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Is there a function in Common Lisp that takes a string as an argument and returns a keyword?

Example: (keyword "foo") -> :foo

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5 Answers

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Here's a make-keyword function which packages up keyword creation process (interning of a name into the KEYWORD package). :-)

(defun make-keyword (name) (values (intern name "KEYWORD")))
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Almost, but not quite. When you create a keyword, you must also ensure that you set its value binding to itself. –  Vatine Jun 6 at 6:14
    
@Vatine I only have SBCL to test, and in SBCL, (symbol-value (intern "FOO" "KEYWORD")) already has the correct value. Besides, Alexandria implements it using the same approach also. –  Chris Jester-Young Jun 9 at 14:37
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The answers given while being roughly correct do not produce a correct solution to the question's example.

Consider:

CL-USER(4): (intern "foo" :keyword)

:|foo|
NIL
CL-USER(5): (eq * :foo)

NIL

Usually you want to apply STRING-UPCASE to the string before interning it, thus:

(defun make-keyword (name) (values (intern (string-upcase name) "KEYWORD")))
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It could be, of course, that OP just had print-case set to :downcase –  Joshua Taylor Jun 5 at 21:47
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There is a make-keyword function in the Alexandria library, although it does preserve case so to get exactly what you want you'll have to upcase the string first.

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Or set print-case to :downcase. intern doesn't do any case modification, so the solution here probably shouldn't either. (Although the example in the question does say (keyword "foo") => :foo, it's probably better to have (... "foo") => :|foo| or (... "FOO") => :FOO.) –  Joshua Taylor Jun 5 at 21:47
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In this example it also deals with strings with spaces (replacing them by dots):

(defun make-keyword (name) (values (intern (substitute #\. #\space (string-upcase name)) :keyword)))
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Is there a reason that you'd want to replace spaces with dots? If you intern "foo bar" you get a symbol with the name "foo bar", and there's no problem with that. intern doesn't replace spaces with dots, either. –  Joshua Taylor Jun 5 at 21:44
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(intern "foo") -> :foo

See the Strings section of the Common Lisp Cookbook for other string/symbol conversions and a detailed discussion of symbols and packages.

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The name needs to be interned in the "KEYWORD" package to be a keyword. e.g., (intern "FOO" "KEYWORD") –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 17 '08 at 11:24
    
ah yes. The (intern "foo" "KEYWORD") works quite nicely. Thank you. –  nathan Oct 17 '08 at 11:30
    
In my answer, I've packaged it up into a neat little function, which you may enjoy. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Oct 17 '08 at 11:33
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