Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have got:

class A
{
   virtual void get();
}

class B: public A
{
   void get();
}

class C: public B
{
   void get();
}

and

int main()
{
   B     *i;

   i = new C();
   i.get();
   return (0);
}

if A::get() is virtual:

i.get() calls C::get()

if A::get() is not virtual:

i.get() calls B::get()

My question is:

Why do I not need to put virtual on B::get() to use C::get() with B.get()?

share|improve this question
3  
That's not real code. virtual get(); –  jrok Jan 17 at 11:43
    
It should be something like virtual int get() or something like that. –  Gautham Jan 17 at 11:44
    
Yea sorry, edited :) –  nsvir Jan 17 at 11:52
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Methods that override virtual methods from the base class will be implicitly virtual, too - that holds for the entire ihneritance chain.

struct A {
    virtual int f(int);
};

struct B : A {
    int f(int); // overrides A::f, implicitly virtual
    void g(float);
};

struct C : B {
    int f(int); // overrides B::f, implicitly virtual
    int f(char);  // doesn't override anything, not virtual
    void g(float); // doesn't override and isn't virtual,
                   // because B::g is not virtual either.
                   // It hides B::g instead.
};
share|improve this answer
    
The right way should be to explicitly put virtual in B and C then ? –  nsvir Jan 17 at 11:57
1  
@nsvir - it's good practice to mark them as virtual, too. C++11 also has the override keyword (en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/override), which is a better way to mark the methods, if your compiler supports it. –  Sean Jan 17 at 12:00
    
Ok! Thanks a lot :) –  nsvir Jan 17 at 12:02
add comment

When a member function is declared virtual in a base class, it will be virtual for all child classes as well. The fact that you can omit the virtual keyword in the child classes does not imply it is not virtual.

Your assumption on the code you proposed, that follows:

int main()
{
   B* i;
   i = new C();
   i.get();
   return (0);
}

are misguided by the fact that the above code won't even compile (even if you added the semicolons at the end of each class declaration/definition).

When you are dealing with pointers and you want to call a member function you can either dereference the pointer and use the . operator:

(*ptr).function();

or use the -> operator:

ptr->function();

Your code does neither of them. But assuming what you actually meant was:

int main()
{
   B* i = new C();
   i->get();
}

you assumptions turns out to be right:

  • if A::get is virtual, in i->get, C::get will be called
  • otherwise B::get will be called.

Why do I not need to put virtual on B::get() to use C::get() with B.get()?

You don't. The void get() member function is virtual from the base class, all the way to the C class. You don't need to repeat the virtual keywords, but I'd actually recommend it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.