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This is the query I'm performing (without some Joins that are not relevant):

SELECT a.*, c.id
FROM a
LEFT OUTER JOIN b ON a.id = b.id_anunciante
LEFT OUTER JOIN c ON c.id = b.id_rubro
GROUP BY a.id

Each row of "a" is linked with 1 to 5 rows in "b".

The problem is that GROUP BY has performance issues (it takes 10x or more using GROUP BY than not using it). I need to retrieve only one row of each member in "a".

How can I make this faster?

edit: I need to be able to filter by a.id AND/OR c.id. The resultset I should be getting is only 1 row per "valid" member of "a", meaning the rows that match the constraints. Rows that don't match the filters shouldn't be returned. In my original query, this would be done this way:

SELECT a.*, c.id
FROM a
LEFT OUTER JOIN b ON a.id = b.id_anunciante
LEFT OUTER JOIN c ON c.id = b.id_rubro
WHERE c.id = 1
OR a.id = 1
GROUP BY a.id

a.id, b.id_anunciante, b.id_rubro, c.id are all indexes.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT  a.*,
        (
        SELECT  c.id
        FROM    b
        JOIN    с
        ON      c.id = b.id_rubro
        WHERE   b.id_anunciante = a.id
        -- add the ORDER BY condition to define which row will be selected.
        LIMIT 1
        )
FROM    a

Create the index on b (id_anunciante) for this to work faster.

Update:

You don't need the OUTER JOINs here.

Rewrite your query as this:

SELECT  a.*, c.id
FROM    a
JOIN    b
ON      b.id_anunciante = a.id
JOIN    c
ON      c.id = b.id_rubro
WHERE   a.id = 1
UNION ALL
SELECT  a.*, 1
FROM    a
WHERE   EXISTS
        (
        SELECT  NULL
        FROM    c
        JOIN    b
        ON      b.id_rubro = c.id
        WHERE   c.id = 1
                AND b.id_anunciante = a.id
        )
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Thanks for your answer! What if I needed to filter by c.id AND/OR a.id? I can't do that this way, can I? –  Gerardo Jan 23 '10 at 18:58
    
@macaco: sure you can. Just add a WHERE condition to the outer query to filter on a, and to the subquery to filter on c. –  Quassnoi Jan 23 '10 at 20:56
    
I tried filtering by c.id in the subquery "WHERE b.id_anunciante = a.id AND c.id = 1", but I got the same amount of rows and the ones that shouldn't be there with the subquery column filled with NULL. –  Gerardo Jan 25 '10 at 23:00
    
@macaco: yes, this is how it is supposed to behave. The point of LEFT JOINs (used in your original query) is that a NULL is returned for the missing rows. If this is not what you expected, could you please update your question with the sample data and the resultset you'd like to get? –  Quassnoi Jan 25 '10 at 23:22
    
I shouldn't be getting the rows with NULL in the subquery. I have updated the question. Many thanks again! –  Gerardo Jan 25 '10 at 23:33

Add ORDER BY NULL to avoid the implicit sorting MySQL does when doing a group by.

I suppose you have indexes/PKs on a.id, b.id_anunciante, b.id_rubro and c.id ? I guess you could try adding a composite index on (b.id_anunciante, b.id_rubro) if your mysql version is not able to do an index merge.

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