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I'm writing a text-to-speech program that reads math equations. I have a thread that needs to pull math equations (as MathJax SVG's) and parse them to prose.

Because of how the content is laid out, the math equations can be arbitrarily nested in other elements, like paragraphs, bolds, tables, etc.

Using a reference to the current element, how do I get the next <span class="MathJax_SVG">, which may be embedded in some other parent/ancestor?

I tried to solve it using the following:

nextMath = currentElement.xpath('following::.//span[@class=\'MathJax_SVG\']')

Returns nothing, even though I can confirm visually that there is something following it. I tried removing the period, but lxml complains that my XPath is malformed.

Have you guys ran into this before?

P.S. Here is a test document to show my point:

<html>
   <head>
      <title>Test Document</title>
   </head>
   <body>
      <h1 id="mainHeading">The Quadratic Formula</h1>
      <p>The quadratic formula is used to solve quadratic equations. Here is the formula:</p>
      <p><span class="MathJax_SVG" id="MathJax_Element_Frame_1">removed the SVG</span></p>
      <p>Here are some possible values when you use the formula:</p>
      <p>
      <table>
         <tr>
            <td><span class="MathJax_SVG" id="MathJax_Element_Frame_2">removed the SVG</span></td>
            <td><span class="MathJax_SVG" id="MathJax_Element_Frame_3">removed the SVG</span></td>
         </tr>
         <tr>
            <td><span class="MathJax_SVG" id="MathJax_Element_Frame_4">removed the SVG</span></td>
            <td><span class="MathJax_SVG" id="MathJax_Element_Frame_5">removed the SVG</span></td>
         </tr>
      </table>
      </p>
   </body>
</html>

Updates

Learned that lxml doesn't support absolute positions. This may be relevant.

Some Testing Code (assuming you saved HTML as test.html)

from lxml import html

# Get my html element
with open('test.html', 'r') as f:
    myHtml = html.fromstring(f.read())

# Get the first MathJax element
start = myHtml.find('.//h1[@id=\'mainHeading\']')

print 'My start:', html.tostring(start)

# Get next math equation
nextXPath = 'following::.//span[@class=\'MathJax_SVG\']'
nextElem = start.xpath(nextXPath)

if len(nextElem) > 0:
    print 'Next equation:', html.tostring(nextElem[0])
else:
    print 'No next equation...'
share|improve this question
    
It seems that following when using a subelement behaves exactly like following-siblings. This should be a bug, since subelements have references to their parents. –  Spen-ZAR Jan 17 at 23:32
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2 Answers

Do you need to iterate through the document? You could also search for span elements of the class MathJax_SVG directly:

from lxml import etree
doc = etree.parse(open("test-document.html")).getroot()
maths = doc.xpath("//span[@class='MathJax_SVG']")
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I have to do this iteratively. There can be literally tens of thousands of equations, and since this code is meant to run in real-time, it has to be extra speedy. I'll post the test code I'm using. –  Spen-ZAR Jan 17 at 23:00
    
Well, iterator in the sense of a generator. –  Spen-ZAR Jan 17 at 23:04
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I ended up creating my own function to get what I want. I called it getNext(elem, xpathString). If there is a more efficient way to do this, I'm all ears. I'm not confident in its performance.

from lxml import html

def getNext(elem, xpathString):
    '''
    Gets the next element defined by XPath. The element returned
    may be itself.
    '''
    myElem = elem
    nextElem = elem.find(xpathString)

    while nextElem is None:

        if myElem.getnext() is not None:
            myElem = myElem.getnext()
            nextElem = myElem.find(xpathString)

        else:
            if myElem.getparent() is not None:
                myElem = myElem.getparent()
            else:
                break

    return nextElem


# Get my html element
with open('test.html', 'r') as f:
    myHtml = html.fromstring(f.read())

# Get the first MathJax element
start = myHtml.find('.//span[@id=\'MathJax_Element_Frame_1\']')

print 'My start:', html.tostring(start)

# Get next math equation
nextXPath = './/span[@class=\'MathJax_SVG\']'
nextElem = getNext(start, nextXPath)

if nextElem is not None:
    print 'Next equation:', html.tostring(nextElem)
else:
    print 'No next equation...'
share|improve this answer
    
Above code's wrong. It doesn't take into account the element's children, since they get skipped. –  Spen-ZAR Jan 18 at 0:27
    
Also, with tens of thousands of equations, I can see this function overflowing the stack pretty fast. –  Spen-ZAR Jan 18 at 0:41
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