Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a funcA which I call every msec. by another funcB. I want to use goto statement. But when I look at the flow (when m_tempdata is not NULL), after printing "stage 2", it is also printing "cleanup starts". Normally, I expect to return after printing "stage 2" for the next turn. Am I wrong?

void ClassA::funcA()
{
    m_tempdata = m_freedata;

    printf("stage 1 \n");

    if (NULL == m_tempdata)
    {
        printf("going cleaning \n" );
        goto cleanup;
    }
    m_freedata = m_tempdata->next;

    printf("stage 2 \n");

cleanup: printf("cleanup starts \n");
    // ... some additional work todo
}
share|improve this question
1  
Why would you expect it to return? cleanup: is just a label between your statements. Also, there's no good reason to justify goto here :v –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun Jan 17 '14 at 15:15
    
You reap what you sow –  David Heffernan Jan 17 '14 at 15:17
1  
This should be fun... –  John Dibling Jan 17 '14 at 15:30

5 Answers 5

Normally, I expect to return after printing "stage 2" for the next turn. Am I wrong?

Yes, you're wrong.

In the case where the label wasn't jumped to, the code will simply fall through to it and continue. A label isn't an instruction. It doesn't cause the program to magically return or jump somewhere else.

Here is a much better way to write this:

void ClassA::funcA()
{
  m_tempdata = m_freedata;

  printf("stage 1 \n");

  if (NULL == m_tempdata)
  {
    printf("going cleaning \n" );
    Cleanup();
    return;
  }

  m_freedata = m_tempdata->next;
}

void ClassA::Cleanup()
{
  printf("cleanup starts \n");
  //      ... some additional work todo
}

Please don't use goto. It make the code much more difficult to understand, debug and maintain. Plus you end up making silly mistakes like you did here because you made poor design decisions earlier. Use modern flow-control constructs instead.

share|improve this answer

You don't seem to have a good/compelling reason to use goto in this code, so don't. Use more readable control flow structures.

printf("stage 1\n");
if (NULL != m_tempdata)
{
    printf("stage 2\n");
    // ...
}
else
{
    printf("cleanup starts\n");
    // ...
}

If you need to do the cleanup regardless of whether "stage 2" runs or not, remove the else block and have the cleanup code at the end.

share|improve this answer

Why should it stop? There's nothing to interrupt control flow between the statement printf("stage 2 \n"); and the statement printf("cleanup starts \n"); (which happens to be labelled cleanup:).

If you really want it to interrupt, you'll have to insert a return statement before the cleanup: label.

But please, seriously reconsider using goto. It makes programs very difficult to reason about - always prefer structured flow (ifs, loops, function calls).

share|improve this answer

There's nothing to tell the compiler that the function should exit after "stage 2". If you want it to return you have to actually tell the compiler that by adding a return statement.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, since cleanup is called by goto statement, I was thinking it is only executed when goto is called. Is it possible to let it work without return? –  Avb Avb Jan 17 '14 at 15:17
    
@AvbAvb You can still use return with no expression: return;. It will return from the function (with or without a return value) at the point of the return statement. –  Joachim Pileborg Jan 17 '14 at 15:21

I suspect you are trying to use a vintage C programming pattern like this one:

void do_hot_stuff (void)
{
    void * data1 = malloc (123);
    if (data1 == NULL) goto fail1;

    void * data2 = malloc (123);
    if (data2 == NULL) goto fail2;

    void * data3 = malloc (123);
    if (data3 == NULL) goto fail3;

    // do your hot stuff here

    free (data3);
    fail3:
    free(data2);
    fail2:
    free(data1);
    fail1:
}

Frankly I did not use this since I last wrote code for my Amiga back in the late 80's.
Just don't.

share|improve this answer
    
I think you mixed up the labels and the statements at the end :) You can probably still find this kind of stuff in libraries, such as OpenSSL, but I sure hope that people don't continue to write such code. A few years ago, I saw some production code where most functions contained a giant while loop which wrapped the "hot stuff" in order to catch exceptional cases. Nasty stuff, but still better than goto :) –  Mihai Todor Jan 17 '14 at 15:37
1  
@MihaiTodor Mmmm... I think the statement placement is OK (if you fail to allocate data3, you just have to free data2 & data1), but anyway this stuff is good for museums. –  kuroi neko Jan 17 '14 at 15:47
    
Ah, right :)) Another good example to never use such things :) –  Mihai Todor Jan 17 '14 at 15:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.