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I have the following problem. I have a file that I must:

  1. divide in cells to create an NxN grid;
  2. counts the particles in each cell;
  3. write the resulting numbers in a particular way.

The problem is the third point: I must write an NxN array each numbers represent the total numbers of particles in each cell, but I don't know how to write the file in an NxN array.

program eccen
    implicit none
    integer, parameter:: grid=200
    integer::i,j,k,n,m
    real*8,allocatable::f(:,:)
    real*8::xx(grid),yy(grid),mval,Mxval
    real*8,allocatable::x(:),y(:)

    open(10,file='coordXY.txt')
    n=0
    DO
       READ(10,*,END=100)
        n=n+1
    END DO

 100     continue
    rewind(10)

    allocate(x(n),y(n))

    do i=1, n
        read(10,*) x(i),y(i)
    end do

! create a grid
    mval=-15.
    Mxval=15.
    do i=1, grid
        xx(i) = mval + ((Mxval - mval)*(i-1))/(grid-1)
        yy(i) = mval + ((Mxval - mval)*(i-1))/(grid-1)
    end do

    open(20,file='fluxXY.dat')

! counts the paticles in each cell of the grid


    allocate(f(grid,grid))
    f=0
    do i=1,grid
        do j=1,grid
            m=0.
            do k=1, n
                if (x(k) > xx(i) .and. x(k) < xx(i+1) .and. &
                 & y(k) > yy(j) .and. y(k) < yy(j+1)) then  
                    m=m+1 ! CONTA IL NUMERO DI PARTICELLE
                end if
            end do
            f(i,j)=float(m+1)    
! THIS IS HOW I WRITE THE FILE BUT THIS SHOULD BE CHANGED
            write(20,*) f(i,:)

        end do
        write(20,*)
        print *,i
    end do    
end program eccen

Thanks a lot for Your help!

share|improve this question
    
Even after studying your sample program I must admit to still not understand what is being asked here. Are you asking how to represent a multidimensional array (a matrix, so to say) and how to write it out? –  ldigas Jan 16 at 21:50
    
@ Idigas: Yes, a matrix of gridgrid (grid is the numbers of cells in x and y axes). But in my program the file in unit 20 has only 3 columns and a lot of lines. I want, however, an array with gridgrid (columns*lines) –  Panichi Pattumeros PapaCastoro Jan 16 at 23:13
    
Without knowing how those three columns look it's hard to say, but try writing with an explicit format. –  francescalus Jan 17 at 8:38
    
Do you want the data to be formatted or unformatted? Are you sure there are only 3 columns? Switch off the line wrap on your editor - is it still 3 columns? –  cup Jan 17 at 10:01
    
to @cup , yes because i put the output.dat in a program that read only NxN files and give me errors that demonstrate me the file is written as an Mx3 rray, where M is a very high number higher of N or (or using my f90 code syntax) higher of grid. –  Panichi Pattumeros PapaCastoro Jan 17 at 16:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

[SOLVED]

I finally solve all my problems:

  1. using ifort with -no-wrap-margin -> work !

  2. using ifort with @Stefan tips -> work!

  3. use gfortran alone -> work !

The difference is in the file size: using the 1) solution the file is a bit larger than with the 2) solution. The 3) case, again, shows difference in file size respect the other cases (higher than the other two). Respectively:

  1. 60kb;
  2. 40kb;
  3. 65kb.

For a test file with grid=50 and an input file of 4001 lines and 2 rows (132kb).

Thanks You all!!!!!

share|improve this answer

The Intel Fortran Compiler (ifort) performs an automatic wrapping which fits 3 double precision numbers, while gfortran does not.

You should create an explicit format (mentioned by @francescalus):

1000  FORMAT(<grid>F16.8)

In this format, the variable grid can be used directly. Now you can specify your WRITE statement as

write(20,1000) f(i,:)
share|improve this answer
1  
ifort has the -no-wrap-margin compile flag (different spelling for Windows). <n> isn't portable, but there are ways around that (including *(F...) if one can call that portable). –  francescalus Jan 17 at 13:03

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