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I have been reading about Qt signals and slots and I am trying to get this to work, but until now without success. I hope someone can point me in the right direction.
I have two files, homeCommand.cpp and messagelogcommand.cpp. I have a QPlainTextEdit object in messagelogcommand.cpp that I want to update from homeCommand.cpp.
How can I do this using signals and slots? My signal is being called, as my QDebug is being printed out once a second, however the widget does not update.

This is what I am trying to do:

In MessageLogCommand.h

class MessageLogCommand : public QWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT
public:
    explicit MessageLogCommand(QWidget *parent = 0);

    QLabel *homeLabel;
    QPlainTextEdit *messageLog;

public Q_SLOTS:
    void updateWidgets(const QString &text);

};

homeCommand.h

class homeCommand : public QWidget
{
    Q_OBJECT

Q_SIGNALS:
    void textChanged(const QString &text);

public:
    explicit homeCommand(QWidget *parent = 0);

public slots:
    void run(void);
    void getHealthStatusPacket(void);

homeCommand.cpp

homeCommand::homeCommand(QWidget *parent) : QWidget(parent)
{
    ...
    //Timer
    QTimer *timer = new QTimer(this);
    timer->setSingleShot(false);
    connect(timer, SIGNAL(timeout()), this, SLOT(run()));
    timer->start(1000);

    setLayout(layout);
}

void homeCommand::run(void)
{
    getHealthStatusPacket();
}

void homeCommand::getHealthStatusPacket(void)
{
    ...
    Q_EMIT textChanged("ZOMG");
}

In MessageLogCommand.cpp

 MessageLogCommand::MessageLogCommand(QWidget *parent) : QWidget(parent)
 {

    QGridLayout *layout = new QGridLayout;
    QWidget::setFixedHeight(600);

    //Sub-system Label
    homeLabel = new QLabel("GSS Message Log");
    QFont subsystemFont = homeLabel->font();
    subsystemFont.setPointSize(12);
    subsystemFont.setBold(true);
    homeLabel->setFont(subsystemFont);
    layout->addWidget(homeLabel, 0, 0);

    //Event Log
    messageLog = new QPlainTextEdit();
    messageLog->setFixedHeight(500);
    messageLog->setFixedWidth(600);
    layout->addWidget(messageLog, 2,0);

    setLayout(layout);
}

void MessageLogCommand::updateWidgets(const QString &text)
{
    qDebug() << "Here";
    messageLog->appendPlainText(text);
}

In main.cpp

MessageLogCommand s;
homeCommand m;

QObject::connect(&m, SIGNAL(textChanged(QString)), &s, SLOT(updateWidgets(QString)));
share|improve this question
    
I think for anyone to be of help, you need to provide what code you have in a code block –  sethcall Jan 17 at 21:35
    
Show us more. Maybe there's no need to use signals&slots –  prajmus Jan 17 at 21:38

3 Answers 3

A very good starting point for signals and slots is: http://woboq.com/blog/how-qt-signals-slots-work.html but also the official Qt doc does it: http://qt-project.org/doc/qt-4.8/signalsandslots.html

Basically what happens: you declare some special methods (signals and slots), at the compilation phase Qt generates extra CPP files which take care of your methods (moc) then everything is compiled and linked together and at the end when Qt or someone else emits a signal it will go to the corresponding slot.

share|improve this answer
    
I have read this documentation and still not not fully understand, I updated my original post with what I am attempting to do... –  user2494298 Jan 17 at 21:48

A very basic example is:

class MainClass:public QObject    //class must be derived from QObject!
{
   Q_OBJECT    //this macro must be in the class definition
               //so the moc compiler can generate the necessary glue code

   public:
       void doSomething() {
           ...
           Q_EMIT textChanged(someText);
       }

   Q_SIGNALS:
       void textChanged(const QString &text);
};

class SubClass:public QObject
{
   Q_OBJECT

   public Q_SLOTS:
       void onTextChanged(const QString &text) {    //do not inline
           //do something
       }
};

int main()
{
    QApplication a;

    MainClass m;
    SubClass s;
    QObject::connect(&m, SIGNAL(textChanged(QString)),
                     &s, SLOT(onTextChanged(QString)));  //const and & are removed from
                                                         //the arguments

    return a.exec();    //run the event loop
}

So, there are 2 things important: 1. Signals and slots must be declared in a class derived from QObject 2. The classes containing signals and slots declarations must add the Q_OBJECT macro to the class declaration

To keep it simple for you: always declare your classes containing signals or slots in a header file (never in a .cpp file).

share|improve this answer
    
I tried this. It compiles, and I know the "onTextChanged" function is being called because I have a qDebug() message print out everytime it is called. For some reason my widget doesn't update though. It just stays blank. I even tried to just put a hardcoded string in and it never shows up. Idea's why this could be? –  user2494298 Jan 20 at 16:06
    
Could you give us more insight into your code, including class declarations? –  Kurt Pattyn Jan 20 at 16:52
    
Sure, I will update my main post with exactly what I have. –  user2494298 Jan 20 at 17:02
    
Alright I updated my original post with my new code. –  user2494298 Jan 20 at 17:15

I try to explain it.

In main.h you should to declare a signal:

signals:
     void textChanged(const QString& text);

And in messagelog.h you should to declare a slot:

public slots:
     void updateWidgets(const QString& text);

In main.cpp you should emit this signal:

void TheMethod() {
    emit this->textChanged("Your text/value");
}

In messagelog.cpp you should get this value:

// Note: Normalized signal/slot signatures drop the consts and references.
connect(&a, SIGNAL(textChanged(QString)), this, SLOT(updateWidgets(QString)));

void updateWidgets(const QString& text) {
   messageLog = new QPlainTextEdit();
   messageLog->setFixedHeight(500);
   messageLog->setFixedWidth(600);
   messageLog->setPlainText(text)
   layout->addWidget(messageLog, 2,0);
}

I think it should works.

UPDATE: Complete example: https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/29647980/test.zip

share|improve this answer
    
Why do you use pointers? –  leemes Jan 17 at 21:54
    
I am not sure if it right. It's quite a while ago since I have programmed for the last time in C++ an Qt. –  sharbag Jan 17 at 21:59
    
Don't I need to call connect()??? –  user2494298 Jan 17 at 22:07
    
Yes. You should do it for example in constructor. –  sharbag Jan 17 at 22:08
    
The code complies and runs, but my updateWidgets() is never being triggered. I put a printf() statement in and nothing ever gets printed out. –  user2494298 Jan 17 at 22:40

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