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This question already has an answer here:

I'm using Parallel.ForEach for a large set of jobs.

I want to know how does the process go.

So currently I wrote:

int processCnt=0;
Parallel.ForEach(allJobs, myPallOption, (oneJob) =>
    {
      processCnt++;
      Console.WriteLine("Job#"+processCnt+"/"+totalCnt);
      doJob(oneJob);
    }

But I think processCnt++; will be locked somehow and this may not be a good idea. This could slow down the process.

So is there any better way to know how many jobs are already completed?

I don't really care about the accuracy of the processCnt, I just want a higher speed. I think processCnt++ may have slower performance.

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marked as duplicate by MarcinJuraszek, L.B, McGarnagle, Markus, Donal Fellows Jan 18 '14 at 15:24

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

How about doing:

int processCnt=0;
Parallel.ForEach(allJobs, myPallOption, (oneJob) =>
    {
      var currentCount = Interlocked.Increment(ref processCnt);
      Console.WriteLine("Job#"+currentCount+"/"+totalCnt);
      doJob(oneJob);
    }

By having a local variable 'currentCount' you are sure that 'processCnt' will not be changed between your local increment and writing it to console.

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Replace processCnt++; with Interlocked.Increment(ref processCnt);

You don't need to assign the result to another variable because of using [ref].

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To specifically adress your question: the ++ operator is not designed to be threadsafe, so there is no extra cost. It will produce wrong results though. Interlocked.Increment (as suggested in the other answers) is better, it is correct, and if it is still not very expensive. Way cheaper than an actual lock.

Interlocked.Increment is cheap because it can be implemented using a special CPU instruction that freezes all other cores for the time of that instruction.

share|improve this answer
    
Will the downvoter explain what I said wrong? – user180326 Jan 17 '14 at 23:17

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