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FILE *fd;
if (fd=fopen(fileName,"r") == NULL)
{   
    printf("File failed to open");
    exit(1);
}

This is a code snippet. When I compile it with gcc, i get the following warning:-

warning: assignment makes pointer from integer without a cast

When I put fd=fopen(argv[2],"r") within brackets, the problem gets solved..

I am not able to understand where am i converting integer to pointer when the brackets are not put.

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up vote 13 down vote accepted

Due to operator precedence rules the condition is interpreted as fd=(fopen(fileName,"r") == NULL). The result of == is integer, fd is a pointer, thus the error message.

Consider the "extended" version of your code:

FILE *fd;
int ok;
fd = fopen(fileName, "r");
ok = fd == NULL;
// ...

Would you expect the last line to be interpreted as (ok = fd) == NULL, or ok = (fd == NULL)?

share|improve this answer
    
This answer actually explains the warning. – Richard Pennington Jan 22 '10 at 14:11

The precedence of the equality operator is higher than the assignment operator. Just change your code to:

FILE *fd;
if ((fd=fopen(fileName,"r")) == NULL)
{   
    printf("File failed to open");
    exit(1);
}
share|improve this answer

You need parenthesis around the assignment:

if ((fd=fopen(fileName,"r")) == NULL)
....
share|improve this answer

== has higher precedence than =, so it compares the result of fopen() to NULL, then assigns that to fd.

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== has a higher priority than =.

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Have you done the following?

#include <stdio.h>

Without this, the compiler assumes all functions return an int.

share|improve this answer
    
mark downs with no comments? Bad form ppl. Help me to learn from my error. Also note - it was a question, not an assertion. – Dan Kendall Jan 22 '10 at 15:02

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