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Given the following code written in C:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>

typedef struct {
    int var;
    int **m;
} STRUCTURE;

int main() {
    STRUCTURE a;
    int i, j;

    a.var = 5;

    a.m = malloc(a.var * sizeof(int *));
    for(i = 0; i < a.var; i++) {
        a.m[i] = calloc(a.var, sizeof(int));
    }

    for(i = 0; i < a.var; i++) {
        a.m[i][i] = 1;
    }

    for(i = 0; i < a.var; i++) {
        for(j = 0; j < a.var; j++) {
            printf("%d ", a.m[i][j]);   
        }
        printf("\n");
    }

    return 0;
}

Which will simply output:

1 0 0 0 0 
0 1 0 0 0 
0 0 1 0 0 
0 0 0 1 0 
0 0 0 0 1 

Given the fact that the structure was declared in main, but pointers from it were allocated dynamically, how should they be freed? If they should.

Thank you!

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1  
They should be, using free... Hint: it's similar to how you malloced them. –  Kninnug Jan 17 at 20:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Anything you malloced must be freed as well. An exception would be when exiting, as usually the OS will claim the memory anyway (depends on the OS). Still it would be considered bad practice, even though it technically wouldn't be a memory leak.

The free should be done in the reverse order to what you usedin to allocate.

for(i = 0; i < a.var; i++) {
    free(a.m[i]);
free(a.m);

Reason is, that you can not free the main body before you freed the pointers inside it, as they are not accessible anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
What if I declare my structure in main and send the address of it into a void function(STRUCTURE *a) and I allocate my matrix in that function. Can I free my matrix the way you said from 'main' or I have to free it from the function? –  Dragos Rizescu Jan 17 at 20:54
1  
You can free it anywhere you like. However, you shoiuld be aware of the scope. If you pass a pointer to a function which will free it, the caller still has the pointer, but it is no longer valid of course. There is a restriction though, that you use the same method to free memory as you used to allocate. So if you mix C and C++ code you should not use new and later free instead using delete and of course the same applies in the other way. –  Devolus Jan 17 at 20:55
1  
Kerrisk devotes an entire (small) section to asking "To free or not to free?" (as what you point out, automatic freeing after exit(), holds). He concludes essentially "meh". As, at least for Linux, he's somewhat authorative, and people will hold religious beliefs about the need to free, just an FYI - thought it might interest you. :) –  gnometorule Jan 17 at 20:57
1  
That's exactly what he discusses (daemons and such), agreed. You just frequently see it as an absolute no matter what. I free everything I use; it was really just am fyi. –  gnometorule Jan 17 at 21:02
1  
@gnometorule, I have similar doubts about the need to always check the returned pointer being NULL. For a proper "out of memory" handling in a complex program, this is way to naive but everybody preaches it as if it were the scripture. –  Devolus Jan 17 at 21:05

free() just works the same way as malloc, though you normally want it in the opposite order. You should use something like something like:

for(i = 0; i < a.var; i++) {
    free (a.m[i]);
}
free (a.m);
share|improve this answer
    
Never knew that. Do you have a reference for that? –  Jori Jan 17 at 20:50
2  
I don't think you need a reference! The pointer to the heap allocated object was put in a.m[i] so that's what you need to free(). Obviously you need to free(a.m) after, else you would be dereferencing a pointer to freed memory when you free (a.m[i]) –  abligh Jan 17 at 20:53
    
Thank you very much for your answer! :) –  Dragos Rizescu Jan 17 at 20:57
    
@abligh Oh yes of course, I didn't read very good, thought you were talking more in general, but in this example you are right. I mean if you saved a pointer to one of the array elements the order doesn't make a difference, thus you can free an array of pointers without free'ing individual elements. I'm sorry for the weird confusion ^^ –  Jori Jan 19 at 11:42

In reverse

for(i = 0; i < a.var; i++) {
    free(a.m[i]);
}
free(a.m);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for answering! :) –  Dragos Rizescu Jan 17 at 20:57

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