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I have an issue when i compare folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode() and map.get("infoCode") below code .Both give value=2 But my issue is that its not enter inside if condition.

Here's example :

if (folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode().equals(map.get("infoCode"))) {
         showNotification(pageResourceBundle.getText("MSG_SAME_INFO_ALREADY_EXISTS"));
          return;
    }

Before i googled its not effective for me:Comparing Integer objects vs int

Can anyone tell mehow can resolve this issue ?

Thanks

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what is the return type of getInfoCode() –  Abubakkar Rangara Jan 17 '14 at 5:39
    
it return Integer –  Sitansu Jan 17 '14 at 5:40
    
@Sitansu Integer or int? As it turns out, that can make a difference. –  Dennis Meng Jan 17 '14 at 5:42
    
What type, exactly does folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode() return, and how, exactly was the map declared? –  Brian Roach Jan 17 '14 at 5:49
    
Map<String, Object> map –  Sitansu Jan 17 '14 at 5:50

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the comments you state that the map was declared Map<String, Object>. That's probably the problem.

When you call map.get("infoCode") you're getting back an Object.

If:

  • that Object is actually an instance of Integer
  • folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode() is returning an Integer
  • both Integers contain the same value

Then this:

if (folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode()
        .equals(map.get("infoCode"))) {

Would evaluate to true.

So either they are two Integers but don't both contain the same value, or they are different types of objects and are not equal. (Or, "infoCode" doesn't exist in the map and it's returning null)

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If you want to use .equals(), the best way is by make sure it always return Integer instead of int

int num1 = Integer.parseInt(folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode());
int num2 = Integer.parseInt(map.get("infoCode"));

if (new Integer(num1).equals(new Integer(num2))) {
     showNotification(pageResourceBundle.getText("MSG_SAME_INFO_ALREADY_EXISTS"));
      return;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Integer num2 = new Integer(map.get("infoCode"));The constructor Integer(Object) is undefined –  Sitansu Jan 17 '14 at 5:52
1  
@Sitansu if you get The constructor Integer(Object) is undefined thats means map.get("infoCode") value is already an Integer type –  DnR Jan 17 '14 at 5:58
    
@DnR No, it means his Map is declared Map<String, Object> (see the comments). There is no constructor (or parseInt()) for Integer that takes an Object –  Brian Roach Jan 17 '14 at 6:06
    
@BrianRoach yes, and thats why he got the error, because Integer constructor only allow either int or string –  DnR Jan 17 '14 at 6:09
    
@DnR Right ... but ... read your comment, that's not what you said :-D If it were an Integer type already, it would unbox to an int and work. –  Brian Roach Jan 17 '14 at 6:11

You have to check whether both are Integer instances having the correct value so, that is passes equality test. The test will definitely get pass when both Integer values are same. Please debug your code and find out. There is no use in changing it to ==.

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my infocode more than 1000 in case its not working –  Sitansu Jan 17 '14 at 5:41
    
Why wouldn't .equals not work and == work? You should explain that, more so since the default implementation of .equals does a reference (==) comparison. Did you intend to say that .equals() overriden implementation in object returned by getInfoCode() is wrong? –  Scorpion Jan 17 '14 at 5:41
1  
If it's compiling, this is incorrect. A Map can't return a primitive, so aside from causing some un-needed unboxing, it won't make any difference. –  Brian Roach Jan 17 '14 at 5:42
    
Since these are int values, equality operator should be used. Since they are actual values passed in both sides.Why we shouldn't do it? –  Keerthivasan Jan 17 '14 at 5:46
1  
Oh, i am so sorry. I did presume and answered it wrongly. thanks –  Keerthivasan Jan 17 '14 at 5:53

if it return String

if (Integer.parseInt(folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode()) == Integer.parseInt(map.get("infoCode"))) {
         showNotification(pageResourceBundle.getText("MSG_SAME_INFO_ALREADY_EXISTS"));
          return;
    }

else

if (folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode() == map.get("infoCode")) {
         showNotification(pageResourceBundle.getText("MSG_SAME_INFO_ALREADY_EXISTS"));
          return;
    }

try this is also

 if (folderInfoData.getFolderInfoRecord().getInfoCode().toString.trim().equals(map.get("infoCode").toString().trim())) {
         showNotification(pageResourceBundle.getText("MSG_SAME_INFO_ALREADY_EXISTS"));
          return;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The method parseInt(String) in the type Integer is not applicable for the arguments (Object) –  Sitansu Jan 17 '14 at 5:47

Seems that you are comparing int with an Integer. Java will convert an Integer into an int automatically

So

int a = 2;
Integer b = a;
System.out.println(a == b);

becomes

int a = 2;
Integer b = new Integer(a);
System.out.println(a == b.valueOf());

So if you want to use equals, See Rafa El answer. else you can use ==.

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