Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I think the title is right but please correct me if It is mis-leading.

The problem: I have a class which wants to use the DB class, now instead of having to "global $db;" in every method I wish to use the DB object I want to be able to place the object reference in my class properties.

Still following? OK here goes:

class user
{
    private $id = 0;
    private $name = NULL;
    private $password = NULL;
    private $db;

    function __construct()
    {
        $this->load_db();
    }

    private function load_db()
    {
        global $db;
        $this->$db =& $db;
    }

I get an error "Object of class db could not be converted to string" which is annoying as I can't figure out how to set the var type in PHP...

Now my question is two fold:

1) How do I fix this. or 2) Is there a better way of doing it as this feels really "kack-handed".

Thanks in advance,

Dorjan

edit: Just to make sure I'm clear I do not want to make multiple instances of the same DB object. At least I believe this to be a good practice ^,^

share|improve this question
    
At which line do you get that error? –  mck89 Jan 22 '10 at 15:46
    
I feel so embarrassed. Thanks guys! –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 15:48
2  
Instead of using global $db altogether you might be interested in en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dependency_injection Can be as simple as public function setDb(PDO $dbObject) { $this->db = db; } –  VolkerK Jan 22 '10 at 15:49
    
AS many of you have given this advice I'll quickly try that. –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 15:50
    
Perfect! Now it looks very clean and avoiding the global :D You guys always make my code that much better! –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 15:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're using $this, you only need one dollar sign. So $this->db.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the correct answer for 1), but the other answers on dependency injection are good advice for 2). –  Skilldrick Jan 22 '10 at 15:52
    
Agreed! Thanks for answering my main question! –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 15:55

This:

$this->db
share|improve this answer
private function load_db()
{
        global $db;
        $this->db =& $db;
}

Also if you are using php 5 you dont need to use the =& operator because objects are implicitly passed by reference. Secondly, you should inject $db into the constructor or fetch it from a Registry object instead of using global.

share|improve this answer
    
oh really? = no longer creates a copy but rather points to the original? –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 15:52
    
uk.php.net/manual/en/language.references.whatdo.php you're right! –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 16:27
    
Actually: Since PHP 5, new returns a reference automatically, so using =& in this context is deprecated and produces an E_STRICT message. This is on functions and methods not on assigning var's which still need the & to do this... I'm still unsure if what you say is indeed true as I can't find the officially documentation saying that Objects are implicitly passed by reference. I'd love to just trust you but I want to make sure :) –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 16:41

Inject the db instance through the constructor

public function __construct($db)
{
    $this->db = $db;
}
share|improve this answer

Yopu'll want to use something called dependency injection. This is where you "inject" an object into another object to do whatever it is the object does. In this case do database stuff

class user { private $id = 0; private $name = NULL; private $password = NULL; private $db;

function __construct($database_object)
{
    $this->load_db();
    $this->$db = $database_object;
}

public function do_db_stuff()
{
    $this->$db->doStuff();
}    

$db = new Mysql() 
$user = new User($db);
$user->do_db_stuff();
share|improve this answer

You should better do

class User
{
    private $id = 0;
    private $name = NULL;
    private $password = NULL;
    private $db;

    function __construct($db=null)
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

}

Note that you don't put a $ before variable names if you access properties via $object->. That is were the error comes from.

To use a global inside a class method is really bad practice as you somehow tie your class to that global variable. Better pass it as a parameter to the constructor or a method.

Later you can instantiate the class with

$user = new User($db)

Also note that class names by convention start with a capital letter.

share|improve this answer
    
:) Very clear makes my code that much better, thank you Felix. –  Dorjan Jan 22 '10 at 15:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.