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This is a program i was asked to do for a class, it has to solve a sudoku puzzle of size nxn using a backtracking algorithm but it's not required to to check for subsquares, only rows and columns. the problem with my program is that the backtracking part never triggers :( whenever it reaches a point where it can't continue it stops and prints the board instead of erasing the last attempt and trying something else. sorry in advance for the lack of comments, i only have access to the code at the moment (not at home) but it's mostly pretty simple functions and the problem is in aux_solveSudoku and sudoku functions, here's the code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

#define UNASSIGNED 0

bool aux_SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n]);
bool SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col);
bool check(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col, int number);
bool CheckRow(int n, int array[][n], int row, int number);
bool CheckCol(int n, int array[][n], int col, int number);
bool CheckIfFull(int n, int array[][n]);
void printArray(int n, int array[][n]);

int main()
{
    int n;
    scanf(" %d", &n);
    int array[n][n];

    for(int i=0; i<n; i++){
        for(int j=0; j<n; j++){
            scanf(" %d",&array[i][j]);
        }
    }
    if (aux_SolveSudoku(n, array) == true)
          printArray(n, array);
    else
         printf("No Solution!");


  return 0;
}

bool aux_SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n]){
    for (int row = 0; row < n; row++){
        for (int col = 0; col < n; col++){
            if (SolveSudoku(n, array, row, col) && CheckIfFull(n, array))
                return true;}
    }
    return false;
}

bool SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col){
    if(array[row][col] != UNASSIGNED)
        return true;

    for(int i=1; i<=n; i++){
        if(check(n, array, row, col, i)){
            array[row][col] = i;

            if(SolveSudoku(n, array, row, col))
                return true;

            array[row][col] = UNASSIGNED;
        }
    }    
    return false;
}

bool check(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col, int number){
    return (!CheckRow(n, array, row, number) && !CheckCol(n, array, col, number));
} 

bool CheckRow(int n, int array[][n], int row, int number){
    for (int col = 0; col < n; col++){
        if (array[row][col] == number){
            return true;}
    }
    return false;
}

bool CheckCol(int n, int array[][n], int col, int number){
    for (int row = 0; row <  n; row++){
        if (array[row][col] == number){
            return true;}
    }
    return false;

}

bool CheckIfFull(int n, int array[][n]){
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++){
            for (int j = 0; j < n; j++){
                if(array[i][j] == UNASSIGNED)
                    return false;
                    }
            }
    return true;
}

void printArray(int n, int array[][n]){
    for (int row = 0; row < n; row++){
            for (int col = 0; col < n; col++){
                printf("%d ", array[row][col]);}
            printf("\n");
        }
}

This is an example set of data for the program:

5
0 0 0 2 4
3 1 0 0 2
0 2 1 0 5
2 0 3 0 0
0 0 0 0 0

This clearly has a solution:

1 3 5 2 4
3 1 4 5 2
4 2 1 3 5
2 5 3 4 1
5 4 2 1 3

Unfortunately, the program does not find the solution, but I do not understand why not.

share|improve this question
1  
Just so you know that is not valid c code. It is C++ which uses c functions. There is no bool type in c. You have to use int instead. –  chasep255 Jan 18 at 0:30
1  
@chasep255: There is an _Bool type in C99 and C11; if you use the header <stdbool.h>, there is also a bool type, and the code uses <stdbool.h> (which C++ code would not do). Don't forget, the MSVC compiler implements a standard that is almost a quarter century old (later this year, it will be a quarter of a century old), and not either of the more recent versions of the standard. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 18 at 0:42
    
Actually, there's another reason this is not C++ code; it uses C99 VLAs (variable length arrays), which are not a part of any standard version of C++ (though the G++ compiler does accept them as an extension). –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 18 at 0:51
    
One of the first things to do is to make sure that the data entered matches what you thought was entered; print the Sudoku board before calling aux_SudokuSolver(). It might be more conventional to call the entry point SudokuSolver() and the recursive function aux_SudokuSolver() (reversing the current roles). However, that's trivia. Have you tested it on 1x1 and 2x2 boards? What about 3x3? The code compiles cleanly for me (good). I would want to print out the board as it is being processed, on each (recursive) entry to SudokuSolver(), so I could see what it was up to. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 18 at 0:53

2 Answers 2

The backtracking can't work because of this part of the code.

bool SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col){
    if(array[row][col] != UNASSIGNED)
        return true;

    for(int i=1; i<=n; i++){
        if(check(n, array, row, col, i)){
            array[row][col] = i;

            if(SolveSudoku(n, array, row, col))
                return true;

            array[row][col] = UNASSIGNED;
        }
    }    
    return false;
}

Specifically, when the check method returns true, array[row][col] is set to i.

In the next statement, SolveSudoku is called, but on the same value of row and col.

Since this value is not unassigned, SolveSudoku will return true. Since it returns true, only one value is ever tried per location. Recursion is not being leveraged in the right way.

I hope this explains why backtracking does not happen in your code. Good luck! Let me know if you have any more questions...

Here as an example I wrote in Java. The solve method is not called in a nested for loop, so certain end conditions are evaluated in a different way. You just call this method with 0, 0 and it goes from there....

void solve(int r, int c)
{
    if(board[r][c] == 0)
    {
        for(int i = 1; i < 10; i++)
        {
            if (!inRow(i, r) && !inCol(i, c) && !inSqr(i, r, c))
            {
                board[r][c] = i;
                if(r == 8 && c == 8)
                {
                    printBoard();
                    System.exit(0);
                }
                else if(c == 8) solve(r + 1, 0);
                else solve(r, c + 1);
            }
        }
        board[r][c] = 0;
    }
    else if(r == 8 && c == 8)
    {
        printBoard();
        System.exit(0);
    }
    else if(c == 8) 
    {
        solve(r + 1, 0);
    }
    else 
    {
        solve(r, c + 1);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks alot for the input, i think i understand more clearly where my problem is, but i'm still unable to solve :( i tried correcting according to your solution (i even tried coping the solution and adapting it to my code) but now instead of not going back to keeps going beyond n, for example if the board is 5x5 and unsolvable it start assigning 6s to solve it, even though the i loop stops at 5 inside the function, and for some inputs it goes into an infinite loop for some reason. –  user3208617 Jan 18 at 14:10
    
The problem is the interaction between the aux_SolveSudoku and the SolveSudoku. In my code, notice that I "kick off" the solve method, and it takes care of calling itself. This is a simple way to manage the levels of recursion. Does this help? –  Garrett Openshaw Jan 18 at 14:15

You will need to provide an example of a Sudoku board that it mishandles. My (admittedly not dreadfully stressful) testing shows it behaving OK, though it does not seem to recurse in SudokuSolver(), which may be the gist of your concern.

3x3 solvable

3
0 1 0
2 0 1
0 0 0

Output from instrumented program

-->> SolveSudoku (3x3) - r=0, c=0, level = 1:
0 1 0 
2 0 1 
0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (3x3) - r=0, c=2, level = 1:
3 1 0 
2 0 1 
0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (3x3) - r=1, c=1, level = 1:
3 1 2 
2 0 1 
0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (3x3) - r=2, c=0, level = 1:
3 1 2 
2 3 1 
0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (3x3) - r=2, c=1, level = 1:
3 1 2 
2 3 1 
1 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (3x3) - r=2, c=2, level = 1:
3 1 2 
2 3 1 
1 2 0 
Solution:
3 1 2 
2 3 1 
1 2 3 

4x4 solvable

4
4 0 1 0
3 2 0 0
0 0 0 3
0 0 0 0

Expected solution

4 3 1 2
3 2 4 1
1 4 2 3
2 1 3 4

Output from instrumented program

-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=0, c=1, level = 1:
4 0 1 0 
3 2 0 0 
0 0 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=0, c=3, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 0 0 
0 0 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=1, c=2, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 0 0 
0 0 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=1, c=3, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 0 
0 0 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=2, c=0, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
0 0 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=2, c=1, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 0 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=2, c=2, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 0 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=0, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 2 3 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=1, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 2 3 
2 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=2, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 2 3 
2 1 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=3, level = 1:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 2 3 
2 1 3 0 
Solution:
4 3 1 2 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 2 3 
2 1 3 4 

4x4 unsolvable

4
4 0 1 0
3 2 0 0
0 0 0 2
0 0 0 0

It's unsolvable because there's nowhere to place a 2 on the first row.

-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=0, c=1, level = 1:
4 0 1 0 
3 2 0 0 
0 0 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=0, c=3, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 0 0 
0 0 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=1, c=2, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 0 0 
0 0 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=1, c=3, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 0 
0 0 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=2, c=0, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
0 0 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=2, c=1, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
1 0 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=2, c=2, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 0 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=0, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 3 2 
0 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=1, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 3 2 
2 0 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=2, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 3 2 
2 1 0 0 
-->> SolveSudoku (4x4) - r=3, c=3, level = 1:
4 3 1 0 
3 2 4 1 
1 4 3 2 
2 1 0 0 
No Solution!

Instrumented code

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdbool.h>

#define UNASSIGNED 0

bool aux_SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n]);
bool SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col);
bool check(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col, int number);
bool CheckRow(int n, int array[][n], int row, int number);
bool CheckCol(int n, int array[][n], int col, int number);
bool CheckIfFull(int n, int array[][n]);
void printArray(int n, int array[][n]);

int main(void)
{
    int n;
    scanf(" %d", &n);
    int array[n][n];

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            scanf(" %d", &array[i][j]);
    }

    if (aux_SolveSudoku(n, array) == true)
    {
        printf("Solution:\n");
        printArray(n, array);
    }
    else
        printf("No Solution!\n");

    return 0;
}

bool aux_SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n])
{
    for (int row = 0; row < n; row++)
    {
        for (int col = 0; col < n; col++)
        {
            if (SolveSudoku(n, array, row, col) && CheckIfFull(n, array))
                return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

bool SolveSudoku(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col)
{
    if (array[row][col] != UNASSIGNED)
        return true;
    static int level = 0;

    level++;
    printf("-->> SolveSudoku (%dx%d) - r=%d, c=%d, level = %d:\n", n, n, row, col, level);
    printArray(n, array);

    for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
    {
        if (check(n, array, row, col, i))
        {
            array[row][col] = i;

            if (SolveSudoku(n, array, row, col))
            {
                level--;
                return true;
            }

            array[row][col] = UNASSIGNED;
        }
    }
    level--;
    return false;
}

bool check(int n, int array[][n], int row, int col, int number)
{
    return(!CheckRow(n, array, row, number) && !CheckCol(n, array, col, number));
}

bool CheckRow(int n, int array[][n], int row, int number)
{
    for (int col = 0; col < n; col++)
    {
        if (array[row][col] == number)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

bool CheckCol(int n, int array[][n], int col, int number)
{
    for (int row = 0; row <  n; row++)
    {
        if (array[row][col] == number)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

bool CheckIfFull(int n, int array[][n])
{
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
        {
            if (array[i][j] == UNASSIGNED)
                return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

void printArray(int n, int array[][n])
{
    for (int row = 0; row < n; row++)
    {
        for (int col = 0; col < n; col++)
        {
            printf("%d ", array[row][col]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

The changes are basically minimal. You don't need <stdlib.h>; you do need newlines at the end of outputs. The code calls printArray() more copiously, and identifies the solution when it finds one (necessary to avoid mixing the solution with the trace). It keeps a level counter that is incremented when the function is entered for an unassigned square.

You don't validate the input (but could and arguably should); the instrumented code doesn't validate the data either.


Further observation

Each time that aux_SudokuSolver() calls SudokuSolver(), it should be attempting to solve the same (as yet unsolved) problem. However, if you make a copy of the array on entry to the function, and then compare the copy with the original array after SudokuSolver() returns unsuccessfully, you will find that the array is changed, so the code is not always solving the same problem. You have to make sure your are always attempting to solve the same problem at the top level.

share|improve this answer
    
an example where is misbehaves is : 5 0 0 0 2 4 3 1 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 5 2 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 which is supposed to be solvable. –  user3208617 Jan 18 at 15:21
    
I can affirm that (a) there is a solution (1 3 5 2 4 3 1 4 5 2 4 2 1 3 5 2 5 3 4 1 5 4 2 1 3), and (b) the program above does not find it. Further, it does not recurse unless there is a bug in my level-tracking code. As yet, I have no more to add. I observe that you could have improved your question by including the example where it failed to work — it would have given direction to the investigation. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 18 at 17:45

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