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I tried a small experiment with C++ random number generator code. I will post the code for everyone to see.

unsigned int array[] = {0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0};
unsigned int rand_seed = 4567;
int loop = 0;

 srandom(rand_seed);
 while (loop < 2147483647)
 {
     array[random() % 10]++;
     loop++;
 }

 for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
 {
     cout << array[i] << endl;
 }

It's a simple code, not much to explain here. I learned that modulo operation causes a small bais, in this case the occurrence of 0 should be higher than other values since, 0 itself is counted and whenever 10 occurs. But when I display the contents of my array, the values are almost the same for all number between 0 and 9 (inclusive).

Can anyone let me know that this bias thing actually is correct or not? If yes that modulo operation does introduce bias, why can't I see it?

In math terms, can I say that my random variable X can have definite values between 0 and 9 (inclusive) and by ploting the frequency values (essentially array values), the resultant graph is a probability density function.

Just to make the question complete here is the result what I get in my array.

214765115
214745521
214749449
214749304
214747088
214733986
214745858
214743477
214760340
214743509

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all the answers provided are very well explained and therefore I am up voting all of them. Sadly I can select only one to close the thread. –  Psypher Jan 16 at 20:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's a simple code, not much to explain here. I learned that modulo operation causes a small bais, in this case the occurrence of 0 should be higher than other values since, 0 itself is counted and whenever 10 occurs.

not only 10, but every other number will wrap to something between [0,9] too, because modulo is done with 10 as divisor. So there is a mapping here from values returned by random() (i.e. let's assume [0,255], POSIX random() has wider range but the idea is important) to domain [0,9]. This introduces bias.

In math terms, can I say that my random variable X can have definite values between 0 and 9 (inclusive) and by ploting the frequency values (essentially array values), the resultant graph is a probability density function.

Definitely this is a distribution, however this is not uniform on range [0,9] but skewed to the left. In our example there are n=256 possibilities, and here is a probability density function

x f(x)
0 26/256
1 26/256
2 26/256
3 26/256
4 26/256
5 26/256
6 25/256
7 25/256
8 25/256
9 25/256
sum   1
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Does random() really return a value in the range [0,255]? (For that matter, what is random()? I know that there was a function by this name on some early Unix, but I can't find any information about it today.) –  James Kanze Jan 16 at 18:34
1  
random(), a POSIX standard, has wider range but the bias will arise in the same way –  0d0a Jan 16 at 18:59

The bias will be larger as the value of the modulo is increased, and smaller as the maximum random number is increase. In this case 10 is very small compared to the largest random number, so the bias will be almost immeasurable.

If you want to see a better example, use fewer of the bits returned for your random numbers.

int random_value = random() & 0xfff;
array[random_value % 10]++;
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How can we avoid such a bias? –  Psypher Jan 16 at 17:58
3  
@Psypher avoiding the numerical-comp stuff, use code that has already eliminated it for you, namely the <random> library provided in C++11 compliant implementations. Specific to that, std::uniform_int_distribution<>. Honestly that library is just outstanding. If at all possible, use it and avoid rand() like the plague. –  WhozCraig Jan 16 at 18:12
    
Otherwise you're stuck with selecting a modulus that evenly divides the initial range, and then doing a draw-and-discard algorithm. –  DavidO Jan 16 at 18:17
    
@DavidO Most good generators will have a range which is a prime number, which makes choosing that modulus difficult. The usual solution is to find the maximum value less than or equal to the largest value returned by the generator, and divisible by the interval, and discard values above it. –  James Kanze Jan 16 at 18:37
3  
@Psypher the only way to avoid a bias is to make sure the input range is an integer multiple of the output range. The usual way to do that is to throw out random numbers that are above that integer multiple. Assuming the random numbers are produced between 0 and 2147483647 inclusive, and you're taking modulo 10, that means discarding anything >= 2147483640. That should only occur 7 times out of 2147483648 on average so it won't be a big performance hit. P.S. those are the same odds of seeing a bias. –  Mark Ransom Jan 16 at 21:51

For the example, suppose that random returns a unsigned char so value between [0; 255]

Now if we use modulo % 10, we will have a little more 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 because of [250; 255].

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How can I test this. The random function I have always returns a number between 0 to 2^31 - 1. One more thing, when I plot the frequency, is it a probability density function? –  Psypher Jan 16 at 17:56

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