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I read somewhere that if you have multiple strings in your application that are the same, that there is really only ever one created and all references really point to the same string.

I see warnings about this behavior when reading about locks. Like never lock on string because any other lock anywhere in the application could potentially lock on the same string. Especially if you locked on :

string lockObj = "";
...
{
  lock(lockObj){
  ...
  }
}

So this brings me back to there only ever being a single copy of a specific string. So if I wanted to compare two strings, is there any way to do it by their memory location? Like..

public bool areSame(string s1,string s2){
   return &s1 == &s2;
}

Thanks for the help!

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But why would you want to do such a thing? What use could it possibly be to you to know whether two string references referred to the same object or different objects with the same contents?<br><br>You can call the Object.ReferenceEquals method to test for referential equality but I can't see how that could ever be useful for strings. –  jmcilhinney Jan 17 '14 at 4:00
    
@jmcilhinney OP is asking "can you compare". –  Jim Jan 17 '14 at 4:02
    
@Jim, and the answer is "who cares because it would be useless to do so anyway". –  jmcilhinney Jan 17 '14 at 4:03
    
@jmcilhinney Have you never asked a question just to find out if it's possible? You never know what kind of insights it could lead to. –  itsme86 Jan 17 '14 at 4:09
    
Side note: string comparison checks pointer equality first internally already. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 17 '14 at 4:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I read somewhere that if you have multiple strings in your application that are the same, that there is really only ever one created and all references really point to the same string.

That is incorrect. Although you can arrange your program in such a way that it used a single object per unique string, .NET does not make such guarantee. It is true that C# compiler will make all string objects produced from string literals in your program point to the same string object. However, it is rather easy to create multiple string objects with identical content.

if I wanted to compare two strings, is there any way to do it by their memory location?

You can use Object.ReferenceEquals method for that:

public bool areSame(string s1,string s2){
   return Object.ReferenceEquals(s1, s2);
}
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1  
+1. The method to share strings called "interning" in .Net and implemented by String.Intern, but there are significant side effects of its usage so don't try it at home unless you found multiple strings to be a problem (i.e. check string interning question. Manual interning with Dictionary may be better first step. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 17 '14 at 4:15

You could use the Object.ReferenceEquals Method

According to MSDN: Determines whether the specified Object instances are the same instance.

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var x = "a";
x+= "b";
var y = "ab";
Console.WriteLine(x==y);
Console.WriteLine(object.ReferenceEquals(x, y));

You'll see that the second one returns false (i.e. they are in 2 different memory locations)

Why did I need to assign x the way I did? Well because .net automatically interns all string literals.. Which means all identical string literals actually do point to the same location in memory

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All identical string literals in a given assembly are interned by default. Strings are not guaranteed to be interned across assembly boundaries. –  Eric Lippert Jan 17 '14 at 6:23

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