek Jan 16 at 13:31
    
Sure. But as I see it, I would need to wait on the queue and loop it. Would I store Tasks or data to create a task? Would I loop the queue inside a Task or would the loop start a Task? Nevertheless, this wouldn't be much of a problem, but I was hoping that there's another way more suitable for that request/response pattern. –  JeffRSon Jan 16 at 14:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could wait on a SemaphoreSlim asynchronously and release it once the job is done. Don't forget to configure the semaphore initialcount to 1.

private static SemaphoreSlim semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(1);

private async static void DoSomethingAsync()
{
     await semaphore.WaitAsync();
     try
     {
        await Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("start");
            Thread.Sleep(5000);
            Console.WriteLine("end");
        });
     }
     finally
     {
        semaphore.Release();
     }
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DoSomethingAsync();
    DoSomethingAsync();
    Console.Read();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Dont forget a Try-finally and release the semaphone in the finally clause ! Otherwise, it might lead to a quite frustrating behavior for the user if an exception is thrown in your task :) –  Olivier Jan 16 at 13:48
    
@Olivier Thanks, updated very obvious one! –  Sriram Sakthivel Jan 16 at 14:21
    
This is exactly what I need to queue the occassional concurrent access! –  JeffRSon Jan 16 at 14:22
    
You may want to move await semaphore.WaitAsync(); outside try. –  Noseratio Jan 17 at 12:02
1  
@Noseratio It is not documented to throw exceptions. but anyway valid point, let me update my answer thank you :) –  Sriram Sakthivel Jan 17 at 12:25

I recommend using a SemaphoreSlim for synchronization. However, you want to avoid Task.Factory.StartNew (as I explain on my blog), and also definitely avoid async void (as I explain in the MSDN article).

private SemaphoreSlim _mutex = new SemaphoreSlim(1);
async void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
  await Task.Run(async () =>
  {
    await _mutex.WaitAsync();
    try
    {
      Console.WriteLine("start");
      Thread.Sleep(5000);
      Console.WriteLine("end");
    }
    finally
    {
      _mutex.Release();
    }
  });
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for linking to your articles! Very nice! BTW, when I tried your example I had to mark the lambda expression with async in order to be able to compile it. Is this correct? –  JeffRSon Jan 16 at 14:30
    
@StephenCleary, is there any reason we cannot just await the previous task, like this? –  Noseratio Jan 17 at 6:09
2  
@Noseratio: That approach also works. IMO the SemaphoreSlim code has clearer intent; it's not obvious from the await-previous-task code that it's important to copy the previous task. –  Stephen Cleary Jan 17 at 13:24

What about trying the Dataflow.ActionBlock<T> with the (default) max degree of parallelism of 1. This way you don't need to worry about any of the thread safety / locking concerns.

It could look something like:

...
var _block = new ActionBlock<bool>(async b =>
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("start");
                    await Task.Delay(5000);
                    Console.WriteLine("end");
                });
...


async void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    await _block.SendAsync(true);
}

You could also setup the ActionBlock to receive a Task or Func<Task>, and simply run / await this input. Which would allow multiple operations to be queued and awaited from different sources.

share|improve this answer

I might be missing something, but I don't think SemaphoreSlim is needed for the OP's scenario. I'd do it the following way. Basically, the code just await the previous pending instance of the task before continuing (no exception handling for clarity):

// the current pending task (initially a completed stub)
Task _pendingTask = Task.FromResult<bool>(true);

async void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    var previousTask = _pendingTask;

    _pendingTask = Task.Run(async () =>
    {
        await previousTask;

        Console.WriteLine("start");
        Thread.Sleep(5000);
        Console.WriteLine("end");
    });

    // the following "await" is optional, 
    // you only need it if you have other things to do 
    // inside "button_Click" when "_pendingTask" is completed
    await _pendingTask;
}

[UPDATE] To address the comment, here's a thread-safe version, when button_Click can be called concurrently:

Task _pendingTask = Task.FromResult<bool>(true);
object _pendingTaskLock = new Object();

async void button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
{
    Task thisTask;

    lock (_pendingTaskLock)
    {
        var previousTask = _pendingTask;

        // note the "Task.Run" lambda doesn't stay in the lock
        thisTask = Task.Run(async () =>
        {
            await previousTask;

            Console.WriteLine("start");
            Thread.Sleep(5000);
            Console.WriteLine("end");
        });

        _pendingTask = thisTask;
    }

    await thisTask;
}
share|improve this answer
    
There may be more than one "pending" task. –  JeffRSon Jan 17 at 9:35
    
@JeffRSon, it works with more than one, as long they're all started with button_Click (or another wrapper method). This is how I tested the initial version of this: for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) button_Click(null, null); It works because it captures the member _pendingTask into the local previousTask for use inside the Task.Run lambda. –  Noseratio Jan 17 at 10:15
    
Ah - okay. So you would rely on the GUI thread as a means of "synchronization". –  JeffRSon Jan 17 at 10:27
    
@JeffRSon, no. This approach works equally well in a console app without any synchronization context, give it a try. –  Noseratio Jan 17 at 10:32
    
No - I mean, it's not thread-safe: if 2 threads execute var previousTask = _pendingTask; before a new _pendingTask is created. This cannot happen, of course, if all calls originate from the same thread (like GUI thread or main console app thread). –  JeffRSon Jan 17 at 10:38

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