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I'm new to C programming, and I'm trying to make a "shell", using fork() to make child-processes and execvp to send in commands. My goal is to make my program able to run processes both concurrently, and by waiting.

For example, if I type emacs test.sml, I would like my shell to open emacs with this file, and wait for the user to end emacs. (create a new child, and then the parent wait for the child to finish)

However, if I type emacs test.sml &, then I would like my shell to open emacs, and then be ready for a new command, even if the user keeps emacs open. (create a new child, and then the parent is ready for new input).

The code I've written so far does this, but it seems like the wait() only works on the first child. If I do the following:

  1. -> emacs
    • the parent waits (as desired)
  2. -> emacs &
    • the parent does not wait (as desired)
  3. -> emacs
    • the parent does not wait (undesired).

This is my main code. Setup fetches the user input, but its not relevant here:

int main(void)
{
    char inputBuffer[MAX_LINE];
    int background;
    char *args[MAX_LINE/+1];

    while(1) {
        background = 0;

        int mainpid = getpid();
        printf("My PID is %d\n",mainpid);
        printf(" COMMAND->\n");
        setup(inputBuffer,args,&background);

        pid_t pid; //Setting the PID
        pid = fork();

        if(pid < 0)
        {
            fprintf(stderr, "Fork Failed");
        }
        //background is 1 if the command ends with &
        if(background == 1)
        {
            if(pid==0)
            {
                printf("Child should run concurrently with parent\n");
                int pid = getpid();
                int ppid = getppid();
                printf("Child PID %d\n", pid);
                printf("Child PPID %d\n", ppid);
                execvp(inputBuffer, args);
                exit(1);
            }
            else
            {
                printf("Parent not waiting\n");
                int pid = getpid();
                printf("Parent PID %d\n", pid);
            }
        }
        else if(background != 1)
        {
            if(pid==0)
            {
                printf("Child running and parent waiting\n");
                int pid = getpid();
                int ppid = getppid();
                printf("Child PID %d\n", pid);
                printf("Child PPID %d\n", ppid);
                execvp(inputBuffer, args);
                exit(1);
            }
            else
            {
                printf("Parent WAIT\n");
                wait(NULL);
                printf("Parent done waiting\n");
                int pid = getpid();
                printf("Parent PID %d\n", pid);
            }
        }
    }
}

Any help greatly appreciated

share|improve this question
    
shell design is a huge subject. I would recommend you get the source for bash (for example) and ascertain how they do it. –  KevinDTimm Jan 16 at 21:53
    
This is a fairly complex task. if you fork a new process you must run a shell and set up the environment. At the command line type 'set' and you can see all the stuff that's in your environment. –  Jay Jan 16 at 21:53
1  
What would happen if you change wait(NULL) for waitpid(pid, NULL, NULL)? pid being the son's pid? –  Paulo Bu Jan 16 at 22:29
3  
You are probably misinterpreting the results. Case (1) works. Case (2) is not only not waited (and later repeaped by waitpid when it finishes) but it will exist until it is. Since you don't wait on any particular pid, when case (3) comes along you actually immediately reap #(2). –  Duck Jan 16 at 23:06
1  
@Jectson the pid you should wait for is the fork's return value on the parent process. –  Paulo Bu Jan 17 at 0:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you run a process in background, without waiting, sometime later it may (will) die. At that point, you may be waiting for another process started synchronously.

You should call wait() or waitpid() in a loop, looking for the PID of the process you just started, and cleaning up other zombie processes:

int status;
int corpse;

while ((corpse = waitpid(-1, &status, 0)) > 0 && corpse != new_pid)
    ...process the death of 'corpse' with exit status 'status'...

The processing in the body of the loop might be as trivial as a semi-colon; it might remove the corpse from the list of processes running in the background (which might, perhaps, otherwise be bringable into the foreground), etc. Although you could specify the new_pid as the first argument to waitpid(), that would leave you with other processes as zombies when you don't need to do so. And at some point, you have to clean up zombies — when better than while you're waiting for something else to finish? You could use wait() instead:

while ((corpse = wait(&status)) > 0 && corpse != new_pid)
share|improve this answer

execvp() may be failing.If it fails, it may appear that parent is not waiting

Please try changing this

execvp(inputBuffer, args);
exit(1);

to

if(execvp(inputBuffer, args)<0)
{
    printf("\n execvp failed");
    exit(1);
}

and see

share|improve this answer

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