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I'm currently learning about various application design approaches and there's one thing I can't really get my head around.

Let's say I have a physical device in my network, an IP surveillance camera. I need a model that represents 'IP surveillance cameras' to work with them in my application, which might look like this:

public class IPCamera {

    public string     Token      { get; set; }
    public IPAddress  IPAddress  { get; set; }
    public string     RtspUri    { get; set; }

}

Now, if I want to store the IPCamera into a database (e.g. with Entity Framework), I need maybe other/additional properties and thus, another model with:

   public int         Id         { get; set; }

Oh.. I want to access my application with via a WCF service. I can't use the object "IPAddress" here because it's not very serialization friendly, hence I need another model with a custom IP class that stores the IP address as string.

And last, an Android clients wants to access my data. I design a RESTful API using WebApi2. The client isn't interested in the cameras RTSPUri, but wants to know about the current state (is online, is offline).

I'm wondering: How to name all these models that they don't come in conflict? Should I design a model per each purpose/layer/service? And how to link/map them? With the adapter pattern?

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2 Answers 2

I would include everything in your entity and then create view models that only expose the properties that matter to the domain you're accessing your entities through.

Your entity:

public class IpCamera
{
    public int        Id         { get; set; }
    public string     Token      { get; set; }
    public IPAddress  IPAddress  { get; set; }
    public string     RtspUri    { get; set; }
    public bool       IsOnline   { get; set; }
}

In your WCF service:

public class IpCameraViewModel
{
    public int        Id         { get; set; }
    public string     IpAddress  { get; set; }
    public string     Token      { get; set; }
    public string     RtspUri    { get; set; }
}

In your api project:

public class IpCameraViewModel
{
    public int        Id         { get; set; }
    public string     IpAddress  { get; set; }
    public string     Token      { get; set; }
    public bool       IsOnline   { get; set; }
}

And you can just set the IpAddress as a string to send to a receiving client. You can shed away any properties you don't want to expose. Or you can add properties that don't belong to the IpCamera entity and just add them to your view model from another entity.

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As @Smith.h.Neil suggested, you should create one base normalized model (entity if you will) to store and several view models (projections).

You can easily map to/from view models using tools like AutoMapper.

As for the naming, I wouldn't use technical suffixes (like *ViewModel) in API layer. Think hard and figure out correct domain (business oriented) name of each projection. Like IpCameraStatus or perhaps just IpCamera (but in another namespace).

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