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I have a question about sub-prototyping.

As example I want to do something like:

var Foo = function() { this.Bar.prototype.Foo = this.Baz.prototype.Foo = this };
Foo.prototype.is = "foo";
Foo.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.is };

Foo.prototype.Bar = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.is = "bar";
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.Foo.is + this.is };

Foo.prototype.Baz = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.is = "baz";
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.Foo.is + this.is };

var foo = new Foo();
var bar = new foo.Bar();
var baz = new foo.Baz();

console.log(foo.Iam()); // output: foo
console.log(bar.Iam()); // output: foobar
console.log(baz.Iam()); // output: foobaz

To access the Foo-object within Bar and Baz I extend the prototype of Bar and Baz with this.Bar.prototype.Foo = this.Baz.prototype.Foo = this.

My question is if there exists an easier way to do that and to access the main object Foo within Bar and Baz, or is this the common way to do that? The reason I want to do that is to create one main object var x = new Foo() and all sub objects can access the main object.

share|improve this question
    
your current method seems pretty decent - about 1 statement per class brings it into the mix. –  goat Jan 17 '14 at 16:43
4  
Is this "sub prototyping" an actual pattern that is in fact used by some people? –  basilikum Jan 17 '14 at 16:45
1  
I don't see any reason to prototype Bar or Baz which are the function-constructor. I wrote down my variant to include Bar and Baz in Foo –  Andrew Jan 17 '14 at 21:32

4 Answers 4

I haven't seen sub-prototyping using much. I found only this way:

var Foo = function() {};
Foo.prototype.is = "foo";
Foo.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.is };

Foo.prototype.Bar = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.foo = new Foo();
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.is = "bar";
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.foo.is + this.is };

Foo.prototype.Baz = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.foo = new Foo();
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.is = "baz";
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.foo.is + this.is };

var foo = new Foo();
var bar = new foo.Bar();
var baz = new foo.Baz();

console.log(foo.Iam()); // output: foo
console.log(bar.Iam()); // output: foobar
console.log(baz.Iam()); // output: foobaz
share|improve this answer
Foo.prototype.Bar = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.foo = new Foo();

yes, this is exactly what I found most times, but if I go this way then changes to Foo() are lost.

In my example above I am able to set "global" parameters to Foo() that are accessable from Bar() and Baz(). Example:

var extend = function(a, b) {
    var n;
    for (n in b) {
        a[n] = b[n];
    }
};

var Foo = function(o) {
    extend(this, o);
    this.Bar.prototype.Foo = this.Baz.prototype.Foo = this;
};

Foo.prototype.is = "foo";
Foo.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.is };
Foo.prototype.greeting = "hello, I am";

Foo.prototype.Bar = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.is = "bar";
Foo.prototype.Bar.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.Foo.greeting +" "+ this.Foo.is + this.is };

Foo.prototype.Baz = function() {};
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.is = "baz";
Foo.prototype.Baz.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.Foo.is + this.is };

var foo = new Foo({ greeting: "hi my friend, I am" });
var bar = new foo.Bar();
console.log(bar.Iam());

//output is: hi my friend, I am foobar

I set the greeting to Foo() that is accessable from all sub functions. The reason to go this was is that there exists different "global" parameters of an object. If a "global" parameter is changed on Foo(), then it should affect Bar() and Baz().

I don't really know if this is the right way to go, because I just started to learn Javascript. I am open to new ideas.

Regards, Jonny

share|improve this answer

Maybe here is what you are looking for:

var extend = function(a, b) {
    var n;
    for (n in b) {
        a[n] = b[n];
    }
};

var Foo = function(o) {
    extend(this, o);
    var foo = this;

    this.Bar = function() {};
    this.Bar.prototype.is = "bar";
    this.Bar.prototype.Iam = function() { return foo.is + this.is };

    this.Baz = function() {};
    this.Baz.prototype.is = "baz";
    this.Baz.prototype.Iam = function() { return foo.is + this.is };
};
Foo.prototype.is = "foo";
Foo.prototype.Iam = function() { return this.is };

var foo = new Foo({ is: "foo2" });
var bar = new foo.Bar();
var baz = new foo.Baz();

console.log(foo.Iam()); // output: foo2
console.log(bar.Iam()); // output: foo2bar
console.log(baz.Iam()); // output: foo2baz
share|improve this answer

There is only one instance of Foo so you can declare foo as an object literal:

var foo = {
  is:"foo",
  Iam:function(){return this.is}
};

foo.Bar = function() {};
foo.Bar.prototype.is = "bar";

foo.Baz = function() {};
foo.Baz.prototype.is = "baz";

foo.Bar.prototype.Iam = foo.Baz.prototype.Iam 
  = function() { return foo.is + this.is };

var bar = new foo.Bar();
var baz = new foo.Baz();

console.log(foo.Iam()); // output: foo
console.log(bar.Iam()); // output: foobar
console.log(baz.Iam()); // output: foobaz
share|improve this answer

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